Posts tagged with "Olson Kundig":

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2016 Best of Design Award for Architectural Representation > Analog: Welcome to the 5th Facade

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Architectural Representation > Analog: Welcome to the 5th Facade Architect: Olson Kundig Location: (Conceptual)

Conceived as accompanying illustrations for Olson Kundig’s award-winning science fiction story entry to Blank Space Project’s annual Fairy Tales competition, the project is part of Olson Kundig’s broader investigation of rooftops. Each image depicts the main character of “Welcome to the 5th Facade” at five plot points and presents a future vision for Seattle, where the story is set. The hybrid images are comprised of four separate media types: mural-size drawings in charcoal and pencil on canvas, portrait photography, and CGI.

Honorable Mention, Architectural Representation > Analog: MEM: A Chapel & Columbarium

Architect: Robert Hutchison Architecture Location: Wye Mills, MD

This project is a conceptual exploration of memory in architecture: A son, confronted with his father’s loss of memory, requested a design for a family chapel and columbarium as an attempt to have a conversation with his father that he could no longer have.

Honorable Mention, Architectural Representation > Analog: Pierce Skypark

Architect: Page Location: Houston, TX

These hand-drawn renderings of a transformed section of Houston’s former elevated freeway were a strategic choice to generate interest and dialogue in the project by conveying a sense that the concept was still “in progress” and open to feedback.

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Olson Kundig Owner/Principal Alan Maskin wins Jewish Museum Berlin Foundation competition

Today it was announced Olson Kundig Owner/Principal Alan Maskin would design the Jewish Museum Berlin Foundation’s new Kindermuseum. Aimed at five- to twelve-year-olds, the Kindermuseum will sit within an old wholesale flower market, which is itself located between the Daniel Libeskind-designed Academy of the Jewish Museum and the museum's administrative offices. According to a recent release, the museum has a €3.44 million budget, with an additional €2.11 million going toward creating the exhibition. Maskin's proposal was chosen from twelve invitees after two rounds of jury selections, the first of which took place in late April. His design will focus on the story of Noah's Ark: “The design by Olson Kundig has the potential to unpack the biblical story in all its relevance, as well as building connections with the present day―rescuing people and animals, the relationship between nature and civilization, and the chance to make new beginnings,” said Peter Schäfer, director of the Jewish Museum, in a press release. The jury added that, in Maskin's proposal, “The scenography is extremely attractive and professional in terms of museum pedagogy. Its use of the Noah’s Ark motif playfully picks up on topical and relevant themes such as diversity, migration, creation, second chances, and new beginnings. The visitor is Noah, and can experience the multiple facets of these topics―on their own or in interaction and role-play.” This is the second win for Olson Kundig in an international competition this year: the firm took first place in Blank Space's  “Fairy Tales 2016" back in April.
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Olson Kundig launches creative residency program

Seattle-based firm Olson Kundig has announced a residency program for one lucky creative collaborator. While the firm is largely known for its residential work, kinetic architecture, and nature-focused design, Olson Kundig has a longstanding history of collaborations with artists. “‘What can we do together that we can’t do apart?’ This spirit is not only part of how we work with our collaborators, but also part of our fundamental office culture of critique and community,” said Olson Kundig principal and owner Alan Maskin in a press release. Whoever is selected for the ‘Creative Exchange Residency Program’ will be awarded a $10,000 grant and integrated into the office for two to four weeks. The exact objective of the collaboration seems flexible, though the website mandates that the resident will "give a presentation to our office during one of our weekly Monday morning meetings," be "responsible for the cost of materials during residency," and be "responsible for travel and accommodations while participating in the residency." Applications will be accepted until August 1.
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Olson Kundig is designing a new home for the Burke Museum

