Posts tagged with "outdoor":

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Six outdoor pavers that chart a new path in landscape design

Perfect for high-traffic areas, these outdoor flooring solutions have the wherewithal to last through the hottest summers and the coldest winters.
Pavimento Artistic Tile While terrazzo is typically poured in place, these large-format porcelain tiles can be assembled in a jiffy on-site. Because they’re commercial grade, the tiles are low maintenance and require no shining or waxing. Que bello!
Monolithic Membrane MM6125 American Hydrotech, Inc. Waterproof parking decks, planters, and roof areas alike with this extra thick thermoplastic fabric. Because it is more than three times thicker than typical waterproofing barriers, it can also hold three times the amount of water.
Soke Dekton by Cosentino This synthetic composite flooring has no cracks or imperfections, making it perfect for high traffic areas and extreme weather. Emulating the industrial look and cool touch of concrete, Soke has a matte finish distinguished by marble veining.
U-Cara Unilock Create dynamic brick walls and siding with this system. The patented design allows for various layouts and color combinations to be accurately assembled on tracks that connect to the back of the bricks.
Ipê Wood Tile Bison Innovative Products Ipê—also known as Brazilian Walnut—is so dense it doesn’t float in water. Known for durability and resistance to fire, the wooden planks, sourced from Central and South America and manufactured in Denver, make long-lasting decks and boardwalks.

Bera & Beren Walker Zanger

Bera & Beren porcelain tiles emulate the look and feel of fine-grain Portuguese and Spanish limestone, but unlike the naturally occurring stone, these tiles are made for high-traffic areas. They are available in smooth and textured finishes in a range of sizes and a rainbow of mineral-inspired colors.
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Bjarke Ingels brings the park up to the tower in a new skyscraper at Hudson Yards

In a new Manhattan skyscraper, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) reinterprets the tower-in-the-park by bringing the park up into the tower. https://vimeo.com/154626810 Today, the New York–based firm unveiled The Spiral, a 65-story skyscraper at Hudson Yards. The tower, programmed for offices and 27,000 square feet of retail, is located along the High Line, with a front entrance facing under-construction Hudson Park and Hudson Boulevard East. For those tracking the recent explosion of supertalls, The Spiral, at 1,005 feet, is eye-level with 1,004-foot One57. The prevailing visual element is a stepped group of terraces and hanging gardens, connected to double height atria, that wrap around the side of the building. For tenants renting out multiple floors, the atria can be programmed to connect to other floors, a tweak that could reduce reliance on elevators. Storytelling plays a strong role BIG's practice. The firm has a knack for delivering chronicles that distill the complexity of urban space and the ambiguities of history into a straightforward narrative that situates a project in time and place just so. “The Spiral will punctuate the northern end of the High Line, and the linear park will appear to carry through into the tower, forming an ascending ribbon of lively green spaces, extending the High Line to the skyline," asserted BIG founding principal Bjarke Ingels, in a statement. "The Spiral combines the classic Ziggurat silhouette of the premodern skyscraper with the slender proportions and efficient layouts of the modern high-rise. Designed for the people that occupy it, The Spiral ensures that every floor of the tower opens up to the outdoors creating hanging gardens and cascading atria that connect the open floor plates from the ground floor to the summit into a single uninterrupted work space. The string of terraces wrapping around the building expand the daily life of the tenants to the outside air and light.” In a video accompanying today's announcement, Ingels nails down the appeal of the swirl with pretty motifs from science and nature: "The spiral's immaculate geometry, and its suggestion of the infinite, that has mesmerized us in all cultures, and across time and place." The Spiral, he posits, will be "a new tower that stands out among its neighbors, yet feels completely at home." As buildings should? With BIG's unveil, Phase 1 development is continuing apace at Hudson Yards. When complete, the new neighborhood will allow for 26 million square feet of office space, 20,000 units of new housing, three million square feet for hotels, and two million square feet of retail. Hudson Yards first skyscraper, KPF's 10 Hudson Yards, topped out last October, with construction on 15, 30, 35, 50, and 55 Hudson Yards well underway.
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Enormous architecture-shaped pillows will fill a vacant field for Chicago’s third annual Ragdale Ring

