Posts tagged with "New York City":

Placeholder Alt Text

VIDEO> Repairing and Replacing Two New York City Region Bridges

Bridges. They can be grand and majestic, awe-inspiring symbols of engineering ingenuity, city-defining pieces of infrastructure, and, as you may have heard by now, at serious risk of collapsing. To stop that from happening, engineers basically have two options: repair or replace. Both of those strategies are currently pursued in the New York City region. As the New York Times explains in a new video, the Tappan Zee Bridge was in such bad shape that it made more sense to just build a new bridge right next to it at the cost $3.9 billion. When complete, the new structure will have express bus lanes, and a bike and pedestrian pathway. Now, obviously, the Brooklyn Bridge isn't going anywhere, but the aging icon does need to have some work done. Instead of replacing the structure, the bridge has remained open while construction crews have been reconstructing its ramps and approaches, replacing 600 bridge bearings, and removing lead paint.
Placeholder Alt Text

Eavesdrop> Trade Shows A-Go Go

The world of design trade shows seems to be ever expanding, with established and new shows sending out satellites coast-to-coast. A mini version of Dwell on Design is coming to New York, opening on October 9. Meanwhile, New York’s biggest design show, ICFF, is heading west, during the Kitchen and Bath Industry Show in Las Vegas. And New York Design Week is expanding still further with yet another show, tentatively titled Disruptive Design. We can already feel the hangover coming on!
Placeholder Alt Text

Manhattan's Rizzoli Bookstore to Reopen in the Flatiron District

New York’s iconic Rizzoli Bookstore has found a new home. After its former location on 57th Street was demolished to make way for the thoroughfare’s latest super-tall luxury building, it seemed that it was end days for the beloved institution. At the time, Rizzoli’s owners said the store would open up shop elsewhere in the city, but given the current state of affairs for old-school bookstores, that seemed highly unlikely. Now, just a few months later, it appears that Rizzoli executives have actually delivered on their promise. Representatives from the Italian company recently told the Wall Street Journal that they have signed a lease for a ground floor space in a Beaux-Arts building in the Flatiron District. The 5,000-square-foot space, roughly the same size as Rizzoli’s previous location, offers 18-foot ceilings and is set to welcome readers this spring. Rizzoli executives reportedly scoped out 150 locations in the city before settling on the space at 1133 Broadway. Rizzoli’s first shop opened in New York City in 1964, but the bookseller had been operating out of its 57th Street location since 1985. When news broke that the space was threatened by future development, preservationists launched a campaign to get landmark status for the 109-year-old building that housed the store. That effort was ultimately unsuccessful and construction crews got to work dismantling the structure, and its ornate, vaulted ceilings, this summer.
Placeholder Alt Text

Bright public art installation to light up New York City's cold, dark winter

The summer is officially over, folks. The beaches are closed, the sun is switching to its seasonal, part-time schedule, and your coworkers are drinking Pumpkin Spice Lattes again. There is no ignoring an inevitable truth: winter is coming and there is nothing you can do about it. Well, if you live up north that is. You could move to Florida, but beyond that, there is nothing you can do about it. For those of us stuck in New York City this holiday season, it's not all bad news. We will soon be able to feast our frostbitten eyes on a new public art installation in front of the Flatiron Building. Today, the Flatiron Partnership and Van Alen Institute announced that New York Light, an installation by architect and designer INABA, has won their first-ever Flatiron Plaza Holiday Design Competition. INABA’s angled structure, which is made of mirrored panels and steel tubes, will frame the Flatiron Building on the south and open up to the Empire State Building to the north. At night, New York Light, it will be illuminated by LEDs. “The Flatiron Plaza is one of the few places where it’s possible to truly experience the magnificence of Manhattan’s urban plan. And it’s a unique spot in the heart of the city where the sky and skyline can be seen from street level,” said Jeffrey Inaba, the founder of INABA, in a statement. “The installation is meant to be a place to take in these qualities, as well as to appreciate all of the street activity day and night through its many reflective panels.” New York Light will open before Thanksgiving and run for one month. Tillotson Design Associates, Ben Gal Fierro, and Buro Happold collaborated with INABA on the project.
Placeholder Alt Text

