Posts tagged with "New York City":

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Plus Pool Needs Money For Mock-Up

For nearly a decade now, New Yorkers have been turning their focus on revitalizing the city's waterfront, a trend that has only grown in the wake of Hurricane SandyWXY Architecture’s East River Blueway and Bloomberg’s Vision 2020 are two examples of initiatives that seek to build sustainable, accessible, and engaging shorelines for the city. But with summer approaching and the days heating up, what city dwellers may want most from their estuaries is a cool, clean dip. Brooklyn-based design firms Family Architects and PlayLab hope to make that dream possible, but they still need $250,000 to get started. In two weeks, the group will launch a campaign to create a smaller mock-up of +Pool, the floating, plus sign–shaped pool that could land in the East River by May 2015. The mock-up will test the pool's innovative filtration system that cleans water directly from the river to make it safe enough to swim in. The system would use a three-level filtration system within the pool's walls, which filters the river water, making for a pleasant and healthy immersion. The design of the 9,000-square-foot facility combines an Olympic-length lap pool, kids pool, sports pool, and lounge pool, opening the water park up to all levels of swimmers. +Pool previously raised over $40,000 on Kickstarter and has attracted support from engineering firm Arup, local politicians, and the architectural community. Stay tuned for your chance to dip into your wallet for a dip in the pool!
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South Street Seaport Plans Summer Experiment in Temporary Urbanism

The South Street Seaport's Pier 17 won't be around much longer in its current form as it awaits a $200 million overhaul by SHoP Architects, but this summer, the neighborhood surrounding it has some exciting plans in store that bring the hottest trends in temporary urbanism to the waterfront site. Starting on Memorial Day Weekend, the See/Change program will bring film screenings, a SmorgasBar, and pop-up shipping container boutiques in hopes of enticing New Yorkers back to this once-trendy Lower Manhattan neighborhood. The centerpiece will be a stage at Fulton and Water streets. A blanket of grass will cover the cobblestone street and wood-and-canvas beach chairs will be positioned to create an improvised theater for weekly concerts and film series called Front Row Cinema. South of the stage, restored shipping containers will be configured as an asymmetrical, two-story structure for small retail shops. The second level will host SmorgasBar, a subsidiary of the well-known SmorgasBurg, which will turn east on Front Street to Beekman Street where Brooklyn-based food vendors will lure visitors with maple bacon sticks and oysters, among other treats. Plans are also in the works for Cannon’s Walk at 207A Front Street. The calm courtyard, which has been a place to relax and evade tourist hustle and bustle, has been handed over to Brightest Young Things, an experiential marketing agency. The New York Times reports Svetlana Legetic of the company says the space will be converted into a “surprise jewel box space where anything could happen.” Moreover, plans have changed for Pier 17. Previously scheduled to close for renovations, the mall will remain open to assist merchants who lost the holiday season to Hurricane Sandy damage. The seaport has long represented a hub of chain stores, but most ground floor shops remain shuttered to conceal overhauls still taking place. See/Change is an opportunity to bring new life and commerce to the neighborhood.
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Reclaim NYC x2 at NY Design Week

