Posts tagged with "Openings":

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Meet the honorable mentions in our 2017 Best of Product Awards!

Last week we shared the winning designs from our largest-ever Products Awards across 15 sundry categories, including technology, textiles, HVAC, furniture, facades, and more. Scroll through the slideshow to see the the honorable mentions from each category, evaluated by our team of judges for innovation, aesthetics, performance, and value. You can find our winners and honorable mentions featured in our September issue—out September 6! The Best of Products Awards Jury: James Biber Partner, Biber Architects Olivia Martin Managing Editor, The Architect’s Newspaper William Menking Editor in Chief, The Architect’s Newspaper Patrick Parrish Owner, Patrick Parrish Gallery Tucker Viemeister Founder, Viemeister Industries Pilar Viladas Design writer and editor HONORABLE MENTIONS To view images of all honorable mentions, please click through the slideshow above. Finishes & Surfaces CONDUCT by Flavor Paper PUZZLE by Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby for Mutina for Stone Source Bath LINEA SHOWER BASE by Fiora VERGE WITH WASHBAR by Bradley Corp. Lighting SYMMETRY by Visa Lighting LIFT WITH BIOS by Pinnacle Architectural Lighting Textiles SIGNATURE & LEGACY COLLECTIONS by KnollTextiles SHADE by Chilewich Openings GPX FIREFLOOR SYSTEM by Safti First CURVED by Vitrocsa Technology & Innovation MATTERPORT PRO2 3D CAMERA by Matterport PORTABLE ULTRA SHORT THROW PROJECTOR by Sony Kitchen 4-DOOR FLEX REFRIGERATOR by Samsung VERTICAL BAR BLOCK by Henrybuilt Interior Commercial Furniture GLASSCUBE by CARVART KANSO BENCH by HBF Interior Residential Furniture STEMN SERIES by Fyrn DICHROIC TABLE by Rottet Collection Structural FIRE AND WATER BARRIER TAPE by 3M SCHLUTER-DITRA-HEAT-DUO by Schluter Systems Smart Home Systems EVOLVED MINNEAPOLIS FULL ESCUTCHEON HANDLESET by Baldwin Hardware PANOVISTA MAX by Renson Facades PHOTOVOLTAIC FACADE by Onyx Solar TRIANGULAR RAINSCREEN PANEL by Shildan HVAC EME3625DFL LOUVER by Ruskin AIRFLOW PANEL by Architectural Applications Outdoor Public GO OUTDOORTABLE by Landscape Forms ULURU by Metalco srl/id metalco, Inc. Outdoor Residential CLOUD BENCH by Bend Goods VERTICAL LOUNGER by DEESAWAT  
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2015 Best of Products Awards> Facades + Structural and Openings

