Posts tagged with "New Jersey":

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Van Alen and National Park Service select finalists to re-imagine visitor experience at national parks

The Van Alen Institute and the National Park Service (NPS) have announced four finalists in their competition to modernize visitor experience at four national parks. While the National Parks Now competition aims to "[design] the 21st Century National Park experience,” it’s about more than launching an app or two and boosting WiFi signals. Each interdisciplinary team—which is comprised of young architects, landscape architects, graphic designers, urban planners, branding experts, engagement specialists and educators—was handed a $15,000 stipend to develop strategies to connect national parks with a new generation of visitors. This includes launching hands-on workshops, self-guided tours, interactive installations, engagement campaigns, and developing tools to give the parks a larger, and more diverse, audience. The strategies would be implemented at one of four New York City-area parks: Sagamore Hill National Historic Site in Oyster Bay, New York, the estate of President Theodore Roosevelt; Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton, Pennsylvania, a monument to the steam locomotive; Paterson Great Falls National Historic Park in Paterson, New Jersey, a birthplace of American textile manufacturing; and Weir Farm National Historic Site in Ridgefield, Connecticut, the summer estate of artist Julian Alden Weir. Next spring, one team will be crowned the winner and be given an additional $10,000 to implement one of its strategies over the summer. That prototype will serve as a model for the NPS as it celebrates its centennial in 2016. “As we look back at the 100-year legacy of the National Park Service, it’s also a perfect time to look creatively at the visitor experience at several select park units and consider new ways to share park stories and respond to audience needs," Gay Vietzke, the deputy regional director of the NPS Northeast region, said in a statement. “National Parks Now is a truly innovative—and necessary—effort to ensure national parks are relevant in the 21st century.” More on each team, and their individual proposals, courtesy of the Van Alen Institute.   Sagamore Hill:
According to the Van Alen Institute: Team Wayward / Projects is led by Putri Trisulo with Prem Krishnamurthy, Katie Okamoto, Alfons Hooikaas, Ben DuVall, Heather Ring, Amy Seek, Thomas Kendall, and Jarred Henderson. Their project, OKParks!, will create a symbiotic partnership model capitalizing on the existing audiences and curatorial resources of prominent cultural institutions to reinterpret histories and reinvigorate Sagamore Hill.
Steamtown:
According to the Van Alen Institute: Led by Abigail Smith-Hanby of FORGE with Ashley Ludwig, Andrew Dawson, Max Lozach, and CJ Gardella. Team FORGE proposes to weave together stories and information in order to root Steamtown within the larger American cultural landscape.
Paterson Great Falls:
According to the Van Alen Institute: Led by Manuel Miranda of the Yale School of Art with Frances Medina, Mariana Mogilevich, Valeria Mogilevich, June Williamson, and Willy Wong. The team will explore retrofitting the park to engage the city, retelling the site’s history to engage contemporary audiences, and representing the site to new publics.
Weir Farm:
According to the Van Alen Institute: Led by Aaron Forrest of the Rhode Island School of Design and Principal of Ultramoderne with Yasmin Vobis, Suzanne Mathew, Noah Klersfeld, Dungjai Pungauthaikan, and Jessica Forrest. The team will look at introducing site-specific, contemporary artistic practices to Weir Farm in order to develop new perspectives on the site and the region’s history and ecology.
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On View> Michael Graves: Past As Prologue

Michael Graves: Past As Prologue Grounds for Sculpture 19 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, NJ Through April 5, 2015 Celebrating 50 years of practice in art, architecture, and design, Michael Graves is the subject of a pair of exhibitions and an upcoming symposium at the Architectural League of New York. The largest of the shows is Past is Prologue, at Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, New Jersey. It presents lesser-known early works from the mid-1960s, his blockbuster works from the 1980s, to his current work, which ranges from architecture, to product design, to leading edge-work on accessibility issues. Uniting all these works is Graves’ interest—sometimes reverent, sometimes irreverent—in the images and forms of the past, and how he continuously reinterprets them for the future. A companion show, Michael Graves Paintings: Landscapes and Still-Lifes, will be on view at Studio Vendome in Manhattan.
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Kean University announces Michael Graves School of Architecture

