Posts tagged with "Moshe Safdie":

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Eavesdrop> Renzo Piano to deliver high design with a low-minded name in Des Moines

Downtown Des Moines, Iowa, courted an all-star list of architecture firms for a new $92 million corporate headquarters that has the unfortunate baggage of being helmed by the world’s most cringe-inducingly named and spelled convenience store chain, Kum & Go. BIG, Morphosis, SOM, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, Renzo Piano Building Workshop, and Safdie Architects all competed for what CEO Kyle Krause is calling Des Moines’ next landmark. And that landmark is going to be designed by the Piano man himself. According to the Des Moines Register, the convenience store was attracted to Piano's "ability to emphasize collaboration, transparency and light." The new building will be located between 14th and 15th streets north of the Pappajohn Sculpture Park, and locals hope the new building will take a back seat to the art on display that includes works by the likes of Jaume Plensa. The headquarters will house 300 employees in some 120,000 square feet and is expected to be complete in 2017. "What we want to do is create the best environment for our associates," Krause told the Register. "Architecturally, sure, they'll do a great job, but it's really about that inside space and what you can create inside the building that is best for our people." He added that Piano is "a great down-to-earth guy who we think can create the space that creates the transparency, the collaboration, the openness for our people to have a nice work space." Eavesdrop can’t be the only one who feels uncomfortable gassing up at this midwestern roadside retailer—but maybe a work of starchitecture can change our minds.
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Moshe Safdie gets AIA Gold and Ehrlich takes home the Firm Award

The American Institutes of Architects has bestowed its most prestigious accolade, the 2015 AIA Gold Medal, to Israeli-born, Canadian-American architect Moshe Safdie. His influential projects—such as The Yad Vashem Holocaust History Museum in Jerusalem, the Salt Lake City Library, and the Marina Bay Sands in Singapore—have spanned the globe and demonstrated a muscular, yet sensitive style that, embedded with social responsibility, prioritizes the community experience with special attention to the context of a given place and to the public realm. “I think you need to, as an architect, understand the essence of a place and create a building that feels like it resonates with the culture of a place. So my buildings in India or in Kansas City or in Arkansas or in Singapore, they come out different because the places are so different,” Safdie said in a statement. Safdie is guided often by the words of his early mentor, Louis Kahn, who asked, “What does a building want to be?” This question is both specific and overarching for Safdie, leading to different solutions regarding programming and the materiality of a building. Aesthetically, his work brings together different forms—both angular and curvilinear. “Moshe Safdie has continued to practice architecture in the purest and most complete sense of the word, without regard for fashion, with a hunger to follow ideals and ideas across the globe in his teaching, writing, practice and research,” wrote Mike Davis, president of Boston Society of Architects, in his nomination letter. Los Angeles–based Ehrlich Architects, founded and led by Steven Ehrlich, has been selected for the AIA Firm Award. The firm’s work, with its California modernist roots, incorporates diverse styles from other cultures and traditions, which is apparent in projects such as the John Roll U.S. Courthouse in Yuma, Arizona, the 700 Palms Residence in Los Angeles, ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism in Phoenix, the Ahmadu Bello University Theater in Zaria, Nigeria, and Federal National Council Parliament Building Complex in Abu Dhabi. “The marriage of the particular with the universal is one of the great virtues of the firm’s design approach, where connections between culture, climate, people and place are woven together in a distinct humanistic architecture shaped by circumstance,” Steve Dumez said in a statement.
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Ennead Architects Selected to Design Peabody Essex Museum’s New Expansion

After inviting several architecture firms to participate in a design charrette this summer, the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) in Salem, Massachusetts has selected Ennead Architects to design the museum's ambitious 175,000-square-foot expansion. This $200 million project will include new galleries, public program and education spaces, conservation and exhibition processing areas, and a restaurant. "Ennead Architects impressed us with their creative dexterity, in-depth understanding of our institution and thoughtful design solutions for the museum's complex architectural program. We celebrate their responsive, collaborative spirit and look forward to partnering with them to achieve a design that provides a superlative museum experience," said Dan Monroe, PEM's Rose-Marie and Eijk van Otterloo Director and CEO, in a statement. PEM initially chose London-based Rick Mather Architects to undertake the entire expansion project. The firm completed the first phase, including the master planning and renovation of the Dodge wing, but when founder and principal Rick Mather passed away this past spring, the museum decided to consider other firms. According to Boston.com, PEM cited the intimate size of the firm (15 architects) and Mather's "intense involvement" in the project as factors for the switch. Ennead, which employs over 100 architects, offers substantial museum experience. The firm recently wrapped up its expansion of the Yale University Art Gallery last winter, and has also cuts its teeth working on a number of other projects, such as the Brooklyn Museum, Natural History Museum of Utah, William J. Clinton Presidential Center, and the Rose Center for Earth and Space at the American Museum of Natural History. "PEM's expansion presents an exciting design challenge and an opportunity to reimagine one of the oldest and fastest growing museums in the country," said Ennead design partner Richard Olcott in a statement. This marks the second major building project that the museum has embarked on in the last ten years. Architect Moshe Safdie designed a $100 million glass and brick building expansion and renovation in 2003. The museum plans on breaking ground in 2015, and anticipates that the new wing will be unveiled in 2019. The Mathers-designed Dodge wing will reopen this October along with the revamped Art & Nature Center.