Reclaim NYC, the grassroots organization established for post-Hurricane Sandy relief in the design community, will hold its second furniture exhibition and charity sale during New York Design Week from May 16 to 18 at 446 Broadway, a 5,000-square-foot gallery in the heart of Soho. All event proceeds will go to local communities affected by Hurricane Sandy via the Brooklyn Recovery Fund, a sub sect of the Brooklyn Community Foundation. Founded in 2012 by Jennifer Krichels and Jean Lin, both design writers, editors, and enthusiasts, Krichels recalled her “ah-ha” moment in the aftermath of the storm recently for AN. “While running in Prospect Park I noticed all the [fallen] trees being chopped up, and had an idea to reuse some of the wood—there was so much!” Collaborating on the details with Lin, the duo said participation from the design community quickly gained momentum and the first Reclaim NYC event was orchestrated in approximately one month. The December 2012 show featured more than 30 designers’ work with reclaimed lumber and various interpretations of reused storm debris. “It turned into a way to represent something positive and return the proceeds raised [to those in need], some of whom were designers.” Six months later, many parts of New York have rebounded from the storm’s damage—but not all of them. Many parts of southern Brooklyn and the Rockaways have yet to begin rebuilding after the storm and are still in need of substantial aid. There have been accounts that FEMA will need to spend at least five years in New York to oversee a full recovery, similar to efforts in New Orleans necessitated by Hurricane Katrina. “It’s no longer a hot topic but [aid] is still really important,” Lin said. “People are still affected by it everyday.” For the second iteration of Reclaim NYC, Krichels and Lin called upon designers to create pieces inspired by the idea of collaboration. A roster of 25 teams was organized to arrange established designers with emerging voices, or group designers from varying backgrounds for an opportunity to share their areas of expertise in a new way.  One team that will show at Reclaim NYC is comprised of furniture designers, a biophysicist, and musicians. Together, they designed a wooden table treated with a wood-eating enzyme that etched a pattern into the table’s surface, guided by sound vibrations. “This collaboration encapsulates exactly what we hoped would happen at the show: To bring out real design,” Lin said. With two exhibitions under their belts, Krichels and Lin hope Reclaim NYC is able to move beyond the realm of charity and evolve with the community’s needs to integrate design, education, and mentorship for younger designers, as well as foster opportunities for the design community as a whole. “[We hope] to build something not based in commerce but in collective opportunities to show what the design community can do when it works together.” “Making Reclaim NYC into a charitable outlet and a charitable incubator has come out of conversations with friends and designers, to fit a sustainable model,” Lin added. “As editors and design lovers, we cherish what they’re bringing to the table.” Reclaim NYC will open on May 16 at 12:00 pm and run through May 18, closing at 1:00 pm. A presale of featured items will launch on Monday, May 13 on shop.lin-morris.com, and at60inches.com, an event supporter. A complete list of featured design teams is as follows: Lindsey Adelman x Nancy Callan Brad Ascalon x Naula Workshop Kevin Michael Burns x Adam Pellecchia Colleen and Eric x Leo Hubbard x Benjamin Cameron Dana D'Amico x KWH Joe Doucet e13 x Sciencewerk x Zach Klein x Ike Edeani Egg Collective x Hangar Design Studios Allison Goding x Jerry Nance Grain x Emilie Baltz Stéphane Hubert Design x Sean Brewer Asher Israelow x Wyn Bauer Ladies & Gentlemen Studio x Nicholas Nyland smck studio x d’emploi Daniel Moyer x FilzFelt x submaterial Brendan Mullins x Kreh Mellick Marius Myking x Vidar Koksvik RUX x Stickbulb x David G. Flatt Ltd. Scout Regalia x Reunion Sit and Read x Noah Lambert Souda x Sure We Can Jonah Takagi x Mark Supik & Co. Token x Uhuru UM Project x Baggu VOLK x Dressed in Yellow To learn more about Reclaim NYC, visit reclaimnyc.org, or follow their Facebook page for the latest news.
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It’s Official: Citi Bike To Open in New York City on May 27

The big biking news this week is that the first phase of New York City's Citi Bike bike share system will finally launch on May 27th to program members (and to everyone else the next week), and New Yorkers' enthusiasm (and a little controversy) is mounting. Some New Yorkers, over 8,000 according to Transportation Commissioner Sadik-Kahn (with more than 4,000 of them in the first 24 hours), could not wait to start pedaling and have already signed up for annual memberships. Meanwhile, malcontents from across the City have spoken up in attempts to stop Citi Bike from rolling onto their blocks. Following initial delays from a malfunctioning electronic system, last fall's Hurricane Sandy caused damage to some of the docking stations stored at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, forcing the DOT to delay and downsize the first phase of the program from 420 stations to 330 around Brooklyn and Manhattan. Once the second and third phases are rolled out, however, there will be a total of 600 stations and 10,000 bikes available throughout New York City, rounding out what will be North America’s largest bike share system. Not only will the system provide healthy transportation alternatives for thousands of New Yorkers, but it will also create 170 jobs and generate $36 million in economic activity annually, the NYC DOT claimed in a press release. Despite general enthusiam for the program, a few disgruntled citizens have been stirring up controversy throughout City. One outspoken Fort Greene resident recently pasted fliers on newly installed docking stations, claiming that Citi Bank advertising and commercial activity have no place landmarked residential blocks. In nearby Brooklyn Heights, the co-op at 150 Joralemon Street is bringing a lawsuit to the DOT for blocking their garbage collection. Meanwhile in TriBeCa, the New York Post reported that a lone restaurateur held a street-side sit-in to protest the installation of a bike station in front of his French Bistro. In the West Village, a co-op on Bank Street filed suit against the City after a station was installed directly in front of its entrance, citing it as a threat to public safety. While the suit was dropped, part of the bike rack was removed and replaced by a mysterious, massive stone bollard, WNYC reported. City Comptroller John Liu has also raised safety concerns, arguing for mandatory helmet laws in a press release. Liu also raised the issue that the bike share program could result in an increase of legal claims against the City, but overall, his message was positive. Bike advocates have been shooting down criticism of the program through social media, and the Brooklyn Spoke blog launched the tongue-in-cheek Bike Share Criticism Challenge taking aim at the most common criticisms. During the first week of operation, only those with a 95$ annual membership will be able to ride, but by June 2 daily and weekly passes will also be available. Check the station map to find the bike share station nearest you, and the price guide to see you’re your ride is going to cost you.
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Fifteen-Year MSG Permit Extension Recommended

