Posts tagged with "office":

Irish retrofit rediscovers golden rectangle proportioning systems

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Located in Dublin’s historic D4 district, Eaton House serves as Eaton Corporation’s new global headquarters. It is located in an early 19th-century Georgian neighborhood containing a mix of residences, small businesses, parks, and embassies. The project occupies the site of five original terrace houses dating to 1830. A new building replaced these houses in 1970 following their demolition.
  • Facade Manufacturer Poesia (glass brick); Savema S.P.A. (stone fabricator)
  • Architects Pickard Chilton (Design Architect); MCA Architects (Executive Architect); KA Architecture (Interior Design Architect)
  • Facade Installer Duggan Systems (window wall and glass brick); Eiregramco Ltd. (stone installer); John Sisk & Son Ltd. (general contractor)
  • Facade Consultants Barrett Mahony Consulting Engineers (structural); Meehan Associates (sustainability)
  • Location Dublin, Ireland
  • Date of Completion 2016
  • System adaptive reuse of 1970’s reinforced concrete frame structure
  • Products Arandis granite stone sourced in Namibia; custom hand-cast glass block, PPG Kynar finish on custom aluminum “portal” frames
This project, led by Pickard Chilton, was an extensive reuse of the existing 33,000-square-foot concrete frame structure. The architects designed the building retrofit to be of its time while respectful of its historical context, re-envisioning the exterior enclosure in linear coursed stone, clear vision glass, and handmade cast glass bricks. "One of the most important aspects of the facade design process was that this did not replicate the historical context,” said William Chilton, principal at Pickard Chilton. “The city was a great partner in this effort." The architects worked with the neighborhood community and city regulatory agencies throughout the design process to deliver the project. This involved meeting with historic oversight committees very early on in the process before a design was ever proposed. In parallel to this effort, and continuing through the design phases, the architects set regular meetings with residents in the neighborhood. Chilton said these conversations produced a healthy dialogue with the community which helped to inform the design process. "This was a very intense regulatory process, but ultimately very satisfying. The embrace of this project by the community has been particularly gratifying."
Once the overall design strategy was confirmed, the design process was executed very quickly over the course of a few months. An analysis of the original terrace houses revealed the facades were organized based on the golden rectangle.  The composition of the new facade works within the constraints of the existing 1970’s concrete frame while reflecting the original 19th-century terrace houses in its organization, with clear glass openings recognizing the original golden rectangle proportions. The architects realized these openings would actually decrease the amount of daylight that had been admitted into the building. To maintain their specific proportional composition, but introduce more daylight, the architects introduced cast glass into the facade composition after discovering the durable material was historically integrated into sidewalks in the neighborhood to admit daylight into basement spaces. The glass blocks were handmade to specific dimensions which coordinated with the proportions of the stone coursing dimensions so that mortar lines in the masonry facade would translate uninterrupted into the window composition. The effort led to a more open, productive work environment, improving daylight by 38 percent and helping the project to achieve a LEED-NC Gold rating. The cast glass bricks sit recessed within a secondary frame. Insulated glazing installed to the interior side of the cast glass to ensure thermal continuity without disrupting the unique hand-crafted aesthetic. The glass blocks are supported every few courses with horizontal metal rods. When looking from the interior, this tectonic assembly disappears. "An enormous amount of energy spent around the detailing to make this work,” said Ben Simmons, an associate at Pickard Chilton. “There wasn't a precedent we could look towards." MCA Architects collaborated closely with Pickard Chilton from the onset of the project to execute key exterior enclosure and glazing details like this. The materiality of the primary facade challenged conventional thinking about "historic" materials. After a mock-up comparing brick with a granite stone material, the architects convinced regulatory agencies and the owners to proceed with stone. In the spirit of the historically sensitive project, the installer worked closely with the architects on installation details focused on traditional hand-laid masonry construction craft. Metallic-coated aluminum "portal" frames offer a subtle luster to daylight reflecting off windows, adding a dynamic quality to the facade. This, paired with the sheen of a stone that resembles an iron spot brick, offers a facade that more dynamically responds throughout variable daylighting conditions. Eaton House has been recognized with four AIA awards, including an inaugural award from AIA Europe. "The project was diminutive in size, but quite significant in terms of its impact," said Chilton. "By doing this project, it really opened our eyes to the potential for this type of re-envisioning work. This was the smallest project we've ever done. It underscored our interest and commitment to seeking out projects of quality no matter the scale. If it's an interesting design problem, and the client has aspirations of quality, then we are all in."

