Posts tagged with "Page":

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2016 Best of Design Award for Civic Institution: Architecture of Buffalo Bayou Park

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Civic Institution: Architecture of Buffalo Bayou Park Architect: Page Location: Houston, TX

As part of a varied program of structures commissioned for Houston’s three-mile long Buffalo Bayou Park, Page’s pavilion is designed to withstand the area’s frequent flooding. Solid board-formed concrete piers provide resistance to flood damage and are paired with an expressive steel frame and delicate steel screens to create shade. When a severe flooding event occurred just after completion of the structures, no damage was sustained.

Landscape Architect SWA Group

Environmental Consultant Hunt & Hunt Engineering Corp. Contractor Millis Development & Construction Wood Supplier US Lumber Brokers Railing Manufacturer Pool Custom Ironworks

Honorable Mention, Civic Institution: Congregation Beit Simchat Torah

Architect: Architecture Research Office Location: New York, NY

To provide a home for the world’s largest LGBTQ Jewish community, ARO renovated a landmark Cass Gilbert–designed warehouse to create a synagogue that embodies the community’s core values of transparency, intimacy, warmth, and flexibility.

Honorable Mention, Civic Institution: Museum of Neon Art

Architect: Shimoda Design Group Location: Glendale, CA

The renovated 8,400-square-foot building and public pedestrian space infuses a new sense of cultural and pedestrian connectivity in downtown Glendale. Shimoda Design Group kept the interior of the gallery space as raw as possible, while maximizing its existing volumes to include a neon workshop, classroom, and museum shop.

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2016 Best of Design Award for Architectural Representation > Analog: Welcome to the 5th Facade

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Architectural Representation > Analog: Welcome to the 5th Facade Architect: Olson Kundig Location: (Conceptual)

Conceived as accompanying illustrations for Olson Kundig’s award-winning science fiction story entry to Blank Space Project’s annual Fairy Tales competition, the project is part of Olson Kundig’s broader investigation of rooftops. Each image depicts the main character of “Welcome to the 5th Facade” at five plot points and presents a future vision for Seattle, where the story is set. The hybrid images are comprised of four separate media types: mural-size drawings in charcoal and pencil on canvas, portrait photography, and CGI.

Honorable Mention, Architectural Representation > Analog: MEM: A Chapel & Columbarium

Architect: Robert Hutchison Architecture Location: Wye Mills, MD

This project is a conceptual exploration of memory in architecture: A son, confronted with his father’s loss of memory, requested a design for a family chapel and columbarium as an attempt to have a conversation with his father that he could no longer have.

Honorable Mention, Architectural Representation > Analog: Pierce Skypark

Architect: Page Location: Houston, TX

These hand-drawn renderings of a transformed section of Houston’s former elevated freeway were a strategic choice to generate interest and dialogue in the project by conveying a sense that the concept was still “in progress” and open to feedback.

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2016 Best of Design Award for Adaptive Restoration: The Cotton Gin at The Co-Op District by Antenora Architects

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Adaptive Restoration: The Cotton Gin at The Co-Op District Architects: Antenora Architects Location: Hutto, TX

As part of a new master plan for this 16-acre former agricultural co-op site, two cotton gin buildings were adapted into an open-air public events space. Perforated stainless steel on the south facade fills the area with diffused natural light while accentuating the delicacy and elegance of the original structure.

Structural Engineer Architectural Engineers Collaborative [AEC] Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing TTG General Contractor American Constructors Wall Panels Centria Lighting Supplier ERT Lighting

Honorable Mention, Adaptive Restoration: The Cistern

Architect: Page Location: Houston, TX

A minimal approach was taken to repurpose the 90-year-old decommissioned drinking water reservoir cistern into a destination and civic art space that is accessible and enjoyable. Soft LED lighting from the entry tunnel continues in transparent handrails around the perimeter of the 221 concrete columns within 87,500 square feet.

Honorable Mention, Adaptive Restoration:  Fisher Hill Reservoir Park Gatehouse

Architect: Touloukian Touloukian Inc. Location: Brookline, MA

This former reservoir was acquired by a local municipality to serve as a new soccer field. The original 1887 gatehouse became a restroom and the restoration includes full masonry re-pointing, roof and window replacement—a thoughtful marriage of the historic and the modern to preserve a strong sense of place.

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Stanford building new multi-modal trails by Page and BMS Design Group

According to Palo Alto Weekly, Stanford University will soon break ground on a new series of bike and walking trails around its campus designed by Page/BMS Design Group. The 3.4-mile "Perimeter Trail" will stretch along sections of El Camino Real, Junipero Serra Boulevard, and Stanford Avenue, providing new connections to local parks, schools, existing trails, and the nearby foothills. The project, being implemented by both Stanford and the city of Palo Alto, is being funded by a $4.5-million allocation from Santa Clara County. The scheme will both introduce new bike and walking paths (including green bike lanes in heavy traffic areas) and upgrade existing trails, sidewalks, and landscaping. According to Stanford, most of the trail is expected to be complete by this fall.
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Page Floats a Cedar Sunshade in Albuquerque

Minimalist catenary canopy lends warmth and lightness to office courtyard.

