Posts tagged with "Obituary":

Placeholder Alt Text

Gunter Behnisch, 1922-2010

Word spread yesterday that Dresden-born, Deconstructivist-inspiring architect Günter Behnisch had died. His son's firm, which had taken on much of his work, sent around the following announcement today. There will be a memorial service tomorrow in Stuttgart, Behnisch's long-time home.
Professor Günter Behnisch passed away in the early morning hours of July 12th at the age of 88. A good three years ago he retreated from professional life. Since then he has lived, weakened by several strokes, in his home in Stuttgart-Sillenbuch, where his family cared for him. His practice in Stuttgart-Sillenbuch, which he founded in 1952 (from 1966 onwards called Behnisch & Partner with partners Fritz Auer, Winfried Büxel, Erhard Tränkner and Carlo Weber; later with Winfried Büxel, Manfred Sabatke and Erhard Tränkner) existed until 2008. In the last years of the practice he worked with Manfred Sabatke in the Sillenbuch office. Günter Behnisch stood for the architectural expression of Germany’s transformation into a democratic, freer, and more social society. As an architect active in the years of Germany’s reconstruction he shaped the appearance of schools and universities. Architectural critics described his buildings and facilities for the 20th Olympic Games in Munich, as well as his buildings for the German Parliament in Bonn, as symbols of the “open democracy” of the “Bonner Republik,” and these buildings found widespread international recognition. As an educator Günter Behnisch had a decisive influence on several generations of architects. Through their work and their daily practices his teachings will no doubt, in the years ahead, continue to manifest themselves in a decidedly freer approach to architecture. Through a permanent questioning of the architectural uniformity of the, as he once put it, “self-opinionated” Berlin Republic and its particular definition of architecture, he eventually realized, after a time and energy-consuming planning process, his last project, the Academy of the Arts in Berlin, in 2005. Acknowledging that he would be unable to complete his last successful competition winning entries, Günter Behnisch entrusted his son Stefan with a number of projects—the “Haus im Haus” for Hamburg’s Chamber of Commerce and the Ozeaneum in Stralsund. […Stefan has his own firm, Behnisch Architekten, which had been working in concert with Behnisch & Partner for a number of years. …] During the years of collaboration projects such as the St. Benno Gymnasium in Dresden, the “Museum der Phantasie” for the Buchheim collection in Bernried, the State Insurance Agency Schleswig-Holstein in Lübeck, the service center for the Landesbank Baden-Württemberg in Stuttgart and the office and exhibition building for VS in Tauberbischofsheim were realised. Today many of the staff employed by Behnisch Architekten were previously either students of Günter Behnisch in Darmstadt, where he was a professor, or they worked with him as interns in his office in Stuttgart-Sillenbuch. Günter Behnisch’s approach to architecture, in particular with respect to his ‘idea of man,’ continue to influence our daily activities.
Placeholder Alt Text

Remembering Charles Gwathmey

Charles Gwathmey passed away on Monday, but he was fondly remembered by his many colleagues, including Robert Siegel, Richard Meier, Michael Graves, and Peter Eisenman, in our obituary. We invite readers to share their own memories of this "fighter for modernism" in the comments section below. But please, be erudite, as Gwathmey would have had it no other way.
Placeholder Alt Text

Remembering Julius Shulman

As you may have learned by now, renowned architectural photographer Julius Shulman died Wednesday night at age 98. (You can read our obituary here.) We encourage you to share memories, thoughts, and impressions of one of the most influential figures to ever engage with the built environment. Just leave a comment below. To start things off, we've posted the trailer to the forthcoming documentary about the great photographer, Visual Acoustics, by Eric Bricker. It was moving to watch even before this sad news, but now it really puts into perspective--almost as well as his own photos--the sheer genius that was Julius Shulman. You can watch it after the jump.
Placeholder Alt Text

Ray Kappe Remembers Marvin Rand

We ran a rememberance of Marvin Rand yesterday by Larry Scarpa of Pugh+Scarpa. Here's another from Ray Kappe, the founding director of Sci-Arc:
Marvin Rand was a good friend and an exceptional architectural photographer. I have fond memories of that slight, energetic man with the large camera photographing one of my earliest houses in Sherman Oaks, in 1956. We grew up in Los Angeles architecture together--I developing my practice, and he photographing some of the most important buildings in Los Angeles--from documenting the Watts Towers, Greene and Greene, the architecture of early modernist Irving Gill, the Case Study houses and other works of Craig Ellwood, to many of the young architects of today. Marvin enjoyed working with younger architects, especially in recent years. He switched to digital photography and used the latest techniques. I am sure that is what kept him young at heart. He was also generous with some of us older members of the profession later in life, photographing work that he thought was important, and without charge. He honored me by photographing my 50 Year Retrospective exhibit at the A+D Museum in 2003-2004, and contributed two large major photographs, 5’ x 8’, which hung from the ceiling. Those of us who were fortunate to know and work with Marvin, as well as the architectural profession at large, have lost a generous spirit, and a talented friend and advocate. He will be sorely missed.
Placeholder Alt Text

Remembering Max Bond

As we reported, Max Bond passed away yesterday. We're already getting condolences from far and wide--more on that soon--but we also wanted to open up the blog and encourage readers to submit their own thoughts and memories. Please submit them in the comments section below. UPDATE: Here's a thoughtful note from Michael Arad, who worked with Bond on the World Trade Center Memorial:
The last time I saw Max was shortly before the election - we were both filled with hope and apprehension - and in retrospect, we were both coming at it from very different places but with similar desires. I am glad that he lived to see the election and all that it represented, especially for him, and I am sorry that he won't be with us for the dedication of the Memorial.