How R/GA is designing the office of the future

Walk around R/GA's (formerly R/Greenberg Associates) New York office and it's tough not to be wooed by the tech running the show. Despite this, however, the environment is decidedly democratic rather than technocratic. Spread across the 11th and 12th floors of 450 West 33rd Street, R/GA's New York HQ sits within 200,000 square feet of office space. The term "office space" is more appropriate than "offices" because the latter implies a series of segmented workplace zones, typically walled or cordoned. With R/GA, office furniture has wheels to move around the open plan found on the 12th floor, which is also the entry level. "I didn't see any difference between an architecture firm and a law firm," said founder and CEO of R/GA Bob Greenberg, speaking in a Gary Hustwit-made documentary about his firm. He wanted to create an environment "where the digital landscape would integrate with physical space." And now Greenberg has 450 West 33rd Street: a former brutalist block, designed by Davis Brody Bond in 1969 that has been re-skinned by Joshua Prince-Ramus (REX) and gutted on R/GA's two floors by Foster + Partners. On the 12th floor, conference "rooms" have no walls. Instead, they're round tables (with wheels, of course) wired up to hidden power outlets and surrounded by high chairs. Zones are denoted by color, letters, and numbers. It feels a bit like moving around an airport, though Greenberg's collection of art, transit, and technological nostalgia make useful wayfinding devices. Screens display product and marketing information and welcome messages for visitors. Everything is modular—even the floor can be taken up. The system works through a Unistrut canopy from which all manner of devices—such as the aforementioned sensors—hang from. The blockbuster feature, however, is that everything can be controlled by an app. Conference "rooms" can be booked, lights changed, art can be identified (just point your camera at it), and audio of the video being played on screens can be easily accessed. A geolocation service—using sensors dotted around the space—also runs at a granular scale to aid navigation. R/GA's aim is for a fluid, versatile and connected environment. Though still being refined, they developed this beta office model for themselves and deliver it as a tailored product primed for startups. In fact, R/GA supplies a tech-based incubator for blossoming firms looking for guidance, direction and of course, funding. Daniel Diez is R/GA's executive vice president and global chief marketing officer. He works closely with managing directors and senior leadership across all R/GA offices, leading marketing and communications strategies and thus he has a hand in all R/GA's projects. Diez will be speaking about R/GA's work at The Architect's Newspaper's upcoming Tech+ conference. The event will be at Metropolitan West on 639 West 46th Street in Manhattan on May 23. To register and find out more, visit techplusexpo.com.

2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Workplace: Square, Inc. HQ by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Workplace: Square, Inc. Headquarters Architect: Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Location: San Francisco, CA

To tackle the challenge of making four floors of a windowless 1970s data center reflect the contemporary culture of Square, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson organized the company’s headquarters around a central collaborative space punctuated by a library, a coffee bar, and a gallery—anchored by a monumental amphitheater staircase that itself functions as a flexible venue for a variety of activities. Custom white tables further enhance the stair’s visual appeal while encouraging dynamic use. The concept’s clean lines and predominantly white interiors reflect Square’s brand at both aesthetic and functional levels, successfully transforming the space while highlighting the company’s core values to create a refined, seamless experience.

Contractor BCCI Builders

Structural Engineer Tipping Structural Engineers Millworker San Francisco Millwork Lighting Manufacturer Vodes Custom Furniture Manufacturer Ohio Design

Honorable Mention, Interior > Workplace: Pinterest Headquarters

Architect: IwamotoScott Architecture with Brereton Architects Location: San Francisco, CA

Inspired by the clean, simple, and intuitive ethos of Pinterest’s recent web platform redesign, IwamotoScott Architecture and Brereton Architects envisioned a concept of porous concentric layers wrapping a repurposed warehouse atrium.

Honorable Mention, Interior > Workplace: Squarespace Global Headquarters

Architect: Architecture Plus Information (A+I) Location: New York, NY

To honor its client’s aesthetic commitment to minimalism, A+I sought to bring depth, texture, and warmth to the Squarespace headquarters in New York’s historic Maltz Building through a purposeful variety of spaces and the use of natural materials: polished concrete, wood, and leather.