(Wally Gobetz / Flickr) At a New York City Planning Commission review session this week, the staff at New York City Department of City Planning recommended a 15-year limit on the permit extension for Madison Square Garden (MSG), which would be an “aggressive but realistic” time frame to reach an agreement on the future of the arena. This gives MSG a few more years to come up with a plan for relocation or extensive improvements than the proposed 10-year renewal recommended by Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer. Look for an extended story on the fate of Madison Square Garden in the next print issue of AN. (Photo: Wally Gobetz / Flickr)
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On View> Tracey Emin’s Roman Standard Alights in Petrosino Square

What: Tracey Emin’s Roman Standard Where: Petrosino Square (Spring and Lafayette Streets, NYC) When: May 10 to September 8, 2013 This summer, Nolita’s Petrosino Square in New York will feature Roman Standard, a thirteen-foot-tall pole with a solitary bronze bird perched at the top. From the ground, the towering sculpture by Tracey Emin, sponsored by Art Production Fund, White Cube, and Lehmann Maupin in collaboration with NYC Parks & Recreation, is so lifelike that onlookers may mistake it for a real bird. According to the artist, the figure is a sign of “hope, faith, and spirituality” that should serve as a source of reflection. The showcase will be on view from May 10 to September 8, 2013. Emin pulls inspiration from the militaristic representations of traditional Roman Standards and desires to demonstrate the power that an outwardly unimportant creature can personify through stature and space. In an attempt to design a public display full of magic and mystery instead of oppression and supremacy, the artist suggests that successful works of this variety can be inspiring without being monumental. Roman Standard is Emin’s first public art project and was commissioned by BBC in 2005 as a part of the art05 festival. Following a lucrative Times Square appearance in February, the Petrosino Square exhibit marks her second public project in the New York City. She is a renowned contemporary artist and is globally recognized for her brutally honest approach to art. In concurrence with Roman Standard, Lehmann Maupin will host the two-part installation, Tracey Emin: I Followed You To The Sun. Highlighting more than 100 original works, the exhibition will be on view through June 22, 2013 at both of its New York galleries. The show will expose Emin’s most personal tales.
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NYC Department of Design and Construction Announces New Roster for City Projects

All too often public buildings can fall short on creativity, but with the launch of the Design + Construction Excellence Program in 2004, the Bloomberg administration has raised the ante and tapped a number of top architecture firms from around the world to work on a slew of new city projects. The New York City Department of Design and Construction (DDC) announced today that they have selected 26 emerging and leading architecture firms out of pool of 264 applicants to participate in the next wave of the program, including the likes of BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group,  nArchitects, and TEN Arquitectos. “Working in partnership with these talented architects and DDC’s client agencies, we will continue to build New York’s libraries, firehouses, police precincts, EMS stations, cultural institutions, and other projects with creativity, beauty, and an emphasis on community improvement,” said Commissioner David J. Burney in a statement. From this group of firms, six will be considered for projects costing more than $15 million, and twenty will be assigned to projects of less than $15 million. The DDC selected the following twenty firms for the under $15 million group: Abruzzo Bodziak Architects, Bade Stageberg Cox Architecture, Belmont Freeman Architects, Biber Architects, Cooper Joseph Studio, FR-EE Fernando Romero Enterpris, Gray Organschi Architecture, Hanrahan Meyers Architects, Leroy Street Studio, Levenbetts, Matthew Baird Architects, Monica Ponce de Leon Design and Architecture, Moorehead & Moorehead, nArchitects, Rice + Lipka Architects, Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects, Spacesmith, Studio SUMO, WXY, and Yoshihara McKee Architects. The six firms that will focus on projects of more than $15 million include: Allied Works Architecture, BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group, Ennead, Steven Holl Architects, Studio Gang Architects, and TEN Arquitectos.
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American Academy of Arts & Letters Announces 2013 Architecture Award Winners

