Posts tagged with "Office of Metropolitan Architecture":

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Mia Lehrer selected to design L.A.’s FaB Park

The team led by Mia Lehrer and Associates (MLA), in partnership with Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) and design innovation firm IDEO, was selected by the City of Los Angeles this morning to design the new $12 million public park located at the intersection of First and Broadway in Downtown Los Angeles. MLA’s proposal for the so-called FaB Park utilizes a mix of meadows, gardens, and terraces packed with native plantings and mature oak trees to create a shady “California oaklands” landscape that can handle and capture all on-site stormwater for treatment and infiltration. The design also features a large, split-level structure with amphitheater seating designed by OMA that will be programmed by IDEO with public events focusing on food and entertainment. The structure injects a sizable commercial element into the scheme and features and associated beer garden and test kitchen. Towering, leaf-shaped shade structures dot the central plaza adjacent to the restaurant and amphitheater and aim to distribute shade across the unplanted portions of the scheme. The plaza will be accessed from a variety of approaches connecting to surrounding sidewalks, each of which frames one of the scheme’s signature gardens. A paseo will runs across the site from the corner of First and Broadway to Spring Street and City Hall and cuts through the plaza. The park aims to not only create place of respite in one of downtown’s most symbolic sites, but also to connect foot traffic between the Rios, Clementi, Hale Studios-designed Grand Park adjacent to FaB Park, City Hall, and the Los Angeles Times headquarters, and new SOM-designed United States Courthouse across the street. FaB Park is the second major park-related development in the neighborhood, with the Agence Ter and SALT-designed, minimalist proposal for the blighted Pershing Square sitting just four blocks away released just a few weeks ago.
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Weird, but not so wonderful, says China as it bans “weird” architecture

Question: What has three Arcs de Triomphe, an Eiffel Tower, an Egyptian Sphynx, a Louvre, London Bridge and ten White Houses all over? The answer: China, of course. If the Chinese government has its way, that will soon change.

https://twitter.com/TheMCRsoviet/status/632080629048459264

The duplicate architectural icons may end there as the country's authorities have said no to anymore "oversized, xenocentric, weird" architecture, The New York Times reports. The State Council and the Communist Party’s Central Committee last week stated that there is to essentially be no more copycat architecture, and instead urged new builds to be “suitable, economic, green and pleasing to the eye.” The directive also stipulated that "the chaotic propagation of grandiose, West-worshipping, weird architecture" should be ended, while gated communities have also been vetoed.

Guidelines arose after meetings discussed issues regarding the alarming rate of urbanization that China is undergoing. Just two years ago, President Xi Jinping expressed his views on China's architectural scene, again deeming it "weird" saying there was to be "no more weird architecture." He went on to say that the current climate displayed "a lack of cultural confidence and some city officials’ distorted attitudes about political achievements," though only now does action appear to be being taken.

According to a translation by the Wall Street Journal Blog, Yang Baojun, vice director of the China Academy of Urban Planning and Design (CAUPA), commented on the directive, saying that "the document is a wake-up call for those places where [there has been] a one-sided pursuit of architectural form over function, where cultural orientation has been compromised by an excessive desire to show off."

The New York Times meanwhile reports that experts have warned of "stricter design standards for public buildings." It also added that, an online forum for the Communist Party newspaper, People's Dailypredicted that "in the future it is unlikely that Beijing will have other strangely shaped buildings like the ‘Giant Trousers’ " referring to the China Central Television Headquarters (CCTV) by OMA.

Feng Guochuan, an architect based in Shenzhen spoke about how the President Xi's words had already begun to have an impact on decision making regarding new projects. He was also worried that Xi was meddling with matters that should only concern urban planners, and not the President. "Generally speaking, local governments now tend to approve more conservative designs," he said.

https://twitter.com/DanLewisNews/status/243113209974890496?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

However, Wang Kai, vice president of CAUPA, said these stricture design guidelines would mainly be applied to public schemes, while private projects would still have freedom. "For private housing or commercial projects, there is still space for innovation."

Mr. Wang also added that "we shouldn’t go overboard in pursuit of appearances," going on to say how functionality should be the main concern in public buildings.

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OMA merges sport and science in this terraced building for one of England’s elite boarding schools

The Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) announced that its designs for a joint Sports and Sciences department for the UK's Brighton College have been approved. The Rem Koolhaas–owned architecture practice won an invited competition in 2013, and the project was further developed and submitted for planning approval in 2015. The unveiled designs envision a linear building at the edge of the college’s playing field that combines the two departments for a “lively and animated circulation” inside. The primary sporting spaces will be at the same level as the playing field, with the sports hall opening directly onto it. A rooftop running track and basement-level swimming pool are among other expected amenities. Meanwhile, the science department spans over the sporting spaces like a “skeletal” bridge. The facade of the three-story building is inspired by the terraced housing adjacent to the building. As the biggest construction project in the school’s 170-year history, it will form an unexpected interplay between the two academic disciplines. The privately-owned, co-ed boarding and day school, one of Britain’s finest, is composed of two areas: a historical quadrangle hosting Grade II–listed gothic-revival buildings designed by Sir Gilbert Scott and Sir Thomas Jackson in the 19th century, and the playing field bordered by buildings from the 1970s and 1980s, the site of OMA’s new construction. Before building can commence, however, the 1970s sports hall, classroom block, maintenance building, and two-story pavilion must be demolished first. The project forms the final phase of a more than $62 million masterplan, which includes two other new buildings—a boarding house and amenities building by Allies & Morrison.