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson transforms data center into open, flexible office for Square

Whether or not we’ve realized it, most of us have bought products through Square, a company that supplies small businesses with the now-ubiquitous square-shaped hardware and software that remotely processes credit card payments. Square’s new offices in San Francisco are meant to be as minimal, clear, and usable as its products.

Located in what was once a miserable, almost completely windowless Bank of America data center, the new 300,000-square-foot, fourth-floor office is just the opposite: an open, light-filled workspace organized by a central “boulevard,” lined with gathering spaces (including a library, gallery, and cafe), and a wide variety of working spaces, including bench-style work desks, tables, and semi-private, acoustically lined “work cabanas.”

To manage the space’s ridiculously big floor plates (100,000 square feet, four times the typical size), according to Bohlin Cywinski Jackson (BCJ) principal Gregory Mottola, the firm studied urban precedents as varied as Dubrovnik and Milan, looking at everything from urban plazas to enclosed arcades. Unifying the office floors is a massive amphitheater stair that cuts through floors six, seven, and eight, and provides zones for individual work, group meetings, and large presentations. The stair is fitted with movable, lightweight powder-coated tables that snake their way down its length to create unique working and relaxing environments. Another office anchor is the eighth and ninth floor “Square Stair,” a floating switchback connecting the office floor to the main dining level.

“You’re giving up rentable floor area, but the payoff is you have these incredible group amenities,” said Mottola. “The key was this idea of creating a really collaborative, transparent company. You don’t want to have one place feel disconnected from the rest.”

Clean lines and lots of white (on steel panels, stretch-fabric ceiling panels, and drywalls) reflect the brand’s identity and lightens the mood, while salvaged wood elements, like the eucalyptus amphitheater stair, Plyboo cabanas, and end-grain woodblock flooring in the lobby, provide warmth and visual interest. Splashes of color demarcate important spaces, provide needed accents, and reflect the locale: Bright orange, for instance, recalls the Golden Gate Bridge, while blue shades evoke the nearby San Francisco Bay. The company installed new windows along the perimeters of the sixth, seventh, and eighth floors, drawing in natural light where there once had been none. Another big aspect of the design within a limited budget was lighting. BCJ employed a variety of techniques, from spear-shaped “light saber” LEDs above the boulevard to indirect lighting in the workstations and sculptural accent pendants in the lounge spaces.

“We tried to make the most of those dramatic moments when we could,” said Mottola, who noted that Square was drawn to BCJ’s clean work for Apple’s stores, but not its purely monochrome palette. As the company grows at an exponential rate, the airy, collaborative, and flexible spaces will no doubt come in handy. “We want them to be able to grow and shift over time,” he added.

Perkins+Will balances a high-tech aesthetic with coziness and craft in this Chicago office

Prescient’s new office in the Prudential 1 Tower in Chicago is exactly what you might expect from a high-tech global security firm’s office, and a bit of what you might not. Designed by Chicago-based Perkins+Will, the space is specifically designed to facilitate both human and technological collaborations.

Transparency may not be the first thing that comes to mind when thinking about a security firm, yet Prescient’s office is predominantly an open space: The main area of the office is filled with staggered standing desks, and there are glass-encased break-out areas around the periphery. Framed windows that once made up the former exterior facade of the building are now used as dividers and are specially coated to act as transparent dry-erase boards for impromptu conversations and meetings. Along with the open lunchroom and break areas, the entire space is specifically designed to encourage free interaction between all of the employees.

“We use elegant technology coupled with human analysis to identify and manage threats for our clients,” Prescient CEO David Walsh explained. “Our vision for the office was to be able to stand anywhere and take measure of the energy of an adaptable, team-oriented company in a space that fosters collaboration and transparency.”

Along with the spatial considerations of the office, material details play an important role in Perkins+Will’s design. At the entrance, a continuous line of fluorescent light fixtures guides visitors to the reception area. The linear lighting and corresponding linear detailing throughout the space is a nod to the movement of digital information. In addition to the extensive use of glass, steel and walnut make up much of the designed surfaces and furniture. Perkins+Will worked closely with small Chicago-based furniture maker Modified Originals on using an extensive amount of reclaimed wood for the custom furniture. Other custom components were designed by Perkins+Will and built by MTH Industries and Imperial Woodworking. The design called for exposing the ceiling and brick of the original 1955 modernist office tower to contrast with the clean lines of the new dark finishes. The result is a high-tech, loft-like space with expansive views of Millennium Park.

