Posts tagged with "NoLita":

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First look inside the Lenny Kravtiz–designed interiors at 75 Kenmare

To much aplomb on Friday, 75 Kenmare (located at Kenmare and Mulberry Streets in Nolita) launched sales on its luxury condos. The building, designed by New York City–based Andre Kikoski Architects, features grooved sandblasted precast concrete panels that reference its neighbors, such as Tadao Ando’s 152 Elizabeth Street. Inside, the seven-story 38-unit building has appropriately glam touches with plenty of creamy marble, a sparkling lobby wall, and touches of gold finishes. “It’s really about trying to capture some of that original downtown feel that I experienced in the ’80s,” Lenny Kravitz told The New York Times. “I remember when it was all my friends squatting in lofts that now cost $10 million. People were just painting and sculpting.” However, the apartments, which start at $1.69 million for a 601-square-foot one-bedroom, are a far cry from gritty. Click through the slideshow to take a look!
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Archtober Building of the Day 29> The Musket Room by Shadow Architects

The Musket Room 265 Elizabeth Street, Manhattan Shadow Architects If we visit Michelin star restaurants next Archtober, we’ve got to make a deal for the meal. The meal’s the thing here. The Musket Room moved into Manhattan's old Rialto space, a long-gone hangout for architects working in the nearby Puck Building. It's got a gun over the bar. Larry Cohn of architect-of-record Shadow Architects, prepared the filing documents that wended their way through the post-Sandy building department. The warm woods and teal leather banquettes specified by London-based Alexander Waterworth Interiors, have replaced the bright red plastic ones that lined the brick side walls of the not-forgotten Rialto. A nice chap, Larry, took us through the restaurant, and showed us the spanking clean basement kitchen with its array of chemical lab experiments called food. Frank Hanes, the sous chef, explained the polyethylene-encased meats that were being cooked sous-vide: venison leg fillets, a specialty of the house on the menu as “New Zealand red deer/flavors of gin,” which includes licorice and fennel – and maybe a juniper berry or two. You can tell I’m not a foodie. It was nice to see nasturtiums growing in the raised beds in the back that serve as an herb garden for the chef, New Zealander Mack Lambert, who conjures a nasturtium vinaigrette that might appear somewhere in the early courses of our future meal. We could top it off with Pig’s blood/berries/rhubarb/herbs for dessert. Cynthia Phifer Kracauer is the Managing Director of the Center for Architecture and the festival director for Archtober: Architecture and Design Month NYC. She was previously a partner at Butler Rogers Baskett, and from 1989-2005 at Swanke Hayden Connell. After graduating from Princeton (AB 1975, M.Arch 1979) she worked for Philip Johnson, held faculty appointments at the University of Virginia, NJIT, and her alma mater.
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Marvel at the time-lapse renderings of Nolita’s 34 Prince Street

Those feeling nostalgic for the New York of yesterday can feast on time lapse renderings by Brooklyn-based MARCH for Marvel Architects' 34 Prince Street. The New York firm is converting the former convent, orphanage, and school into luxury residences. Newly released renderings depict the 1825 Federal-style building as it was in 1900, 1940, 1980, and 2016 (the project's expected completion date). The structure, part of the Old St. Patrick's Cathedral's holdings, will be converted into eight condos and a townhouse, with a starting price of $7.74 million. A second, glass brick townhouse will be constructed on the site, as well. The church will move to a 6,100 square foot ground floor space. They may not contain fireworks or butterflies, but the historically accurate details (check out the telegraph wires, above) and the range of color tones make it look like they were shot on film.
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“UUGGHH”: Mysterious, graffiti-covered New York City landmark likely to go condo

A developer has finally gotten his hands on one of Manhattan’s most intriguing and desired properties: 190 Bowery. The six-story Renaissance Revival building opened in 1898 as a branch of the Germania Bank, but had been the private home and workspace of photographer Jay Maisel since 1966. Back then, he bought the building for $102,000 and held onto it for decades as property values skyrocketed in Nolita. For that reason, 190 Bowery has become a beloved, graffiti-covered piece of New York nostalgia, defying gentrification as everything else around it adapted with the times. But that's about to change. In September, the New York Times reported that prolific art collector and developer Aby Rosen had picked up the landmarked property as part of his firm's recent “Manhattan buying spree.” The purchase price for 190 Bowery was not revealed, but in 2008 it was believed to be valued somewhere around $50 million. Rosen told the Times that it took him six months to finally convince Maisel to hand over the property, which apparently doesn't have heat. According to New York Magazine, which visited 190 Bowery back in 2008, the home "feels like a dream world, or a benign version of the vast hotel in The Shining." If Maisel played the long-game on 190 Bowery, then Rosen did just the opposite. The Commercial Observer reported that Rosen's company, RFR Holdings, is already trying to flip the property. Whatever happens next at 190 Bowery, it will likely include expensive condos, dooming the building's graffiti to be power-sprayed into oblivion. Bowery Boogie spotted a rendering (below) of just that on the website of real estate company's Massey Knakal. But before 190 Bowery gets its deep clean, artist Eric Rieger, known as HOTTEA, decided to add one more creative mark to the building's facade. As Gothamist reported, he recently slotted wood letters into the building that literally spells out exactly how he feels about the sale: "UUGGHH."
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Ta-da!: Ando Tipped for New York Condos

Tadao Ando appears set to realize his first ground-up residential project in New York City. Andrew Luck's favorite will be designing eight condominiums in a building to be located on a Nolita corner currently occupied by a parking garage. Developers Saif Sumaida and Amit Khurana drummed up $21 million to purchase the site and thus pave the way for what is projected to be a 32,000-square-foot structure. The  Pritzker Prize winner has previously offered smaller contributions to the city. Ando made his New York debut inside Japanese restaurant Morimoto and also designed the penthouse and lobby of a Soho apartment buildingGabellini Sheppard will take care of the interior of the new space, which is said to be opening in 2016. [Via Curbed.]