This Saturday, Kean University, in Union, New Jersey, will launch the Michael Graves School of Architecture in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Michael Graves Architecture & Design. Over his career, Graves has racked up an impressive list of architectural accolades including the AIA Gold Medal, the National Medal of the Arts, and the Driehaus Prize for Architecture. The new school will be housed in the university's dramatic Green Lane Academic Building, designed by the Gruskin Group. Graves is designing a new facility for his school at the university's campus in Wenzhou, China. 'I think [it's] an A-plus," said Graves referring to his Wenzhou campus, in a video released by the university. "It's one of my better buildings, if not my best building. We're really pleased with it."
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New Jersey goes Brooklyn with new sustainable food hall

You can’t keep artisanal pickles, earthy micro-brews, and locally-sourced popsicle sticks in Brooklyn forever. At a certain point, these gluten-free, all-vegan treats are going to want to explore the world beyond Williamsburg. Like so many Brooklyn residents before them, they're headed for New Jersey

No, the Brooklyn Flea isn't relocating to the Garden State, but Inhabitat reported that a pre-World War I warehouse and adjacent lot in Long Branch is being transformed into a very Brooklyn-esque food hall and beer garden. According to the site, the 14,500-square-foot space has a rooftop garden and small batch brewery that will churn out "nano-brews." Aside from those tiny beers, the so-called Whitechapel Projects will also have community and arts spaces.

Fittingly, the project comes courtesy of some Brooklyn architects and designers including RAFT Landscape Architecture, Matt Burgermaster of Mabu Design, David Cunningham Architecture Planning, and Brooklyn Grange, which operates "the world's largest rooftop soil farms." The Asbury Park Press reported that bricks and timbers from the existing warehouse will be repurposed for the project and that an old elevator shaft will be preserved and topped with lights.

As Inhabitat explained, the multipurpose space could do more than dish up beers and artisanal snacks—it could have a significant economic impact for the Jersey Shore: "The Whitechapel Projects’ progressive-minded mission combined with a prime beachside location is expected to be immensely supportive to the local economy of Long Branch, New Jersey, a previously grief-stricken area post-Sandy." The project is expected to open next summer.  

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Video> How the Bayonne Bridge’s roadway will be lifted 64 feet

The 82-year-old Bayonne Bridge is getting some work done. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has begun the $1.3 billion process to raise the bridge's roadway by 64 feet. Why, exactly? Well, to keep up with the times of course. To accommodate larger shipping container–laden boats, the authority decided that the structure, which connects New Jersey with Staten Island, had to be raised. "The expansion of the Panama Canal is expected to result in a shift to larger, cleaner, more-efficient ships servicing our region and other East Coast markets," explained the Port Authority on its website. "In order to ensure these new ships can reach our ports, the clearance limitation must be addressed." And, apparently, the quickest and most cost-effective way to address that is to keep the main structure intact and just raise the roadway itself—hence the "Raise the Roadway" project. When all is said and done, the road's surface will be 215 feet high and include a 12-foot-wide shared bike lane and pedestrian path. According to the authority, this design also "allows for future mass transit service." The project is slated to take four years, but the Port Authority is running things, so go ahead and tack on a few more years to that. In the meantime, check out the authority's strangely mesmerizing video on the construction process to get a sense of how this will all go down—or, rather, up.
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Was The Revel Casino’s Design Its Fatal Flaw?