“The clients wanted to have a sleek modern office that communicated strength and stability, but still had a feeling of warmth and comfort,” Perkins+Will associate principal Eric J. Mersmann said. “This balance was achieved with the use of the hot-rolled steel panels and concrete floors combined with the liberal use of reclaimed wood paneling, reclaimed wood on the furniture, and pops of bright color in the casual furniture.”

Not all of the office is bright and open, though. Dedicated to Prescient Traveler, one the company’s main offerings, a hushed, dimly blue-lit amphitheater is dominated by a full-wall digital display of the world. Here, employees monitor international security issues 24 hours a day.

From the more serious Prescient Traveler space to the more casual and comfortable meeting areas, every part of the design is an aspect of Prescient’s new brand. The company specifically moved from the more suburban McLean, Virginia, outside of Washington, D.C., to this highly visible space in downtown Chicago to complete its new image. Not only does the space bring the company in closer contact to a bustling commercial center, its newly designed officealso plays a role in attracting the best young tech workers, who often expect to be able to live in an urban area. With their new office, those young tech workers can watch over clients while also enjoying one of the most envied views in the city.

Resources

General Contractor Clune Construction Project Management The 4M Group MEP Engineers Kent Consulting Engineers Custom Furniture Modified Originals Furniture Arper Lighting Metalumen Carpet Interface

Blinds for walls? ASH NYC installation rethinks conventions of contemporary office decor

Turning mirrors into ceilings, tables into flooring, and blinds into walls, Brooklyn-based design and development firm ASH NYC isn't playing by the standard rules of workspace design. Known for mixing chic interior design and property development, the firm exhibited Office Space at this year's Collective Design held in New York earlier this month.

Covering 1,250 square feet, their installation was situated in the VIP lounge and café at the fair featuring a 60 foot long modular table named Office Table that was made using reclaimed heart pinewood used for the new floors at the Whitney Museum.

Connecting the lounge to the cafe within the fair, the space was encapsulated by an extensive horizontal blind system that doubled up as walls. Also tracing the space's perimeter, an array of sculptural seating cubes—or Office Chairs—offered gathering spaces for visitors to the exhibit.

Keeping with furniture, ASH also produced a limited-edition WC4 chair that was available for purchase on-site. These chairs were interspersed within the vicinity alongside planting that offered a natural counter to the prefabricated space.

A dropped ceiling was also incorporated into the design, employing ceiling panels wrapped in reflective mylar to articulate space seldom—if at all seen in office environments.

Rafael Viñoly gears up redesign of office space on Manhattan’s Auto Row

Rafael Viñoly Architects will lead the redesign of—and two-floor addition to—an office building at 787 11th Avenue on Manhattan's "Auto Row." Viñoly's $100 million renovation will add 86,000 square feet of office space over two floors to the 10-story building, owned by the Georgetown Company. The additions will bring the structure's size to over half a million square feet. The work space, recessed from the building's original footprint, will have wide open floor plates and oversize windows to flood the space with natural light. Renovations will include a two-story penthouse and a 12,000-square-foot roof deck, accessible only to office tenants. Currently, Jaguar Land Rover, Nissan, and Infiniti have showrooms and offices in the space; post-renovation, BNF Automotive Group and Nissan North America will lease 265,000 square feet for their flagships on the building's lower floors. Viñoly, whose recent New York projects include the Rockefeller University Campus Master Plan and supertall 432 Park Avenue, offered unvarnished praise for the developers in a statement. He added: “The opportunity to combine the building’s historic architecture with a sleek and modern design is one I could not pass up.” The building is one of many new projects outside of Hudson Yards to blossom on Manhattan's Far West Side. A block away from Hudson River Park and the West Side Highway, tenants will have access to a private subway shuttle service, and a CitiBike station across the street. Work is expected to be complete by the end of 2017.

