Posts tagged with "over-budget":

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Eavesdrop> Breaking the Bank: Price of Kengo Kuma’s Dundee V&A Museum soars sky high

Kengo Kuma’s Victoria & Albert Museum of Design in Dundee, Scotland, hasn’t even broken ground yet, but it has already racked up a pretty substantial bill. In fact, the museum project is expected to cost roughly $80 million, a whopping $35 million more than initially projected. Kuma won the commission back in 2012 and has supposedly already tweaked the design to cut down costs. "The V&A Museum of Design Dundee is a very complex project, we have done extensive cost checking during the design process, and we have market-tested the major building packages with various contractors," Kuma’s firm told Building magazine. "Due to several factors, including inflation and current market conditions, the tender returned surprisingly high and this was unexpected even to the main contractors due to the complex nature of the project." The project was recently reviewed by the city after the price dramatically increased, but after a meeting this month, city councillors have approved the new budget and are working on a plan to raise additional funds. If all goes well and the City of Dundee can swing the hefty costs with the help of private funding, the V&A will be open by 2018.
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Holl’s Pricey New Library in Queens Must Tone it Down a Notch

Looks like Steven Holl’s impressive design for a new library in Queens, New York costs quite a bit more than expected. DNA Info reported that bids for the 21,000-square-foot project came in about $10-20 million over budget. But that doesn’t mean the project is dead just yet. While the city has nixed a planned geothermal heating and cooling system, is swapping customized interior fixtures for standard ones, and is replacing the aluminum façade with painted concrete, they say the library will stay true to its original design. Despite the changes, the  library will still include an amphitheater, community room and a reading garden.  A spokesperson for the Queens Public Library said a timeline will not be available until new bids are evaluated by the Department of Design and Construction. interior-hall-archpaper
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Calatrava Must Pay: Spanish Architect Loses Latest Legal Saga

Santiago Calatrava has been ordered by a Spanish court to pay $4 million for problems plaguing a municipal building he designed in Oviedo in Northwest Spain. While the final fee is lower than an initial ruling, such legal problems have become something of an unfortunate calling card for the Spanish architect. The Palacio de Congresos de Oviedo was completed in 2011 and features the soaring forms and white ribs that tend to populate Calatrava's work. The suit stems from issues involving the construction of the building as well as the project's final budget, which exceeded original estimates. Calatrava's fairly loose interpretation of budgetary restrictions has come under fire throughout the architect's prolific career. He is also in the midst of a legal battle regarding an opera house in Valencia whose final cost of $455.6 million—four times greater than its original budget—was not enough to ensure structural stability for more than a decade. Part of Valencia's City of Arts and Sciences that the architect had a major role in designing, the concert hall is the biggest fish in a sea of problems besetting the complex. Practicality has also not always been a strong suit for the architect. Bridges in Venice and Bilbao have both developed reputations for the extreme slipperiness among other issues. An airport he designed for the latter city was found lacking in a sheltered arrivals hall, a problem that Calatrava himself was forced to remedy. And the list continues. Assuming all goes according to plan, by 2015 New Yorkers will be able to witness what may be the zenith of the troubled beauty that has come to define Calatrava's works. The World Trade Center Transporation Hub represents his avian aesthetic at its most striking. However, the project's completion date is six years behind schedule, while its initial budget of $2 billion has since swelled to $4 billion.