Posts tagged with "New Museum":

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Bowery Street Art Too Provocative for IDEAS CITY?

cryptome-sidewalk-vaults The architect of the Bowery Mission John Young of Cryptome was invited by its director Matt Krivich in March to display an art work for  the institution as part of The New Museum's just concluded IDEAS CITY street festival. Cryptome was restoring the mission's underground vaults at the time and in August of 2012 put up a wall drawing by Deborah Natsios, a principal of the firm, on the street front scaffolding called Sidewalk Vaults. This original rendering was an illusion to the long history of the vaults as an important structural element of the Bowery, the city's oldest thoroughfare. Natsios agreed to create a work and produced a series of eight panels in the style of Sidewalk Vaults that she called Partywall. This work was meant to question the relationship between the Mission and its neighbor the New Museum and the rapidly changing character of the Bowery. partywall-colonize The drawings, Natsios claims, were created, "in good faith (and) received a favorable response from the director, in his invitation to partner with the Bowery Mission during StreetFest." However the panels, it was discovered by the artists, were "taken down within 24 hours (May 2) after we were advised by the Mission of pressure from the New Museum." The director of the Mission Bowery would not comment on this story and for its part a spokesman for the New Museum claims, "the posters were not removed by the New Museum, it was the choice of the Bowery Mission. The Mission and New Museum continue to maintain a close neighborly relationship (and worked together on IDEAS CITY and other projects)." The original work by Natsios can still be seen at 229 Bowery but its a shame the other eight were not viewable during the festival.
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IDEAS CITY Winning Pavilion "MirrorMirror" To Reflect the Bowery On Saturday

The Storefront for Art and Architecture and the New Museum in New York City have announced the winners of the StreetFest Tenting Competition for their upcoming IDEAS CITY Festival, arriving Saturday in front of the New Museum on the Bowery. The international competition asked architects to re-imagine the typical street fair tent with a more compelling and sustainable form. Winner Davidson Rafailidis—lead by Georg Rafailidis and Stephanie Davidson of Buffalo—were chosen for their entry, MirrorMirror, which will premiere at 6:00pm on Saturday May 4th. Like Sir Norman Foster’s recent “Vieux Port” pavilion in Marseilles, MirrorMirror features a reflective ceiling that mirrors street level activity to create a more dynamic urban experience. Meanwhile, the pavilion’s gable roof reflects the surrounding skylines, allowing passersby to engage with nearby architecture without craning their necks. The simple design, constructed from aluminum frames and Mylar mirror foil, suggests the overarching objectives of the IDEAS CITY Festival: raising consciousness about the untapped capital of the urban environment. Last year’s winner, The Worms by New York based Family and PlayLab, will be on view once again. The other submissions for this year’s competition, over 80 in all, can be seen in an online exhibition hosted by the Storefront starting May 1st. The biennial IDEAS CITY Festival will run from May 1-4, featuring conferences and workshops, and culminating in a street festival on Saturday along Bowery, Rivington, Chrystie, and Stanton.
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Recalling 1993: The New Museum Dials A History Lesson Into Manhattan's Payphones

Craving an adventure? The New Museum dares you to travel back in time to 1993 by picking up many of thousands of Manhattan payphones and dialing the toll-free number 1-855-FOR-1993. You’ll find yourself checking your surroundings as you’re immersed into an oral history of what it was like to live on that block in 1993. The project, “Recalling 1993” is part of a larger exhibition at museum entitled NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star, named after the rock band, Sonic Youth’s eighth album recorded in 1993. The organizers of the project connected 5,000 Manhattan payphones to voice recordings left from some of the most popular personalities of the 90’s including comedian Doug E. Doug, former porn actress Robin Byrd, party promoter and club kid James St. James, radio talk show host Brian Lehrer, and CUNY’s Suzanne Wasserman. Hearing their voices recount stories of major events such as the World Trade Center bombing in the Financial District, or a wild night out at the infamous club, Limelight, in Chelsea will either leave you longing for what was or leave you feeling grateful that we’ve come such a long way. Several of the recordings recall some not-so-fond memories of a much more dangerous New York City. For example, Fernando Mateo, President of the New York State Federation of Taxi Driver remembers, “Nineteen ninety-three was a war zone in New York. Cabbies were being killed, 30 to 60 a year.” But not all the recollections are negative. Sister Kevin, who was once the director of the school of nursing at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Greenwich Village, identifies 1993 as the year in which healthcare facilities started to have greater control of the AIDS crisis. Together, the four and a half hours of voice recordings paint an accurate picture of New York during an undoubtedly pivotal year in the 1990s.
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Chutes and Ladders at the New Museum

The New Museum has been transformed into a real-life game of chutes and ladders, or perhaps a Fun Palace a la Cedric Price, for its new exhibition Carsten Höller: Experience that opened this week and is running through January 15, 2012. The centerpiece of the show is a spiraling stainless steel slide traversing the fourth through second floors and providing what certainly must be the most rapid vertical circulation in the entire city short of a plummeting elevator . We stopped by to check out the slide and, after signing our lives away on a waiver, took a couple rides ourselves. Carsten Höller, originally a scientist, is known for experimenting on others' perceptions of the world around them, and upon entering the New Museum and being confronted by a series of ten-foot-tall mushrooms lined up against the back wall, it was clear Experience would be unlike a typical museum visit. On the fourth floor, the sleek stainless steel of Höller's slide emerges from a concrete floor, offering no insight to where you might end up. Sandwiched between an unusually slow, mirrored carousel and a mobile made of bird cages (and singing live birds), the slide clearly steels the show. Once saddling up on a canvas sheet to speed your descent, the plunge down the rabbit hole only lasts a couple seconds. You don't notice others gawking at you through plastic windows as you fly through what the museum has likened to "a giant 102-foot-long pneumatic mailing system." The spiral deposits viewers on the second floor largely no worse for wear (but watch your elbows on that last turn!) and uncontrollably grinning, perhaps wondering if they had indeed just slid through three levels of an art museum. While many made a bee-line for the elevator back upstairs, we suggest taking the spiral staircase to beat the others back to the line.
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A Sculpture By Any Other Name. . .

Haters of kitsch rejoice!  No longer will visitors to the New Museum be greeted by Ugo Rondinone’s glowing, rainbow affirmation.  Hell, Yes! has been replaced as part of the museum’s ongoing Façade Sculpture Program.  In its place, Rose II, a far subtler work by German artist Isa Genzken.  Growing from the first tier of SANAA’s ethereal Bowery building, the sculpture, a 28-foot tall rose, was created in 1993 and reprised in 2007. The New Museum describes Genzken as “an artist whose work re-imagines architecture, assemblage, and installation, giving form to new plastic environments and precarious structures.”  Her art “draws on the legacies of Constructivism and Minimalism and often involves a critical open dialogue with Modernist Architecture.”  In this respect she will likely be considered a pleasant successor to Ugo Rondinone, whose Hell, Yes! garnered less than favorable reviews when the New Museum opened in December 2007. Though she lives and works in Berlin, Genzken formed a lasting bond with New York when she first visited as a student forty years ago.  Rose II, her first public work in the United States, is on extended loan from the David Zwirner Gallery, New York, and will be on view through 2011.
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Only In Brooklyn: Archostumes

Last week, we threw out some ideas for architectural-themed Halloween costumes, including a proposal for a New Museum costume. Well, we've been one-, make that twice-upped by this adorable trio, who were spotted Trick-or-Treating in Cobble Hill by a colleague. Marcel Breuer, Frank Lloyd Wright, and SANAA must be so proud.