Gary Hustwit’s new film documents Foster + Partners’ transformation of the workplace

Gary Hustwit, the director of documentaries Helvetica, Objectified, and Urbanized, has announced a new film, Workplace, in time for the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale. Workplace follows the design and construction of R/GA's New York City headquarters. R/GA is one of the world's most prominent advertising agencies, with offices in 15 cities worldwide. Since its founding more than four decades ago, the agency has contributed to more than 400 feature films and over 4,000 television commercials. In collaboration with Foster + Partners, the agency spent a year and a half thinking about how to synthesize digital and physical space for a more harmonious office environment that facilitates collaboration and connects offices to the world outside. Hustwit explains that the theme of the documentary—improving office space—coincides perfectly with the Biennale's theme, "Reporting from the Front." In the words of Biennale director Alejandro Aravena: “There are several battles that need to be won and several frontiers that need to be expanded in order to improve the quality of the built environment and consequently people’s quality of life. We will present cases and practices where creativity was used to take the risk to go even for a tiny victory, because when the problem is big, just a one-millimeter improvement is relevant.” If this sounds familiar, it's because myriad firms, environmental psychologists, and student projects have tried to "rethink the office" already. It remains to be seen what Foster + Partners, with their experience designing workspaces for London's Bloomberg headquarters and San Francisco's Oceanwide Center, among others, will contribute to the conversation. At this time, no images of the office's interiors are available online. The film will premiere at the Biennale, and run from May 28 through November 27.

PLP reveals Nexus Tower, a high rise without a central core, in China’s Pearl River Delta

Only six years old, London-based architecture firm PLP formed as a break away from KPF. Despite its age, the firm already has some noteworthy projects under its belt including the award winning The Edge in Amsterdam. Principals David Leventhal and Andrei Martin have recently designed one more, the Nexus Tower in the Pearl River Delta in China. The skyscraper comprises three stacked volumes, all of which are oriented differently upon a central axis acting as an elevator shaft. Martin is quick to say that this is not the core of the building, explaining that each volume has it's own core, situated on its outer edge. Such a feature "challenges the central core [office] typology," explained Martin. The Nexus Tower boasts quadruple-height informal spaces, all clad in glass, so that incumbent offices can advertise (for free) to passers by how much "fun" their employees are having. Exterior elevator shafts on each volume's "core" also aid legibility. This allows the public to witness inter-floor circulation as elevators travel up and down the facade, giving the impression of activity within the building. Set to rise 1,968 feet, the Nexus Tower will be the tallest of the structures within PLP's larger master plan. Other structures include The Platform for Contemporary Arts, a performing arts complex; The LZ Park Tower, a 984-foot office tower; and The Concoursea large scale retail and leisure facility. Height and the lateral loads the tower must sustain were heavily influential in the design of the Nexus Tower. By fanning out the volumes, lateral loads could be divided up, reducing the overall impact. This also gave the building some visual diversity too, with each volume having a different view out over the city, mountains, and suburbs. The subsequent roof areas were adapted as terracing and green spaces. There is currently no construction timetable for the tower.

In the office of the future, you can ride your bike to your desk, says global architecture firm NBBJ

In pondering the post-2025 office of the future, global architecture firm NBBJ believes in the power of "nudge architecture" as a counterpoint to alienating corporate culture and sedentary cubicle lifestyles. Asked by Fast Company to envisage the workplace a decade from now, the firm responded with a design where fitness and face-to-face social interactions are at the forefront. The firm projected bike paths throughout the building that would allow workers to ride their bikes right up to their desks, with ramps at every entrance. “The key ingredient is mobility, as we’re going to be wearing our computers, screens and everything else,” said NBBJ chair and partner Scott Wyatt. “But even today we have spectacular mobility as we aren’t chained to desks, file cabinets and computers. We can start to create spaces that better respond to human needs.” In a bid to dissipate hierarchical divides, stairs and elevators will be eliminated in favor of building atop a seamless, switch-backing incline. This graded layout means no more ensconcing of respective departments – Finance, HR, Management and Sales will have to learn to tolerate one another’s society. Ramps leading from one staggered “level” to the next create “extensive sight lines” where co-workers have more opportunity to interact, maintains NBBJ. According to Fast Company, the idea riffs off the long-held ‘Allen Curve’ theory, which estimates that workers are four times more likely to communicate with someone who is six feet away than a colleague who is 60 feet away, and unlikely to ever debrief at the water cooler with someone on another floor. The firm’s more conventional suggestions include bringing the outdoors indoors with exposure to indoor plants and natural light. There is talk of using dynamically shaded glass that adapts to changes in brightness gradations – which could allow for an all-glass edifice (roof included). NBBJ gets sci-fi creative with its suggestions of a building that is entirely responsive to user’s needs. As an example, the firm envisions sensors that differentiate between quiet and loud zones. This information is then relayed to a computer that shifts the floor plates accordingly to shape these spaces in real-time. The firm takes the mobility concept further with conference rooms that not only self-assemble when needed, but can migrate workers around large complexes during meetings so that you don’t need to walk from one building to another in a large campus-style office. The focus is on space-saving economies, said NBBJ partner Ryan Mullenix – and not yet another technological invention providing a ready excuse not to walk. “When you don’t have to fill 50 percent of your space with conference rooms, things can begin to move."