Two years ago, AN visited the newly-opened Revel Casino in Atlantic City. At the time, the glassy $2.4 billion complex, designed by Arquitectonica and BLT Architects, was expected to be a transformative property for the iconic boardwalk that offered gambling, convention space, and entertainment. "It's more of an urban development plan than a typical casino plan," Revel CEO Kevin DeSanctis told AN. "I am really hoping that we are successful." In mid-August, we learned that they were not. In its short two-and-a-half year lifespan, the casino never turned a profit. The casino's parent company recently  announced that they weren't able to find a buyer for the bankrupt complex and that Revel's last day would be September 10th. That date has already been moved up—the hotel will now close on September 1st, Labor Day. The casino will close the day after, which will put over 3,000 people out of work. Revel's huge cost, and its very short lifespan, has unsurprisingly received lots of attention, but its closing is just the latest sign of trouble in Atlantic City—the Showboat will close on August 31st, Trump Plaza calls it quits on September 16th, and the Atlantic Club shuttered in January. These closings reflect Atlantic City's challenge to stay relevant amongst more competition. The Philadelphia Inquirer recently noted that Atlantic City, which had been the nation's second-largest gambling market ranking just behind Nevada, has now fallen behind Pennsylvania. But in terms of Revel, specifically, its design may have been its fatal flaw. “The enormous cost of the property, its vast size and its peculiar configuration—patrons had to ride a steep escalator from the lobby to get to the casino, the 57-story hotel and the restaurants—made it difficult to turn a profit,” reported the New York Times. These sentiments were echoed by industry experts who spoke to the Inquirer in June. They mentioned the "long distance between the casino floor and the hotel's front desk, a casino floor that fails to engage gamblers, and vast empty spaces that make Revel expensive to heat and cool." And Alan R. Woinski, chief executive of Gaming USA Corp, pulled no punches when describing his thoughts on the property. "The best thing that could have happened to that property is Hurricane Sandy, instead of nailing Seaside Heights, would have nailed that property. That thing should have wound up in the ocean instead of the roller coaster," he told the publication. "It's sad, but unfortunately that was the only way, to completely knock the thing down and redo it."
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Rutgers Campus Cornerstone by TEN Arquitectos

Parallel facade systems in contrasting materials mark the edge of development on a reimagined campus.

The new Rutgers Business School in Piscataway, New Jersey, is more than a collection of classrooms and offices. The building, designed by TEN Arquitectos, is a linchpin of the university’s Livingston campus, reconceived as an urban center for graduate studies and continuing education. “It established a frame,” said project manager James Carse, whose firm created a vision plan for the campus starting in the late 2000s. “We were interested in really marking the edge of campus to motivate future development to respect the campus boundary, rather than allowing or suggesting that this was a pervasive sprawl. We wanted to make sure this would set a pattern where infill would happen.” The Rutgers Business School’s tripartite envelope reinforces the distinction between outside and inside. While the sides of the building facing the boundary line are enclosed in folded anodized aluminum panels, the glass curtain walls opposite create a visual dialogue with the rest of campus. In TEN Arquitectos’ early designs, the difference between the building’s outer and inner surfaces was not so stark. “We initially thought of [the entire envelope] as being more open,” said Carse. But budget constraints combined with university requirements regarding glazing in classrooms to suggest that the architects move away from an all-glass enclosure. “There was an ability to deploy the curtain wall over only a certain amount of the building in a responsible way,” said Carse. “We let the inside push back against the outside and suggest that this be more solid.” At the same time, explained Carse, “we didn’t want it to feel unchanging and heavy.” Working with  Front Inc., TEN Arquitectos designed an anodized aluminum rain screen system, manufactured by Mohawk Metal Manufacturing & Sales, that incorporates an apparently random fold pattern to provide texture. (Thorton Tomasetti provided additional consulting and inspection services during construction.) After making aesthetic modifications in Rhino and 3ds Max, the architects ran their digital model through eQUEST energy analysis software to determine an angle of inclination that would prevent snow from accumulating on the folds. They came up with four standard dimensions that could be combined for a varied effect. “It’s a pretty amazing condition that’s been created with the variegated folded panels that face Avenue E and preserve and pick up the western sunlight as the sun sets,” said Carse. “The building changes throughout the day and picks up texture from its surroundings. The anodized aluminum plays off that nature of change and creates a softer facade than you’d expect from the use of metal itself.”
  • Facade Manufacturer Beijing Jangho Curtain Wall Co., Mohawk Metal Manufacturing & Sales
  • Architects TEN Arquitectos
  • Facade Consultant Front Inc., Thornton Tomasetti (consulting and inspection during construction)
  • Facade Installer Jangho, Metro Glass Inc.
  • Location Piscataway, NJ
  • Date of Completion 2013
  • System folded anodized aluminum rain screen, frit glass curtain wall, transparent glass curtain wall
  • Products custom folded anodized aluminum panels from Mohawk Metal, frit glass and transparent glass from Xinyi Glass Holdings Limited
The campus-facing sides of the building feature frit glass curtain walls fabricated by Beijing Jangho Curtain Wall Co. (Jangho) with glass from Xinyi Glass Holdings Limited. “We used the fritted glass to meet the solar performance that we were going for without completely exposing them,” said Carse, who noted that the walls appear nearly transparent at dusk and later, when the interior lights are on. “That’s part of the nature of the building,” he said. “The business school itself has classes going from around 8:30 a.m. until about 10 p.m., so the daily life is not just during the day. The building is really alive during those times and we wanted to make that evident.” During the day, the frit glass facade’s extra-wide mullions maximize the amount of daylight that filters into the offices and classrooms. The third component of the Rutgers Business School envelope is a transparent glass curtain wall introduced between the two primary facade systems. Besides serving as an intermediary between the anodized aluminum and frit glass surfaces, the transparent glass elements mark possible points of connection to future buildings as the campus continues to densify. “It allowed us infill,” said Carse. “This project served as a gateway building literally and figuratively,” said Carse. Cars entering campus from Route 18 pass directly through the Rutgers Business School building, its upper stories perched on canted columns. Though designed to indicate the campus’s outside edge—the end of development—the structure’s vital facade simultaneously signals a beginning, a freshly urban approach to campus design within a former suburban stronghold.  
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Port Authority Makes it Rain on Man from Spain: Calatrava Paid for Uncommissioned Work