The oldest state museum in Washington state—the Burke Museum at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle’s U District—will get a new home slated to open in 2019. Seattle-based Olson Kundig is designing the new building for the museum that centers on natural history and culture. Construction started last week on the new museum at 15th Avenue NE. The site neighbors the existing museum building at NE 45th Street and 17th Avenue NE. The new museum design opens up and unites the collection galleries, labs, research, education, and storage areas. The 113,000 square foot building will have 60% more space—breathing room for the over 16 million scientific and cultural objects from the Pacific Northwest and beyond. Olson Kundig's design weaves in Northwest elements, such as wood siding and a shed-style roof. “The University of Washington and Burke Museum were incredibly important to me during my student life, and the Burke was a place for me to engage with and connect to our rich local history and tradition of innovation,” Tom Kundig, Principal and Owner of Olson Kundig, said in a statement. The museum has called many different places home. In 1879 a group of Seattle naturalists started collecting historical and scientific objects. They hosted them at the University of Washington, when the university was downtown at University Street and Fourth Avenue (what is now part of the Metropolitan Tract owned by the University). Then in 1899, the Washington state legislature designated the museum an official state museum. The Burke later moved to northeast Seattle, finally settling in the current space at NE 45th Street in 1962. “The new facility will allow us to take science and cultural education to the next level by connecting students with the scientists and researchers at the Burke—role models who will inspire the next generation,” said Frank Chopp (who, incidentally, designed and built these two urban cabins with his father in Seattle's Central District), Washington State Speaker of the House (43rd LD) in a statement. Over the years, remodeling the Burke building became less financially feasible. Storage space was tight and lacked climate-control protections. The old museum will be demolished once move-in is complete to make way for the landscape design and parking. Demolition includes the Burke Café. A conservator will remove the cafe's circa 1720s wood paneling. The new Burke will display a portion of the paneling. Another local Seattle firm is leading the landscape design. Guthrie Gustafson Nichol (GGN) is creating the courtyard and entryway filled with native plant species. Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center in Carnation is growing the close to 70,000 native plants needed for the project. For every two trees removed, the design will add three trees. The University of Washington and Burke officials hope to reuse some of the wood in the construction. “The landscape of the New Burke is designed to be as multifaceted and welcoming as the museum,” said Shannon Nichol, GGN founding principal in a statement. “It will serve as a new campus quad, a colorful garden experience, and a living emblem of our state’s natural heritage.” The project budget is $99 million with the majority of funding coming from Washington State, with additional support from private gifts, University of Washington, as well as in-kind donations.
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Olson Kundig designs pigeon lofts for Duke Riley’s “Fly By Night” performances in the Brooklyn Navy Yard

For those living in or visiting New York City this May and June, the Seattle-based firm Olson Kundig is partnering with the Brooklyn-based artist Duke Riley on a weekend public art performance and installation piece, Fly By Nightin the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Event tickets are sold out, but there is a waitlist.) The non-profit arts organization, Creative Time, commissioned the piece. At dusk on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays through June 12, the artist will awaken a flock of close to 2,000 pigeons living in a group of Olson Kundig-designed pigeon lofts resting on the docked and decommissioned Navy ship, the Baylander. The artist outfitted the pigeons with glowing LED leg bands. "We raise a flag and the birds then know to take off and start flying in different patterns," Riley told the New York Times in a short video. https://vimeo.com/164326694 Riley was inspired by the site's former use as the military's largest pigeon coop. During World War II, the military used pigeons to deliver messages in the dead of night, with some pigeons traveling up to 600 miles in a single flight. “The artist has a clear love for these pigeons and it came across in the design thinking behind the pigeon coops," said Olson Kundig Associate Kristen Becker, who worked with Riley on the pigeon lofts, in a statement. "The idea that the coops were designed to exist beyond the performance resonates in the way in which we detailed the piece. Each coop bay was designed not only to be installed quickly but also to be dismantled to be reused and donated as individual coops afterwards. Instead of thinking of it as one building—we thought about it as a series of buildings." After around 30 minutes, Riley calls the pigeons home with a whistle. Becker also designed 25 bird houses, taking cues from the Fly by Night pigeon lofts, for the April 28 Creative Time Gala, to help raise funds for free public access to art.
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Seattle’s most iconic landmark may get an Olson Kundig makeover

Now over half a century old, there is talk of renovating the Seattle Space Needle. It hosts over one million visitors a year eager to ride the elevator 520 feet up to the observation deck or to dine in the revolving restaurant. The details? Space Needle owners are considering adding a glass floor to the restaurant so diners could see how the space rotates, reports The Puget Sound Business Journal. There are also other ideas: two-story elevators, bringing in more glass for the observation deck for better views, an interior refresh, and repainting. A local Seattle-based firm, Olson Kundig, is reportedly part of the team designing the upgrades. Given the importance of the building (and the Seattle process) many of these proposed changes could be several years out. The Architectural Review Committee must first give the green light, before these ideas could move forward.
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Olson Kundig Merges Western History and Modern Art

Richlite-clad museum expansion inspired by industrial context and Old West art collection.

