Posts tagged with "Mos":

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First Look> Inside the Chicago Architecture Biennial

AN got a firsthand look at some of the projects inside the Chicago Cultural Center, many of which are juxtaposed across media, scale, and intellectual territory. For example, simple wood models from South African studio Noero Architects' 180 Square Meters sat quietly next to a wild set of renderings by François Roche that showed digital narratives of buildings as characters in their surroundings. Nearby, an oddly-detailed full-scale mock-up of a light steel stud-framed room welcomed visitors to go inside. Here are some of our favorites from our first glimpse at the sprawling main exhibition in Chicago: "The End of Sitting" questions why we design so much of our environment for sitting, given recent research showing how unhealthy it is to sit all day. This is the first show by the radical architecture and media collective Environmental Communications. It includes a selection from 200,000 images found in a Venice, California, garage. The Rock Print load-bearing column was built using a robot that placed rocks bound by string into a mold, which was then removed to create this curious structure. Atelier Bow-Wow occupied the courtyard of the Cultural Center, which is an important place, but is often cut-off from the rest of the building. They animated the courtyard by exploring the idea of a prison as a place of potential. Amanda Williams's work on the south side of Chicago includes a set of abandoned houses painted with colors derived from pop culture in the surrounding neighborhoods. It is displayed in a hallway. MOS Architects built a house made of hallways to critique McMansions, which they see as all foyers and hallways. Its disciplinary deadpan was a great juxtaposition next to "Architecture is Everywhere" by Sou Fujimoto Architects, a series of small everyday objects, like staples and binder clips, arranged into architectural models complete with scale figures. Makeshift is an ad-hoc construction that responds to its specific site with an improvised structure for music performance. It is based on the music legacy of Chicago. The Biennial is bustling with people as well, as everyone from Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel to designers from around the world are in attendance. For ongoing Chicago Biennial coverage, check back with AN over the next few days and weeks.
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MoMA To Go House Hunting in the Burbs

The foreclosure crisis has up-ended old assumptions about the relative prosperity of cities versus suburbs. In many regions waves of foreclosures have hit the suburbs hardest. In the second iteration of their "Issues in Contemporary Architecture" residency and exhibition series, MoMA and P.S. 1 will ask five teams to design interventions for five "megaregions" facing high levels of foreclosures. Like the earlier iteration, Rising Currents, the new project, Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream will include a residency and public workshops at P.S. 1, followed by an exhibition and public programs at MoMA. Organized by Barry Bergdoll, chief curator for architecture and design, and Reinhold Martin, director of the Buell Center at Columbia, Foreclosed "will enlist five interdisciplinary teams of architects to envision a rethinking of housing and related infrastructures that could catalyze urban transformation, particularly in the country’s suburbs," according to a statement from the museum. The five multi-disciplinary teams will be led by Dan Wood and Amale Andros of WORKac, who will work on the Portland, Oregon region; New York's Michael Bell will examine Temple Terrace, Florida; Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang will focus on Cicero, Illinois; Hilary Sample and Michael Meredith have been assigned The Oranges in New Jersey, while Andrew Zago of Zago Architecture will work on Rialto, California. The teams will use a recent housing studies by the Buell Center as the grounding research for their work. "The museum will act as a kind of handmaiden for taking a body of research into form," Bergdoll told AN. "Images can inform the nascent national conversation." Bergdoll notes that the foreclosure crisis is still unfolding, and that many plans that could be leveraged to improve the situation, such as the national High-Speed Rail network, are being scaled back. The teams will likely propose housing, infrastructure, and landscape interventions. In a move tailor-made to generate conversation, during the launch of the workshop phase on May 7, "team leaders will present their approaches and a round table will offer a debate between various models of thinking about replanning suburbia, including that represented by the Congress of New Urbanism," according to a release from the museum. While Rising Currents attempted to address local conditions resulting from global problems, Foreclosed will address a national problem through an examination of five distinct sites across the country. "We expect the project to parallel the best intentions of the current administration," Bergdoll said. Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream will open at MoMA on January 31, 2012.
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East Coast Champs

The American Academy of Arts and Letters named the winners of its 2010 architecture awards Tuesday, which were dominated by northeastern designers. Long-time GSD professor Michael Van Valkenburgh is the recipient of the Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize in Architecture. The annual award of $5000 has been given to preeminent architects since 1955, ranging from Louis Kahn to Elizabeth Diller. Van Valkenburgh has designed more than 350 landscapes, including the recently opened Brooklyn Bridge Park. The Academy also announced the winners of its Academy Awards in Architecture, for strong personal work, which go to New York's planning-obsessed Architecture Research Office and the Afterpartying MOS, of New Haven and Cambridge. And City College architecture dean, critic, and designer Michael Sorkin also won an Academy Award, largely for his writing. The four winners beat out 50 nominees and were selected by academy members Henry Cobb, Hugh Hardy, Steven Holl, Laurie Olin, Billie Tsien, and Tod Williams.