According to a report in the Bergen Record, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey gave Santiago Calatrava, the renowned Spanish architect whose lust for gold is as vigorous as that of his conquistador forebears, $500,000 for two bridge designs that will not be built and to which Calatrava will retain the copyrights. Sound shady? Anyone who has had the opportunity to use the Port Authority Bus Terminal will not be surprised to find out that it is. In 2012, two Port Authority commissioners (say hello to David Steiner and Anthony Sartor, a couple of wise guys who have resigned since the check signing went down) pushed for inclusion of the world-class architect in two of the agency’s bridge projects. The first, the Goethals Bridge, which connects Elizabeth, New Jersey, and Staten Island, was already years in the making when Steiner brought Calatrava’s plans to the agency. “Beautiful but unusable” was the agency’s verdict. Steiner, however, remained undeterred. Months later, he pushed for Calatrava’s involvement on the Bayonne Bridge. The committee responded in the same way as before. But a series of hush-hush meetings and closed-door negotiations lead the Port Authority to write a check to Calatrava some months later, the official explanation being that they viewed his designs to compare them with their own. Funnily enough, Calatrava was not happy with the windfall. He asked for almost $3 million and would not give consent for the Port Authority to use the rights for the plans otherwise. Stalemate? It would seem so. $500,000 is the maximum amount the agency can spend without submitting the allocation to a public vote by governor-appointed commissioners.
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Rebuild By Design> OMA’s Plans to Protect Coastal New Jersey

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here's OMA's plan to protect The Garden State's coast. OMA sets forth a comprehensive plan for Hoboken, Jersey City, and Weehawken to mitigate flood risk and create new public space. The team protects these coastal communities through four key initiatives: hard infrastructure and soft landscape to resist storm water, urban infrastructure to delay rainwater runoff, green infrastructure to store rainwater, and water pumps and alternative routes to discharge excess water. OMA's green infrastructure and landscape designs also provide significant public space and recreational opportunities at the water's edge. "Our objectives are to manage water―for both disaster and for long-term growth; enable reasonable flood insurance premiums―through the potential redrawing of the FEMA flood zone; and deliver co-benefits―that enhance our cities," explained the team in a statement. The OMA team includes Royal HaskoningDHV; Balmori Associates; and HR&A Advisors
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Rebuild By Design> HR&A’s Commercial Corridor Resiliency Project