A suburban field on Chicago's North Shore will host a fantastical summer pavilion fashioned after a toy box, with outsized pillows in the shape of architectural elements, according to designs selected as the winner of the third annual Ragdale Ring competition. Young Chicago designers Design With Company (Dw/Co) took their cues from the original Ragdale Ring garden theatre designed by architect Howard Van Doren Shaw in 1912. The Ragdale Foundation was founded in 1897 on the grounds of Arts and Crafts architect Shaw’s summer home in Lake Forest, Illinois, 30 miles north of Chicago. Architects Stewart Hicks and Allison Newmeyer dubbed their contemporary interpretation of the outdoor theater Shaw Town. Dw/Co plucked architectural details from some of Shaw's early 20th century buildings in the Chicago area—such as the rooftops of Market Square in Lake Forest and the Quadrangle Club at the University of Chicago—and created “audience-friendly pillows” in their form, to be stored in a giant wooden toy box when not in use. “The moveable pillows sprinkled across the landscape are intended to be used by the audience in a multitude of ways from seating to play,” reads Ragdale's announcement. “Visitors are encouraged to rediscover Shaw’s buildings without even knowing it.” Last year's winner, New York–based Bittertang Farm, sculpted an earthen grotto from packs of hay. (See a gallery of photos from that installation here.) Like Bittertang's ring, Shaw Town is also made from biodegradable materials. Shaw Town, whose construction will be funded by a $15,000 production grant, debuts June 13 at 1230 North Green Bay Road, Lake Forest, Illinois. More information can be found on Ragdale's website, ragdale.org.
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Product> Human Nature: Outdoor Furniture and Finishings That Stand Up To Mother Nature

Make the most of summer with a range of furnishings and finishings for hospitality, retail, and public urban spaces that can withstand the elements. Sponeck Chair & Table GreenForm Designer and architect Julia von Sponeck connected two curved sheets of fiber cement for a sturdy yet forgiving outdoor seating solution (above). Optional felt covers in gray, red, or a vibrant chartreuse coordinate with the body’s cement gray or custom coloring. Dimensions measure 31-by-24-by-20 inches with a seat height of 10 inches, while the coordinating 20-inch square table matches the seat height. Hedge-A-Matic greenscreen Define outdoor space with greenscreen’s fiberglass planters. They come in a curved or straight 48-by-18-inch base in 21 colors with a gloss, orange peel, sand, or matte finish. A 3-inch-deep powder-coated screen—also available in a curved or flat profile—is available in green, silver, black, or white for an overall height of 58 inches. Quartz Series Kornegay Design Informed by the facets of raw quartz crystals, Kornegay Design captures both the sharp edges and smooth surfaces in this collection of pre-cast concrete planters. Weighing just less than 2,200 pounds, the furnishings can withstand extreme weather and heavy pedestrian traffic. Four sizes range from 27 inches to 39 inches in height, and 23½ inches to 36½ inches in width, in a range of custom-mixed pigment dyes. Bicicleta Nanimarquina Inspired by a visit to India—where bicycling is one of the most popular transportation methods—Nanimarquina’s hand-loomed Bicicleta is made from repurposed 130/140 bicycle inner tubes. The 100 percent recycled area rug features a springy pile height of just under 1½ inches with an overall size of 5.6 feet by 7.9 feet. Decking Resysta This decking material is extruded from 60 percent rice husks, 22 percent salt, and 18 percent mineral oil. Its unique construction makes it ideal for outdoor applications. It can withstand rain, sun, snow, and salt water with or without a proprietary surface glazing that comes in 21 shades. Unlike conventional wood decking, Resysta features a Class A fire NFPA fire rating, and is also resistant to pest and fungal growth. Vigor Royal Botania Kris Van Puyvelde designed this outdoor dining table, which features thick, rough-hewn teak or mahagony boards dovetailed to a powder-coated aluminum frame for a handcrafted touch. The table measures 126 inches in length and 43 inches in width, with an overall height of 30 inches. Sled-based stools and a bench are also available for a complete dining collection. Rocking Chair SIXINCH Belgian furniture company SIXINCH recently established headquarters in Indiana to bring more than 50 products to the U.S., including the Rainer Mutsch-designed Rocking Chair. Made from rotational molded plastic, the chiseled outdoor piece comes in 20 bright colors and measures 25½ inches in height and 38½ inches in width, with a seat height of 15 inches. Spring Wildspirit Strips of steam-bent bamboo form Spring, a tabouret for use across a wide range of applications thanks to the fibrous material’s inherent strength and flexibility. Designed by Erik Jansen, its classic hourglass shape is suitable for backless seating or an ad hoc side table. Spring measures 19.7 inches in height and 16.1 inches in diameter.