From 67 floors above the World Trade Center, a progress report

Earlier this week, AN went up to the 67th floor of the recently-opened 4 World Trade Center to get a progress report on the 16-acre redevelopment taking shape below. Inside the wide-open and raw space, Larry Silverstein, the site’s developer, told reporters that his vision for a new World Trade Center had finally become a reality. “I’ve gotten a bit of a reputation as a wild-eyed optimist,” he said in front of a wall of windows. “But even I have to admit that I didn’t see all this coming.” Noting that it had been 13 years since the attacks, he went on to refer to the anniversary as the site’s “bar mitzvah.” From high up in Fumihiko Maki’s celebrated 4 World Trade it’s easy to see how much has changed at the World Trade Center site over those 13 years—and how much still needs to get done. Looking straight down the tower’s western edge, you can see the pools of the 9/11 Memorial Plaza which opened in 2011 and the adjacent 9/11 Memorial Museum that came on-line three years later. Next to that is Calatrava’s bird-like transportation hub where workers could be seen busily welding on the structure's skeletal wings. That project is scheduled to open in the second half of 2015, years behind schedule and at a cost of nearly $4 billion. A few blocks north of the winged creature is 7 World Trade, the David Childs–designed building that opened in 2006 and is fully leased. Across Vesey Street is another Child's tower—the site’s centerpiece—the 1,776-foot-tall One World Trade. After years of delays, the building is expected to open some time this fall. As of now, the tower is about 60 percent leased. The same can be said for 4 World Trade. "I am both humbled and inspired by the process. It is never an easy process, and why should it be?" asked Daniel Libeskind, who crafted the site's masterplan. "This is New York City, there are so many stakeholders, so much to be done, and so much to think about." But there is obviously so much more to be done still—so many missing pieces in Libeskind's plan. Just this month, the board of the World Trade Center's performing arts center announced it had scrapped Gehry's decade-old design for the project. The board told the New York Times that is currently looking for a new architect to take over. And then there is Calatrava's other project at the site, the new St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, which is still a few years off. While looking straight down from 4 World Trade shows how much has been rebuilt since 9/11, looking straight out reveals how much has not. The Midtown skyline that served as a backdrop for the event's speakers may have been impressive, but it was a blatant reminder of what has not been accomplished since the Twin Towers came crashing down. Because, at this point in the reconstruction process, employees in 4 World Trade Center shouldn’t have an entirely unobstructed view of Midtown—there should be two other glass towers in the way: 3 World Trade by Richard Rogers and 2 World Trade by Norman Foster. Silverstein said that the former should be completed by 2018, but as for 2 World Trade Center, it’s anyone’s guess. In a fact sheet distributed by representatives of Silverstein Properties, the tower's completion date is conspicuously left off.
Placeholder Alt Text

Tuesday> Reception at the Bronx Museum's "Beyond the Supersquare" exhibition

Beyond the Supersquare: Art and Architecture in Latin America After Modernism at the Bronx Museum is the most exciting and challenging architecture and urbanism exhibit in New York at the moment. The focus of the exhibit is the influence modern architecture and architectural thought has had on contemporary art in the Caribbean and Latin America. But while it features the work of artists and not primarily architects, all the works selected by Bronx Museum Executive Director Holly Block and Independent Curator María Inés Rodriguez were chosen for their insights into architecture and the immediate challenges of the region's exploding urbanism. supersquare2 In addition the museum has commissioned artist Terence Gower to create SuperPuesto, a colorful outdoor temporary pavilion that creates a modernist space in which visitors can immerse themselves in the themes highlighted in the show. The Architect's Newspaper, along with New York architects Carlos Brillembourg and Belmont Freeman, both of whom have personal and professional roots in the region, will host a reception at the museum this Tuesday, September 16 from 6–8:00p.m. We will also walk across the Grand Concourse and visit Superpuesta and meet the artist, Terence Gower. View more images from the exhibition in AN's recent Portfolio piece here.
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Times Square 1984: The Postmodern Moment