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here's how the team led by HR&A/Cooper Robertson plans to bring resiliency to the East Coast from the Rockaways to Red Hook. The HR&A/Cooper Robertson team focused on creating resilient communities and resilient businesses in Red Hook, the Rockaways, and Asbury Park, New Jersey. To make that possible, they propose the "Commercial Corridor Resiliency" project, which includes flood protection measures and commercial revitalization for at-risk businesses. Specifically, this includes, "behavioral modification, such as the creation of preparedness plans and use of deployable flood protection systems, and capital investment in building and tenant spaces." In Red Hook, they create the "Maker’s District," which includes dry and wet-flood-proofed buildings, as well as a raised promenade to promote public access to the water. In Far Rockaway, the team invests in transportation infrastructure and a revitalized  commercial corridor. And in Asbury Park, flood protection measures are put in place to protect the beach and local businesses. The team includes HR&A Advisors with Cooper, Robertson & Partners; Grimshaw Architects; Alamo Architects; Langan Engineering; W Architecture; Hargreaves Associates; and Urban Green Council.
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Rebuild By Design> Sasaki’s Plan To Save the Beaches of the Jersey Shore

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here’s Sasaki's plan to save the Jersey shore. The plan presented by Sasaki—along with Rutgers University and ARUP—is focused on preserving and protecting the Jersey shore's iconic beaches. "Ultimately, the Jersey Shore’s future resiliency must be linked to projects that deepen the physical extent, ecological reach, and cultural understanding of the beach," the team explained in a statement. Their plan includes moving new development from barrier islands that were severely impacted during Hurricane Sandy, to areas farther inland. According to Sasaki, this would protect development projects and diversify the tourist economy. In Asbury Park, the team creates a "hybrid boardwalk-dune"—a structure that preserves the function of a traditional boardwalk, while also providing a natural habitat and storm-surge mitigation. And for inland inland bay communities, Sasaki "[reclaims] the inland bay’s underutilized water spaces as public places."
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Rebuild By Design> WXY and West 8’s “Blue Dunes” for New York and New Jersey

In early April, the ten finalists in the Rebuild By Design competition unveiled their proposals to protect the Tri-state region from the next Sandy. And in the near future, a jury will select a winner—or winners—to receive federal funding to pursue their plans. But before that final announcement is made, AN is taking a closer look at each of the final ten proposals. Here's WXY and West 8's plan for "blue dunes." Team WXY and West 8 proposed a regional plan to protect the East Coast with a chain of "blue dunes," or coastal barriers, that stretch from Cape May, New Jersey to Cape Cod, Massachusetts. They are called "blue dunes" for their "position in the open ocean,"and the "natural landforms they mimic." These offshore dunes are essentially a way to avoid lining the Eastern Seaboard with 1700-miles of seawalls, which would disconnect coastal communities from the water.  The dunes would mitigate against storm-surge and create new habitats miles from shore. "The big question moving forward is how we align our industrial sector to take on these types of interventions regardless of scale," says Jesse Keenan, the research director at the Center for Urban Real Estate. "That is a huge, industrial mission that's on par with the space program." Team WXY/West 8 includes Dr. Alan Blumberg, Dr. Sergey Vinogradov, Dr. Thomas Herrington, Stevens Institute of Technology; Daniel Hitchings, ARCADIS; Andrew Kao, AIR Worldwide; Kate John-Alder, Rutgers University; Kei Hayashi, BJH Advisors; Maxine Griffith, Griffith Planning & Design; Yeju Choi, NowHere Office; William Morrish, Parsons the New School for Design; Jesse Keenan, CURE.