Posts tagged with "Oana Stanescu":

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Oana Stănescu, Kiki Van Eijk, and more will design installations for Coachella 2020

Nine artists and architects have been selected to create large-scale art installations for this year's Coachella Arts and Music Festival. This year's selection of creative talent has several veterans of the program, including the U.K.-based art and design studio NEWSUBSTANCE, Los Angeles-based creative team Do LaB, New York-based artist Robert Bose, and Raices Cultura, a 501C(3) nonprofit based in Coachella, California. Each of them presented memorable installations in previous years, such as NEWSUBSTANCE's 2018 Spectra, a multicolored ramp tower that later won AN's 2018 Best of Design Award for Lighting—Outdoor, and a chain of balloons hovering over the festival grounds by Robert Bose.
 
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The majority of those presenting in this year's festival, however, are newcomers that will likely bring fresh ideas to the site. Included on the roster is Oana Stănescu, a New York-based architect and cofounder of Family, whose most notable experience includes stage designs for Kanye West and retail spaces for Virgil Abloh's clothing brand Off-White. Dutch designer Kiki Van Eijk and multidisciplinary artist Cristopher Cichocki will both bring their trademark interests in natural forms to their installations. Buenos Aires-based architecture firm Estudio Normal will likely adapt their materially-sensitive practice to the grounds, while New York- and Rome-based firm Architensions will likely create an experiential space unique to their practice’s research on social behaviors. The art installations have been an integral part of the three-day music event since 2010, when festival owner Goldenvoice Productions decided to commission art after increasing their arts budget. A wide range of artists and architects have been given the opportunity to design installations in previous years, including architects Bureau Spectacular, Francis Kéré, and Office Kovacs, as well as artists including Olalekan Jeyifous, Dedo Vabo, and Sofia Enriquez. “Building on our art program with designers, architects and visual artists from around the world and from the Coachella Valley allows festivalgoers to explore shared global interests and perspectives through the experience of ambitious and one of a kind, large-scale installations”, said Paul Clemente, art director of Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, in a press release. “The artists and designers invited this year are all active and respected voices in their communities at the nexus of today’s cultural conversation. Their works have rigor–challenging urgent issues and ideas while balancing the requirements of scale and function with playfulness and wonder.” All of the installations will be on display and in use during both weekends, from April 10 to 12 and April 17 to 19.
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Food Radio's conversations about succeeding in creative fields are now online

This past fall, Dong-Ping Wong of Food took over a storefront near his firm’s Chinatown office to launch a radical pop-up educational and hangout space he called Office Hours. Along with workshops and other programming, Wong led an audio livestream, Food Radio, where he invited over 50 guests—artists, architects, designers, musicians publishers, and more—for nearly 40 conversations. Now, all the broadcasts have been archived and are ready to be listened to anytime on Food’s website. Office Hours’ mission from the get-go was about inclusion, education, and action across race, class, and age facilitated by an open door policy, workshops throughout the day, and Food designers going out to round up local kids and teens at the library. Hardly recorded in a isolated soundproof room, the Food Radio conversations took place in the back of the pop-up's narrow storefront space, and during the broadcasts you can hear Wong and his guests chatting with people coming in and out who might’ve come to say hi or listen live, or just to see what this new space on the street was all about. By bringing together a broad swath of architects, curators, politicians, and others, Wong wanted to show people, especially younger generations, that making a career out of creative work was possible and to highlight the experiences of creative people who local children might identify with. As New York state assembly member Yuh-Line Niou told Wong, she believes it's necessary to “tell young people not to self-select out,” that just because they haven’t seen people of their background—children of immigrants, people of color, people of various class origins—yet in fields that they might find interesting, or this is “the first time they’re seeing it,” that it remains possible for them to follow these paths, and, perhaps more importantly, make their own. Many of these guests really got their starts by daring to do something that no one else had done, Wong explained. “We've seen a lot of our guests using a lack of familiar model as a springboard to do something totally unique," Wong said. "Sometimes you just have to make stuff when nobody asked you to.” The expansive and radical proposition of Food is to make new possibilities for others. While all of the conversations were original and informative, some standouts include those with architects Toshiko Mori and Tei Carpenter of Agency—Agency, mother and daughter (though with their own, separate firms), for their first family interview; creative director Heron Preston, who has collaborated with Kanye West (Wong has, too) and Virgil Abloh; SO-IL co-founder and principal Jing Liu; Oana Stanescu, who ran Family with Wong; and Christopher Leong and Dominic Leong of Leong Leong. Many of the conversations were both seriously casual and casually serious, much like the whole project. Mori and Carpenter, for example, explored a range of topics: what they did that week; how they each got their start; how to learn from one another as architects across generations; how they’re approaching their careers differently; being Asian women in the field; the responsibility of architects to engage and communicate across disciplinary and political lines; the field’s need for a “diversification of moral practice;" and that perennially impossible problem many of us face: knowing when to say no. Since Office Hours has gone off the street and there’s no chance to drop in any more, these recordings offer an opportunity to connect, listen, and share across disciplines, time, and geography and are an imperative intervention to shift the conversation on architectural practice and, simply, remind everyone to believe in their own power and creative drive.
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Meet the architect behind Kanye West's 50-foot volcano, Los Angeles mansion, and design-savvy baby-proofing

Ironically, there are few surer ways to emerge from obscurity than to be hired by Kanye West. For Romanian architect Oana Stanescu, who designed a 50-foot stage-prop volcano for the rapper’s Yeezus tour, it meant finding a way to reconcile pop culture with utilitarian design. Stanescu and her partner Dong Ping-Wong, of New York–based design firm Family, recently completed the Hong Kong flagship store of Off White, a high-end streetwear brand founded by Virgil Abloh, West’s creative director. In a recent interview with the New York Times, Stanescu declined to reveal what other Yeezus-related projects are forthcoming, but she was reportedly hired to baby-proof and redesign the 9,000 square-foot, faux-French-Italian Los Angeles mansion the rapper shares with wife Kim Kardashian and daughter North West. As one of the designers behind the Kickstarter-backed +Pool project, which seeks to install a floating pool in the East River, Stanescu is persistently, if inadvertently, in the public eye. When queried about her name being dropped by the gossip tabloids after she designed West’s volcano, she pragmatically told the New York Times, “Design is at its best when it’s collaborative. I’m interested in pushing the boundaries of what architecture can do.” West made an appearance at +Pool’s Fall Swim Benefit in at Jane’s Carousel in Dumbo to support Stanescu’s project, set to be the world’s first water-filtering pool when it opens in 2017. The plus-shaped pool can reportedly clean 500,000 gallons or river water per day. Meanwhile, Stanescu has been photographed accompanying West on architectural field trips to seek inspiration for his pared-down Paris home, where she is adding a baby room. But she is not the only top designer West has consorted with—the rapper has also consulted household names Dirand, Vervoordt and Tristan Auer, neglecting an unspoken competitive code of conduct in the design world. “Right now Kanye is just sponging things up, observing how these people work,” Stanescu told W magazine. The architect first met West when he hired Rem Koolhaas’ Office of Metropolitan Architecture, where Stanescu used to work, to design a viewing pavilion for his short film Cruel Summer at the Cannes Film Festival 2012.