arts_and_letters_01 The American Academy of Arts and Letters has announced its 2013 architecture awards recipients. The winners were chosen from a group of 32 individuals and practices nominated by Academy members. An exhibition of their work will be on display at the Audubon Terrace in New York City from May 16 to June 9, 2013. The Academy’s architecture awards program was established in conjunction with the 1955 inauguration of the annual Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize in Architecture, which is presented to a leading architect from any country who has made a noteworthy contribution to architecture as an art. Alberto Campo Baeza from Madrid, Spain won the $5000 prize this year. He has practiced and taught architecture for over 35 years at prominent universities in the U.S. and abroad. He turns architecture into art through utilizing timeless forms. Campo Baeza received the 2013 Heinrich Tessenow Gold Metal. Two Arts and Letters Awards of $7500 recognizing American architects whose work holds a strong personal bearing were presented to Teddy Cruz of San Diego, California and Thomas Phifer of New York. Teddy Cruz is an architect, academic, and activist who investigates the politics and economics that compel urban conflict. Thomas Phifer, who has led his own New York City practice since 1996, blends the beauty and simplicity of Modernism with awareness of the natural environment. Barry Bergdoll and Sanford Kwinter of New York each won an Arts and Letters Award of $7500 given to Americans exploring ideas in architecture using any method of expression. Barry Bergdoll, a 19th- and 20th-century architectural history scholar, is the Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art. Sanford Kwinter is a witer, editor, and Professor of Architectural Theory and Criticism at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, where he co-directs the Master in Design Studies program.
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Doug Aitken celebrates the destruction of New York’s Gallery 303

What do you do if a building is slated for demolition? If you’re the artist Doug Aitken and the building is your gallery, you devise a “time-based destruction installation.” Which is precisely what Aitken, who is known for wrapping the facade of the Hirschhorn Museum in with a 360-degree video installation to the tune of “I Only Have Eyes For You,” installing a video "land art" installation on the Seattle Art Museum, and the video “Sleepwalkers” projected on the facades of MoMA, “a cinematic art experience that directly integrates with the architectural fabric of the city while simultaneously enhancing and challenging viewers’ perceptions of public space” did. Aitken’s latest exhibition, which wrapped up at the end of March, entitled 100 YRS at Gallery 303 on West 21st Street was filled with word-based artworks such Plexiglas letters spelling “Art” with chocolate milk-like slurry cascading over the letters, black textured rock spelling “Sunset” and “Magic” featuring rear-lit images of the blowing up of Pruitt-Igo on each letter. Visitors were greeted by “Sonic Fountain” which is a round hole jackhammered out of the galley floor (since it was going to be destroyed anyway), filled with water from dripping pipes on the ceiling, and equipped with underwater microphones to amplify the dribbling sounds. The gallery walls and floors were gradually being destroyed around these artworks over the last week, not by construction workers, but by musicians. Three percussionists gently deconstructed the space climbing onto drywall, hacking away at rubble, and rising on scissor-lifts, making a music of sorts as they worked. The one-story building has been sold, and word from the gallery director Cristian Alexa is that Norman Foster has been retained to build a tower on the site.
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A Corian Carnival in SoHo

Fabrikator

Brooklyn-based Associated Fabrication realized all the merchandise displays, benching, shelving, and cash wraps for Melissa Shoes in Pearl Gray Corian.