Commissioned to craft an extension to the Antoine Predock–designed Tacoma Art Museum, Olson Kundig Architects sought inspiration in both the history of the site and the art collection itself. Located in the city's Union Depot/Warehouse historic district, the museum is surrounded by brick buildings formerly dedicated to industry and transportation. "The new addition needed to respond to both the neighborhood context as well as the existing building," explained design principal Tom Kundig. "It has clean lines that recall the existing structure but recalls more directly the natural, earthy materials found in the neighborhood." In contrast to the stainless steel-clad original wing, which houses the museum's modern art collection, the new wing—dedicated to the art of the American West—is wrapped in layers of Richlite sunscreens. "The addition's use of exterior shutters references symbols of the American West—fences, filtered barn light, and railroad box cars," said Kundig. "It's fitting that the Haub Family's Western American Art collection now sits at the westernmost terminus of the rail line established by President Lincoln."
  • Facade Manufacturer Richlite (cladding and sunscreens), Kawneer (glazing)
  • Architects Olson Kundig Architects
  • Facade Installer Raymond-Northwest (Richlite), Eastside Glass (glazing), McKinstry (aluminum and stainless steel)
  • Location Tacoma, WA
  • Date of Completion November 24
  • System aluminum and reused stainless steel canopy, Richlite panels, Richlite fixed and operable sunscreens over curtain wall
  • Products Richlite Rainshadow, Kawneer 1600 Curtain Wall, Kawneer 350 HW Doors
A new 30-foot-high canopy serves as the junction of the museum's old and new wings, and creates an exterior gathering space for museumgoers. "The intersection between the existing building's modern collection and the new structure's western art collection became the focal point of a new museum experience," explained Kundig. Built from a combination of aluminum grating and stainless steel panels reused from demolished portions of the original structure, the canopy's material palette mediates the gap between the architectural languages of the two spaces. It also suggests a seamless integration into the Predock-designed building, despite the fact that it is structurally isolated for seismic safety. For the exterior of the new galleries, Olson Kundig chose Richlite, an earth-toned composite product made from waste paper and resin, both because it is locally manufactured, and as a reference to Tacoma's lumber industry. The architects used Richlite in two forms: as panels for straightforward cladding; and as dimensional lumber to build overlapping sets of shutters. Comprising both fixed and operable screens, the shading system controls the amount of sunlight that enters the galleries and allows museum staff to adjust visibility into and out of the building. The moveable screen panels, each 16 feet 4 inches wide by 16 feet 6 inches tall, are controlled by a hand crank located in the lobby. The Tacoma Art Museum expansion project held special meaning for Kundig, whose firm is located in Seattle. "Tacoma is an important part of our local community, so it was deeply important for me to create something significant in this place with so much history," he said. "That the project is a Western art collection adjacent to a modern art collection, is incredibly exciting. It's an opportunity to explore the similarities and differences in American art, to examine our history and contemplate our future."
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The Final Turn: Architect Tom Kundig Designs a Minimal Funerary Urn

While few items should garner as much respect as those of which hold the memories of our loved ones, high-design has long had an aversion to memorialization. Seattle-based architect Tom Kundig of Olson Kundig Architects and artist Greg Lundgren hope to change that with their new funerary urn, "The Final Turn," for Lundgren Monuments. With this object, Kundig brings the rough materiality and crisp design that he has become known for with his acclaimed houses to create a timeless vessel. "The Final Turn" is composed of two halves of an eight-inch sphere, handcrafted from blackened steel or bronze. The two halves are threaded together, but are noticeably offset when they meet. "While the sphere implies perfection and eternity, the offset nature of the urn is inspired by the people left behind—the people whose lives are thrown off-kilter by the passing of their loved one," Kundig said in a statement. "The perfect world is no longer perfect for those who remain—something is amiss." The top half contains a compartment to house mementos, while the bottom half provides a receptacle for remains.
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Art Central At UC Davis

The University of California Davis is becoming a cultural force. The school already has three art museums (and arts alums include artist Bruce Nauman and sculptor Deborah Butterfield), and is getting ready to add another, just releasing the shortlist for its new Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art. The list is impressive, including the following design/build teams: wHYArchitecture and Gensler with BNBT Builders; HGA and DPR; Allied Works with Hathaway Dinwiddie; Westlake, Kitchell, WORK; Gould Evans, Henning Larsen, Oliver; Olson Kundig, Olveraa; and Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, SO-IL, Whiting Turner. The list was culled from an initial list of 19. The 40,000 square foot museum, located on a 1.6 acre site that is part of a long-range master plan for the university’s new south entrance, is slated for completion in 2015,