Posts tagged with "NYC X Design":

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Seth Rogan and other celebs pair with designers for unique NYCxDesign pieces

Digital magazine Sight Unseen has paired 13 celebrities from film, fashion, and art with 13 interior and furniture designers to create one-of-a-kind objects for this year’s New York Design Week (NYCxDESIGN). Each of the items are available for sale, with the proceeds going to benefit a charity of the pair’s choosing. The collaboration is part of Sight Unseen’s fifth annual OFFSITE fair, which will be spread out across 13 separate venues across downtown Manhattan between May 17 and May 20. The collection, dubbed Field Studies, will anchor the fair’s central hub at 201 Mulberry Street. “The idea was to connect creatives across disciplinary boundaries so they could search for commonalities in their practices and discover what unexpected ideas might result,” said Sight Unseen in a statement. Contemporary design studio Bower and actor Seth Rogan have created a massive mirror inspired by “shared influences  —  midcentury  furniture,  street  art,  and  the  colors  of  1980s  pop  culture.” The six-foot-tall mirror is actually composed of glass strips positioned on top of a gradient painting, lending the illusion of a three-dimensional globe. Artist and designer Christopher Stuart and artist Julia Dault have produced a circular, backlit sconce that seemingly “peels” away from the wall it’s attached to, revealing a soft glow at the corner. Designer Fernando Mastrangelo and actor Boyd Holbrook have created a set of planters carved from massive lumps of coal, in reference to Holbrook’s father, a Kentucky coal miner. Creative consulting and interior design firm Wall for Apricots and actor Jason Schwartzman have designed a postmodern pastel pink-and-gold piano with matching stool. The team wrapped a classic 1970s Hohner Clavinet Pianet keyboard inside of a plywood console table to completely disguise the instrument within. Furniture and lighting designer Kelly Wearstler and fashion blogger Aimee Song have put together a shaggy sitting stool made from dyed goat hair, with brass legs ending in plunger-like red marble feet. Designer Harry Nuriev and artist Liam Gillick have fabricated a series of rectangular floor lamps that integrate stainless steel with the glass panels that Gillick is known for. Furniture studio Ladies & Gentlemen Studio and fashion designers Kaarem have encased custom Kaarem fabric swatches in resin to create a series of vases. Architect Drew Seskunas of The Principals and musician Angel Olsen have built a machine that translates sound waves into wax forms. The resultant shapes were then used to cast unique aluminum candlesticks. Rafael de Cárdenas of Architecture at Large and fashion stylist Mel Ottenberg have translated the ribbed structural details of furniture into three quilts, each made of luxury materials like merino and suede. Designer Oliver Haslegrave of Home Studios and stylist Natasha Royt have reinterpreted the suit stand for the modern age, including stratifying different types of marble into the cubic base. Interior designer Kelly Behun and fashion designer Narciso Rodriguez have put together a sculptural, asymmetric lounge chair that forces its occupant into an unfamiliar situation where they need to rebalance themselves. Glass designer Thaddeus Wolfe and chef Ignacio Mattos have designed a hand-blown glass cake stand that resembles a hunk of ice. The glass is embedded with concave lenses, which appear to minimize whatever’s placed inside the case. Painter Andrew Kuo provided an artwork and furniture maker Tyler Hays of BDDW took the opportunity to turn it into a puzzle. The pieces and lettering within are obscured by Kuo’s design for an added level of difficulty. All 13 pieces are available for sale here.
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Lively seating and signage will brighten up Times Square this summer

New York’s Times Square plaza will be transformed by designers Brad Ascalon, Joe Doucet, Louis Lim, DYAD and Hive Public Space this May. Organized by the Times Square Alliance, the designers’ solutions rethink the street furniture of one of the world’s most visible public spaces. The collection includes conceptual designs for seating, signage, and book display. Furniture designer Brad Ascalon designs an "island" that incorporates planters, seating and storage. Product designer Joe Doucet envisions colorful pods that organize the interactions of people in the public space. Urban design and placemaking consultancy Hive Public Space combines a bookcase with a bench, echoing the Strand Bookstore nearby. DYAD, led by designer Douglas Fanning, formulates an eye-catching sign holder resembling a kick-boxing stand, and Louis Lim designs a teardrop-shaped, touch-responsive signage system. “Times Square asked great New York City designers to build on permanent transformations such as the red steps and the pedestrian plazas, and temporary transformations through design and public art,” said Tim Tompkins, President of the Times Square Alliance, and the organizer of local events. The pieces will be revealed on the plaza together with the opening of the Design Pavilion during NYCxDesign. They are curated by Times Square Design Lab (TSqDL), which is a collaboration between 6¢ Design, a think tank led by Principal Victoria Milne, and the Times Square Alliance. NYCxDesign is an annual event that celebrates local and worldwide design talents and will take place between May 11 and 23 this year.
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NYC Department of Design and Construction Launches Program to Support Local Designers

Last May New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn announced a new initiative, NYC X Design, to promote New York's design community, an economic sector that includes more than 40,000 designers of various disciplines, according to official figures. As an outgrowth of NYC X Design, today the Department of Design and Construction (DDC) launched a new pilot project called Built/NYC, which provides $400,000 in capital funding for custom furniture, lighting, or textile designs in up to 20 city building projects. Council Speaker Quinn's office provided the funding for the project, and at a press conference today held at the NoHo design store, The Future Perfect, Speaker Quinn argued that the initiative would support both local designers and local manufacturers and help maintain a diverse economy. Interested designers can respond to an new RFQ, which would place them on a pre-qualified list to be considered for custom pieces for projects like new libraries, community centers, or fire houses (architects for the building projects sit on the selection committee).  According to Victoria Milne, Director of creative services for DDC, designers will retain copyright to the designs, allowing them to potentially sell their objects to other municipalities or to bring them to market through a manufacturer. Industrial and interior designer Harry Allen praised the program for giving opportunities to local designers. He said that New York is "an amazing creative city, but also a hard city." Built/NYC will serve as a new way for industrial, lighting, and textile designers to break into public work. Quinn demonstrated her love of design by complimenting Allen on his slip-on Converse Jack Purcell shoes and she gushed about the wares on display at the The Future Perfect. She warned the assembled reporters to be careful in the store. "If you break it, you buy it," she joked.