This stack of shipping containers by LOT-EK could become the nomadic coworking office of the future

The future of the mobile office is on its way, and it's blurring the lines between the home and the workplace. Spacious is the name of a "coworking hotel" concept being touted by its founder and CEO, Preston Pesek, as the future of the workplace, combining a traditional coworking space, a hotel, and retail into a giant live, work, play experience. And what better way to house the modern nomadic workforce than shipping containers? New York–based architects at LOT-EK—who designed the coworking space—have built their reputation on living and working inside shipping containers. The firm's principles, Ada Tolla and Giuseppe Lignano, explained on their website that the modular design is organized around a roughly 50-foot-tall central atrium that "opens to the street with a large glazed opening visually connecting to urban life." The massive space helps to uncramp the potentially claustrophobic sensation of typing away inside an 8-foot-6-inch tall container all day long. "The building design is a response to natural human cycles of productivity," Pesek said in an email. "Sometimes we need social interaction for stimulation, and sometimes we need privacy to be productive. The building offers a spectrum of environments for public engagement and quiet privacy, on demand, as needed." Guests can belly up to long, shared desks overlooking the activity of a sort of "public plaza" lined with retail space. Members can also choose a private bedroom/office combo. Each 8-foot-by-40-foot shipping container can hold two bedrooms and bathrooms that convert into offices by folding beds up against the wall. Two shipping containers can be combined to create larger rooms. Pesek's promotional website said repurposing shipping containers is a sustainability and financial no-brainer. Each container ranges from $2,800 to $4,000—and diagrams show upwards of 80 would be needed. That cuts down on the cost of raw materials, leaving more room in the budget for sprucing up the interior. Details on the project's website let the renderings do most of the talking, but it does explain that Spacious is all about reducing temporally wasted space—and, in turn, bring down real estate prices. "Our daily movements create vacancy gaps in the spaces where we live, work, and play," the site reads. "Even the densest cities reveal an abundance of available, usable spaces hiding just under the surface." Members would be able to book the secure hotel rooms—with full hotel amenities—on demand. And if you venture out during the day, you can earn a rebate by loaning your room to others. The larger coworking space would be open to anyone in need of coffee, doughnuts, and some free wifi. You likely won't be able to plug into your local Spacious any time soon, however. A location for the New York City flagship has not been announced, and Pesek said it's too early to disclose details about a timeline. Spacious still plans to ship out its concept to other cities in the future. [via Motherboard.]

East Williamsburg will soon have its own multi-use co-working space for creatives

As multi-use, coworking-type spaces continue to be all the rage, East Williamsburg is hopping on the bandwagon with a tentatively named ‘Morgantown’ creative community. Planned on an industrial lot on Johnson Avenue, the large complex will comprise office spaces, a retail corridor, rooftop dining, and communal courtyards. An “on-site artisanal food production space” is also in the works and will be located at the courtyards planned on Bogart and White Street, according to brokerage firm TerraCRG, which represents the property owner. The lot will have more than 40,000 square feet of outdoor space and over 23,000 square feet of office space, not including retail. The lot was the former headquarters of commercial printing company A.J. Bart, which recently sold the land plot for $26.75 million. The structure is projected to be three stories tall, according to DTZ, the commercial real estate firm responsible for attracting tenants. According to renderings, a mural will cover an entire wall facing Johnson Avenue. Construction of the complex is starting immediately, with a projected completion date of early 2016. Tenants, however, should be free to move in starting late this year.