On a hot day in June, a jury convened to review nearly 400 entries to The Architect’s Newspaper first Best of Products competition. Submissions, divided over eight categories, abounded in new materials and exciting technologies, provoking a lively dialogue during the evaluation process. Colin Brice of Mapos, Barry Goralnick of Barry Goralnick Architects, Harshad Pillai of Fogarty Finger Architecture, and architect Alison Spear generously contributed their considerable expertise and insight to the judging. While the complete roster of winners can be found in our just-published print edition, AN will be publishing the results daily over the next week. The entries in today’s categories, Facades + Structural and Openings, show a joint interest in streamlining the installation process while expanding aesthetic possibilities. View all of the published categories here. FACADES + STRUCTURAL “Good technology, exciting optics.” —Barry Goralnick Winner UniQuad Unitized Daylighting System CPI Daylighting The UniQuad system is a unitized assembly of two independent, translucent, insulated panels, joined by a mechanically interlocking structural connection that eliminates the need for vulnerable adhesives. Factory pre-fabricated for efficient installation, the panels’ long-span capability (up to twelve feet) allows them to be clicked into place on site, providing a seamless, flush look without metal seams. UniQuad features Removable Skin Technology (RST), which protects the interior panel from exterior weather conditions, UV radiation, impact and other hazards and provides indefinite building envelope protection. RST allows the replacement of the exterior skin while keeping the interior skin sealed and intact. As a result, building operations are uninterrupted during exterior panel replacement. Honorable Mention Metal Composite Wall Panels Kovabond Kovabond is a metal composite material designed to provide extensive design options for exterior cladding and wall panels. Kovabond consists of two outer skins, available in aluminum, zinc, copper, and stainless steel, that surround a solid core of low-density, fire-retarding, polyethylene compound. Available in a broad palette of colors, the lightweight panels are highly bendable, yet retain their rigidity and strength. Honorable Mention Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete Panel seele A tour de force of design and fabrication, this glass fiber reinforced concrete panel is attached to a back-up steel frame that allows for installation. With a section view slightly resembling an upside-down letter "L", the soffit panel gently curves inward. The abnormally long leg of the "L" shape is a parallelogram with a bowl-shaped depression on the surface. It’s one of 2,500 panels made from 313 different molds that will wrap the Broad Museum in Los Angeles. OPENINGS Winner 2C Window Weco Windows S.L. Developed by a team of Spanish architects, this re-envisioning of the traditional wood window features a sash that combines glass and hardware in a single assembly, without a frame. The self-supporting glass becomes a sheer, transparent plane, maximizing light and transparency. Wall openings are framed in wood, the glazing fitting hermetically over the frame using advanced technology in hardware and sealants. Triple gaskets assure maximum thermal and acoustical performance. The double- or triple-glazed window is available in fixed, tilt-and-turn, sliding, and hinged versions. The sliding window allows unbroken openings up to 19 ½ feet long. The interior face of the unit is finished in baked enamel in black, white, or any RAL color. “Up to a 48-foot opening: That presents outstanding options.” —Colin Brice Honorable Mention JELD-WEN Custom Wood Folding Window JELD-WEN Windows & Doors A novel solution for residential or light commercial projects, this accordion-folding window assembly folds off to the side of the opening to connect the kitchen—or any room—to a backyard, deck, or patio at counter height. The system, with up to eight panels, is available as a top-hung application and can be designed as either a flush sill that smoothly meets the stretch of counter or as a standard outswing sill. The maximum opening width is 48 feet, achieved by combining two 24-foot installations. Available in multiple configurations, the folding window is offered in 42 exterior paint finishes, three copper panel options, and a variety of wood species. Honorable Mention Entice Series Premium Entrance System CRL-U.S. Aluminum While this system retains the elegant appearance of a frameless glass entrance with minimal vertical lines, it has the strength to support door handle hardware on one-inch-thick insulating glass panels. Designed for use with all high solar- and thermal-efficient glass options, including low-E coatings and tints, Entice delivers contemporary heavy-glass storefront aesthetics while satisfying energy code requirements and ASHRAE 90.1 air infiltration criteria. Patent-pending vertical stiles with ultra narrow sightlines and door rails feature thermally broken cladding that provides U-factors as low as 0.33. In addition, configurations with prewired LED lighting systems provide commercial environments with striking accent lighting that enhances the function and appearance of the facade.
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Scavolini Comes to Soho

If sleek Italian kitchens send your heart racing more than a Maserati ever could, stop by Scavolini's new Soho location at 429 West Broadway for a test drive. The showroom, which opened to the public yesterday, is the manufacturer's first U.S. flagship and features 15 kitchens designed to show off a range of modern and traditional styles. Scavolini worked with SpaCe Architects to design the 10,000-square-foot space on two levels in what was formerly the Nancy Hoffman Gallery. Inside, the showroom maintains a gallery feel. Red glass stairs float within a webbed enclosure above a floor of river rocks, leading clients downstairs to large work tables where they can meet with the gallery team (who trained at the company's facility in Italy) among more kitchen displays. The showroom will also feature a dedicated working kitchen, Scavolini's popular Crystal design updated with a new pattern by Karim Rashid and the latest Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances—be sure to stop by for a cooking demonstration, or snag an invite to the official grand opening party on November 16.
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Welcome to the MAD House

The Museum of Art and Design held its reception for architects and designers last Friday, and while the tchotke-lined galleries were packed with fancypants and fancy glasses, AN did not spot too many boldfaces--perhaps everyone was home warming up their popcorn for the debate. We did see Barry Bergdoll, Matilda McQuade, and Karen Stein and even asked a few people what they thought of Brad Cloepfil's resplendent new digs. Raj Patel, a designer at ARUP who worked on the museum, said it was good the team could get together and enjoy the space it worked so hard on. "A lot of people have spent a lot of time and worked a lot on the process of making this happen," Patel said. "Now it's time to celebrate." And his favorite part of the museum? "Obviously, the building is best at day, but the light is just amazing no matter what." Suzanne Stephens, the deputy editor at Record, wasn't so sure. "Everyone's talking about the debate," she said, "but when they aren't, it's the lighting strategy. It's either got to be party lighting or museum lighting. You can't have both." She did agree with Patel on one point, though. "I'll have to decide during the day." Cloepfil spent most of the night holding court near the door. Asked about the economy, which, after the debate and the lighting, seemed to be on everyone's mind, the Portland-based designer took a jab at himself. "Do we need museums that cost $1,200 per square-foot?" he asked, gesturing around the lobby. "I'm not sure we do. I don't think there's any wrong with that, but it's not sustainable for now. We just have to adapt, cut back. Cut the fat. It'll be good, cleansing." Here's to slimmer architecture.