Before Kinky Boots came to Broadway, Melissa Shoes opened shop in SoHo. The Brazilian shoe brand, known for its use of brightly colored, recycled PVC material and collaborations with designers like Jason Wu, Vivienne Westwood, and Gareth Pugh, opened its first U.S. boutique in the states last year. With the help of local architecture firm Eight Inc. and Brooklyn-based Associated Fabrication, a distinguished aesthetic was achieved that supports the original Sao Paulo shop's rotating art theme, but with a much cleaner slate of epoxy floors and Pearl Gray Corian bollard-like merchandise displays. Working from two-dimensional drawings provided by the architects, Jeffrey Taras of Associated Fabrication used Rhino to model the 34 display platforms. Taras grouped the displays, which resemble blunted stalagmites, into categories of varying heights and configurations—single columns in four different heights, double columns in two groupings, and one cluster of three columns.
  • Fabricators Associated Fabrication
  • Architects Eight Inc.
  • Location New York
  • Date of Completion 2012
  • Material Corian, plywood, MDF
  • Process Rhino, CNC mill
"A lot of this [project] was production engineering and breaking down the pieces into as few parts as possible to ease assembly," explained Taras. "We also had to figure out how to break the pieces down to form the Corian the way it had to be done." Each stand is hollow and constructed from five different parts of thermal-formed Corian. The base radius is made from two pieces, the shell extrusion is also two pieces, and a single portion at the top completes the unit. Since a seamless connection between the pieces was necessary to achieve the aesthetic, there was almost not tolerance for error in the fabrication process. After each stand was modeled in Rhino, the fabricators used a CNC milling machine to cut molds from plywood and medium density fiberboard. Taras created a single mold for the base ring components of all 34 stands and another uniform mold was created for the shell extrusions. Varying heights were achieved by trimming the extrusions. The caps, vary by diameter; the taller ones are smaller because of a more tapered extrusion, and the shorter ones are wider. Thus Taras created different molds for the top pieces of the varying heights. As each of the components was assembled, it was run through a trim jig to exactly meet the other seams. "The most challenging units were the double units, and the combination of three stands spliced together," Taras said. "We created a full piece assembly, created a custom jig for the CNC mill, and then cut out matching surfaces for each of the pieces that formed the units." The jig was also designed in Rhino, and cut on the CNC mill. The completed units were finely sanded and were placed as freestanding displays in the boutique. Associated Fabrication was also responsible for 18 small and six large shelves—affixed to the walls with a stainless steel pin and silicone—six mirror bases, 11 benches, and two cash wraps, all made from Corian. A new table is also currently being made for the space.
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A Boost in Federal Funds Expedite Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts

Now that Congress has passed the $51 billion emergency aid package, Mayor Bloomberg is forging ahead with the recovery plans. The City will set aside $1.77 billion in federal funds dedicated to rebuilding homes, businesses, public housing and infrastructure that were damaged by Hurricane Sandy. Bloomberg did, however, warn that it could likely take a few months for the programs “to be approved and implemented.” Since the storm, the city, in conjunction with FEMA, has helped homeowners in New York through its Rapid Repairs Program. In a press conference last week, Bloomberg announced that the city will create a $350 grant program to help owners of single-family homes rebuild residences that bore the brunt of the storm, and another $250 million dedicated to “enhance the resiliency” of multi-family housing units. New York City’s public housing sustained considerable damage during the storm, which resulted in up to $785 million in damage to 257 buildings in 32 housing developments. NYCHA will receive $120 million in aid to repair and prepare buildings for future storms by taking measures such as purchasing permanent emergency generators. The city will also provide $100 million in grants to over 1,000 businesses affected by the storm. Businesses will be able to obtain loans of up to $150,000 and grants as large as $60,000.  An additional $140 million will be spent on efforts to help build infrastructure for utilities and to jumpstart economic activity in the five business zones that are located in vulnerable areas.
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A Look at Grand Central Past and Present

As New Yorkers celebrate Grand Central's Centennial, many might have forgotten, or perhaps never even knew, that the train terminal almost suffered the same fate as Penn Station and was nearly demolished in the late 1960s. This controversy made historic preservation a critical part of the conversation about development and the future of New York City. Grand Central "was a gift to preservation and left a legacy. By its influence, it will save other buildings in the future," said Frank Prial, Associate Partner at Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, the firm responsible for the restoration of Grand Central. "It is our poster child for preservation." Prial mentions that the effort to save Grand Central Terminal "grew from great community service" and with the help of city leaders such as former Mayor Ed Koch, who recently passed away, and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. Over the years, there have been renovations and updates to the building. Prial was part of the team at Beyer Blinder Belle to work on the restoration, and recalls a significant decision—to construct a new staircase on the east side, which was included in the original designs by Warren & Wetmore and Reed & Stem, but was ultimately cut because the project was "running out of money and there was no place to go on east side because they filled with tenements and slaughter houses." While some of the more conservative preservationists doubted the necessity of the new staircase, Prial says that "there was more than just an architectural need for it, not only to uphold the architects’ original intent, but also to create access to this great space below and also to encourage ciruculation and in times of emergency." Few commuters might realize that this stairwell was only built in 1998—it fits naturally within the space, and as Prial points out, is in keeping with Beaux-Arts tradition. "People are simply not aware that this stair didn’t exist. It is simpler, cleaner and more modern than original on the west side."