Times Square 1984: The Postmodern Moment The Skyscraper Museum 39 Battery Place, New York Through January 18, 2015 Times Square is one of the most renowned cultural hubs in the entire world. It is commonly heralded as the perfect tourist attraction: full of bright lights at night, giant LED billboard signs, and men in furry costumes of Elmo and the Cookie Monster. Times Square 1984: The Postmodern Moment, currently on view at The Skyscraper Museum, enlightens visitors with the recent history of Times Square and how it became what it is today. The exhibition is composed of a mix of photographs, blueprints, and films that depict the gradual evolution of the area. The exhibition is key to understanding how the area went from seedy to family friendly, and came to attract media and finance alongside its longstanding theater tenants.
Placeholder Alt Text

Herringbone Whisky Bar by Taylor and Miller

Owner-built interior explores the transition from two dimensions to three.

For his latest venture, The Montrose in Park Slope, Brooklyn, whisky bar proprietor and former contractor Steve Owen (with partners Michael Ferrie and Alex Wade) wanted a rough, industrial look evocative of an Old World distillery. "He was coming at it sort of from an antique perspective, as a pastiche," said B. Alex Miller, partner at Taylor and Miller Architecture and Design. "We were thinking of it in a different way." Taylor and Miller, who had worked with Owen on several projects when he was a practicing contractor, noticed the prevalence of wood herringbone patterning on the walls and floors of the spaces Owen was inspired by. "We'd done some other herringbone studies," said Miller. "We said, 'This is something that's often done in a high-end scenario. Let's pare it down to the barest of essentials, just do it out of 2-by-4 pine, do it in grain on the walls.'" The design of The Montrose became, said Miller, "a very basic exercise in transitioning from a two-dimensional to a three-dimension pattern," in which individual boards were pulled away from the wall in the z direction. Working in Rhino, the architects explored multiple iterations of the form, including the different textures created when a unit was defined as a single stick versus a two-board L. The ceiling, along which boards are arrayed lengthwise, also received a three-dimensional treatment. "There were some really interesting relationships in the ceiling," observed Miller, "almost like a musical score."
  • Fabricator Steve Owen
  • Designers Taylor and Miller Architecture and Design
  • Location Brooklyn
  • Date of Completion 2013
  • Material pine boards, nails, screws
  • Process Rhino, hanging, hammering, drilling
Though the herringbone patterning was developed almost entirely on the computer, Taylor and Miller wanted to avoid the sense of an overly precise, machine-made space—hence the use of standard lumber. "We're often looking at very basic materials, at how to do it in a repetitive way so that the human intervention is felt," said Miller. "We wanted to make it a little more than a highly fabricated, laser-cut, pristine sort of thing." Owen built The Montrose's interior himself. "Because he was a friend, and a contractor, we could remove a lot of the documentation that would normally be required," said Miller. In fact, Owen soon abandoned the digital models Taylor and Miller passed along. "Once he figured out the system, we were able to give him just data points, just coordinates," said Miller. "It was a feedback loop: he was interpreting what we gave him. He said, 'Okay, just give me the z data off the wall.' We joked that he was seeing the Matrix a little bit." The installation itself was "dumb, in a good way," said Miller, requiring nothing more than nails and the occasional screw. "When we're doing something like this that we know is hyper-labor-intensive, it can't be complicated from an install point of view. There's nothing overly polished; it's just dirty." That messiness is exactly what Miller most appreciates about the finished product. "When we go in there now, some of the curves are a little bit rough," he said. "You can see these—they're mistakes, frankly, but I love the space because of it. This is not a highly precious thing, this is not a highly sculptured piece. It's someone interpreting our concept."
Placeholder Alt Text

Eavesdrop> Muckraking Architecture Critics!