When Page design principal Larry Speck suggested a catenary sunshade for the courtyard of the new GSA building in Albuquerque, his colleagues set about identifying precedents. "There were some really great devices that we looked at, but a lot were done in the 1960s out of heavy, monumental materials," said principal Talmadge Smith. "We wondered if there was a way to do it in a lighter, more delicate way that would also introduce some warmth to the space." The architects elected to build the structure out of western red cedar, which performs particularly well in arid climates. Comprising 4-, 8-, and 12-foot boards suspended on steel cables, the sunshade appears as a wave of blonde wood floating in mid-air, casting slatted shadows on the glass walls of the courtyard. The courtyard is an important amenity in the two-story, 80,000-square-foot building, currently occupied by a combination of federal employees, including immigration and customs enforcement staff, and state and local law enforcement. "We said, 'This is a pretty big floor plate, it needs a great courtyard,'" said Smith. "For one thing, in this climate that's just what you build. You get free shading and can create a cooler microclimate." The courtyard also helps bring light into the communal spaces that surround it, which include training areas, circulation, and conference rooms. "It remains a democratic insertion into the floor plan," observed Smith. Finally, the courtyard allowed the architects to compensate for a lack of glazing on the exterior walls, the result of security requirements. Working in Revit and 3ds Max, Page experimented with various patterns for the sunshade. They first tried a regular arrangement of identical slats. "The result wasn't very pleasing," said Smith. "It made a drooping, uninviting shape. It also closed the courtyard, as if you had pulled a big venetian blind across it." They decided to break up the pattern and use three different modules of wood, placing them only where daylighting analysis dictated. They also worked with the cables themselves to identify the appropriate amount of slack. "We tested what it would be if you pulled the cables tight," said Smith. "It negated the effect of the catenary, and led to a courtyard with a little bit of a ceiling, a rigidity that we didn't want." The final design incorporates 18 inches worth of slack per cable.
  • Fabricator Enterprise Builders
  • Designers Page
  • Location Albuquerque
  • Date of Completion 2012
  • Material 2x6 western red cedar boards from US Lumber Brokers, steel cables, off-the-shelf hardware
  • Process Revit, 3ds Max, daylighting analysis, bolting, grouting, hanging
Enterprise Builders used off-the-shelf hardware to assemble and install the sunshade. The cedar boards are attached to the cables via steel clips bolted to one face of each board. Deciding against integrating hardware directly into the curtain walls, Page designed opaque concrete headers for the two short sides of the courtyard, then grouted the anchors into the masonry units. A turnbuckle attached to a pivot near each anchor allowed the builders to make adjustments to the length of the cables once they had been hung. A second, perpendicular, system of cables prevents the shading structure from swaying. "The hardest part was getting it level," said Smith. "There was a little art to that because some strands are more heavily loaded than the others." Fabricated out of standard lumber and mass-produced hardware, the sunshade might have felt bulky or crude. Instead, it provides relief from the New Mexico sun while seeming almost to dissolve into the sky. "When you're standing there, you only ever see half of the shading members at a time," said Smith. "You see a lot of sky, but you feel a lot of shade. It performs, but it feels light."
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Page Architects Transforming Basement Tunnels at Houston’s Niels Esperson Building

The historic Niels Esperson Building has lit up the Houston skyline since 1927, but far below the tower's neo-Classical cupola, a basement space connecting to a series of tunnels meandering underneath the city has remained out of the spotlight. Now, the building’s basement gets to play catch up in the fame game with a $2.5 million renovation spearheaded by architectural firm Page. The Niels Esperson Building is the only example of Italian Renaissance in Houston. Reconstruction entails maintaining architectural integrity while improving the existing businesses. The renovations will improve access to Houston’s underground tunnel system, which stretches out over six miles beneath the city. The improvements will hopefully solidify the building as a landmark in a city known for demolishing its architectural heritage. Page's design includes  several new business additions, including a public relations firm, a car sharing service, and a software company. The building's food court will be making new friends as well, with the addition of two new restaurants. The real show stealer is a two-story glass “art wall” that will stretch from the building’s basement level up into the lobby. The top half, which will feature an opaque geographic design, is intended to become a new landmark in downtown Houston’s landscape. Natural stone, wood veneer, textured glass, and stainless steel all will be used in the design, which is expected to reach completion by June 2014.
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Michael Graves’ paralysis informs design for Omaha Rehabilitation Hospital

The architect of Omaha’s new rehabilitation hospital says his own paralysis has given him “greater empathy,” which has informed his designs for the healthcare industry. Local firm DLR Group and Texas-based engineering firm Page are working with Michael Graves, who lost the use of his legs in 2003 as the result of an infection, on the $93 million Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital in west Omaha. Expected to be complete in 2016, the facility will use technology to afford sedentary patients greater control over the TV, thermostat, nurse call system, and other things in their room. Omaha’s World-Herald describes how Graves, 79, drew from personal experience while designing the 250,000-square-foot hospital:
Giving patients some control over their environment is important, said Graves and Patrick Burke, a principal in Graves' firm. Graves recalled one instance early in his rehab when he was being transferred from his bed to a chair using a motorized sling. “I was getting into the chair that day and I was up in the air, in a sitting position over my chair but not in it yet. The nurse's aide's friend came in and said, 'It's time for our break.' So they left me there dangling in the air and they went on a break. That's as low as it gets.”
The average stay at Madonna is more than 30 days, but residents tend to be more mobile than many hospital patients. That creates a need for active social spaces, Graves said, but also a pitfall: many architects want hospitals to resemble hotels. “Well, I don’t,” he told the Omaha World-Herald's Bob Glissmann. “I don't think it needs a big atrium and I don't think the rooms have to look like a hotel room. These are hospital rooms, and you want to have good care. What makes the difference is the empathy.”