Zaha Hadid has sued the New York Review of Books. The complaint, filed last month in Manhattan Supreme Court, takes issue with a piece by architecture critic Martin Filler that allegedly mischaracterized her comments on the deaths of hundreds of migrant construction workers in Qatar, where she has designed a soccer stadium for the 2022 World Cup. According to Hadid’s lawyers, the article is a “personal attack disguised as a book review” of New York Observer architecture critic Rowan Moore’s Why We Build. It apparently quotes the Pritzker Prize winner as saying that architects “have nothing to do with the workers” and goes on to characterize her as being a generally uncaring and difficult person. The lawyers went on to point out that no workers have died on Hadid’s project, which, as a matter of fact, has yet to begin construction. The suit has stirred up quite a bit of activity on social media, including a tweet from Paul Goldberger, who said that the suit was unwise as it will earn Hadid a reputation as “the architect who sues critics.” The NYRB has since issued a retraction.
Placeholder Alt Text

Letter to the Editor> Sitting on the Dock

[ Editor's Note: The following letter was left in the comments section of archpaper.com in response to Alan G. Brake’s editorial “The Seaport Adrift” (AN 09_07.23.2014), which argued for more programming at Manhattan’s South Street Seaport, such as housing. Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com] How would adding housing help connect the building to its surroundings? The seaport is inherently a destination for most of the people who use it. The pop-up food market was perhaps the best-suited program for the site. New York needs places where we feel we can escape the jungle and design doesn’t necessarily help. Why would I need a modern esplanade or a tower on the waterfront? All people really want to do is sit by the dock, look at the boats, and eat something of questionable nutritional value. Andrew Wild Card CUNY Macaulay Honors College
Placeholder Alt Text

Grimshaw's transit-oriented public plaza breaks ground in the Bronx

The New York City Department of Transportation recently broke ground on the second phase of Fordham Plaza's reconstruction in the Bronx. The revamped space will have all the standard-issue pieces of a New York City pedestrian plaza—the planters, benches, seating, trees, lights, and kiosks—but, ultimately, the plaza represents a significant investment in existing transportation infrastructure. Along with the new seating and the new café, the renovation of Fordham Plaza also includes a new canopy and ticketing machines for the adjacent Metro North station, as well as a new bus loop, seating, and shelters for commuters. The project also incorporates elements of Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero agenda through shortened pedestrian crossings, new direct crossings, and an overall increase of pedestrian space by 25 percent. “This project will significantly improve transit riders’ access to the area’s 12 bus lines and rail transportation while also taking advantage of the more than 80,000 pedestrians and potential customers that walk through the area daily,” Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. said in a statement. Streetsblog reported that WXY completed a conceptual design for the plaza in 2010, but documents from the Department of Design and Construction show that Grimshaw, with Mathews Nielsen, is behind the updated site plan. The $10 million project is funded through a TIGER Grant from the federal Department of Transportation and is expected to open next fall. According to the NYC DOT, there are currently 46 pedestrian plazas in the city with 18 more in the works. Four of those already-open plazas are in the Bronx and there are three more on the way.
Placeholder Alt Text

Reminder: Registration ends soon for the vision42design competition

The vision42design competition to rethink and redesign the entire length of New York City's 42nd Street was launched last April by AN and The Institute for Rational Urban Mobility. Entrants in the competition have the opportunity to not only rethink this important street but transform Manhattan at its core and become a model for major urban thoroughfares worldwide. The competition has generated wide interest from architects, urban designers, transportation planners, landscape architects, and other professionals and academic design studios from around the world. The date for submission of digital design materials for the competition is midnight EST on October 1, 2014, but the digital registration deadline is September 8 at midnight. In order to register, go to the competition website and then click "Registration." We will announce a short list of phase one winners on October 6, 2014.