Posts tagged with "The Museum of Modern Art MoMA":

Custom Fit: 4D Printed Dress Goes to MoMA

Congratulations to Nervous System, whose Kinematics Dress was just acquired by the Museum of Modern Art (a prescient, pre-emptive move that might keep the curators of the Metropolitan Museum's Costume Institute awake for nights to come). While the physical product is certainly a head-turner, it's the underlying technology that's the true wonder—and maybe of greater interest and implication to architects. In order to fit into a 3D printer, the nascent dress design had to be reduced in size. Factoring in idealized, actual, and intuitive aspects of material and performance, a computational folding program optimally shrunk the garment by 85 percent by folding it in half only twice. Comprising 2,279 unique triangular panels linked by 3,316 hinges, the nylon dress was printed as a single piece over the course of 48 hours at the Shapeways facility in New York City. It looks fabulous, but how does it feel? Nervous Systems' creative director, Jessica Rosenkranz, answers, "I would not compare the dress to any other fabrics. It's really quite different. Perhaps I would describe it as a kind of mechanical lace. While each part is rigid and has a textured feel, together they flow and fold. Fabrics often make a rustling sound, but our garment sounds more like thousands of tiny plastic wind chimes." A video documenting the fabrication of the dress was filmed at Shapeways.

On View> MoMA tackles tactical urbanism with “Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities”

Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities MoMA 11 West 53rd Street, New York, New York November 22–May 10, 2015 The population of the planet is growing quickly and an increasing number of people are living in urban areas. The resultant demographic changes, including an increase in urban poverty, pose challenges and opportunities for architects and planners in the decades ahead. How to address such a complex and global change is a question explored in the MoMA exhibition Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities. The exhibit displays proposals from six interdisciplinary teams of practitioners and researchers who studied how tactical urbanism can be deployed in New York, Rio de Janeiro, Mumbai, Lagos, Istanbul, and Hong Kong to create more vibrant and equitable cities. The proposals challenge current assumptions about the relationships between formal and informal, bottom-up and top-down urban development, and address potential changes in the roles architects and urban designers might assume. The emergent forms of tactical urbanism represented here are direct responses to alterations in the nature of public space, housing, mobility, spatial justice, environmental conditions, and other major issues in near-future urban contexts.  

Maya Lin wins Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize

Maya Lin has won the 21st annual Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize for her “outstanding and continuing artistic contributions to society and to the beauty of the world,” according to the Gish Prize Trust. The prize, which was created in 1994 through the will of actress Lillian Gish, has a cash award valued at $300,000. Previous winners of the Gish Prize include Bob Dylan, Arthur Miller, Spike Lee, and Frank Gehry. “I am deeply touched and grateful to become a part of this astonishing line of Prize winners, all of whom were selected because of the very simple but powerful goal set down by Lillian Gish: to bring recognition to the contributions that artists make to society, and to encourage others to follow on that path,” Lin said in a statement. “Because I have been donating so much of my time over the past seven years to a single long-term project, What Is Missing?, the award will make an enormous difference in enabling me to move the work forward.” The award will be presented in a ceremony at the Museum of Modern Art on November 12th.

BREAKING: Martino Stierli tapped as MoMA’s Chief Curator of Architecture and Design

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) has announced that Martino Stierli has been appointed as the Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design. Mr. Stierli is currently a professor at the University of Zurich where he teaches the history of modern architecture. Previously, he has organized or co-curated exhibitions at prestigious venues around the world, taught at multiple Swiss universities, and published multiple essays on various topics relating to design. He steps into his new role in March, 2015. “[Stierli] brings an international perspective and possesses an extraordinary ability to brilliantly relate architecture and its image to its cultural context,” MoMA’s director Glenn D. Lowry said in a statement. “With his solid grounding in the history of modern architecture and art, coupled with a keen interest in contemporary practice, Martino will be an effective and energetic leader.” Stierli lavished praise on MoMA and expressed excitement about his upcoming post. “By continually expanding its comprehensive collection, the Department of Architecture and Design has been pivotal to the preservation of modernism for the future, and to making that heritage accessible to scholars and the broader public alike,” he said in a statement released by the museum. “I am excited to continue this tradition at MoMA and look forward to working with the Museum’s extraordinary team to contribute to shaping the current discourse on architecture and the city—locally, nationally, and globally.” Barry Bergdoll, who was the Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design from 2007 to 2013, told AN, "I look forward greatly to Martino Stierli's leadership at MoMA Architecture and Design. Stierli is a creative, innovative, and astute historian and critic of modern and contemporary architecture, especially in its intersections with other artistic practices, notably photography and film. I am sure he will work with the collection, and grow it, in interesting ways, as well as develop timely and meaningful exhibitions, publications, and events. He brings a fresh vision to New York and to MoMA."

Curated or Crowd-Sourced? MoMA Taps into the Vox Pop via Kickstarter

Move over, Aalto vases and Eames coat racks: there are some fresh new works  available at the Museum of Modern Art Design Store. Sourced in partnership with Kickstarter, 24 products from 20 international designers are getting a shot at icon status over the course of four short weeks. As with the standard stock of the MoMA store, timepieces, toys, and techy items are well represented among these limited editions. An elegant, spare wooden wristwatch by Lorenzo Buffa (716 backers on Kickstarter) is offered in light and dark finishes, with an innovative bonded-wood and leather strap. Created by art professors Pablo Garcia and Golan Levin, the NeoLucida Drawing Aid (11,406 backers) is a portable, prism-based tool that projects the subject matter of a sketch onto a sheet of blank paper, so it can be easily traced. The Powerslayer Phone Charger Kit (597 backers), designed by Justin Champaign and Velvetwire, detects when your smartphone is fully charged, and then frugally breaks the power connection, saving both money and battery life. Emmanuel Platt, the director of merchandising of MoMA’s retail division, came to the museum from another bastion of fine design: The Conran Shop, where he was president of U.S. operations. “We were inspired to pursue this project because so many of the most impressive, new, and innovative products we have been finding lately kept leading up back to Kickstarter,” he said in a statement. “It became clear that Kickstarter is an important new way for good design to come into being, and we wanted to celebrate that.” The Kickstarter collection will be available from through June 16. And there’s a launch party tonight during New York Design week [aka #NYCxDesign] on May 19 at the MoMA Design Store SoHo from 6:00 to 9:00. Meet the makers, eat & drink, and drink & eat. Be polite and RSVP to rsvp_momastore@moma.org.

Annual Ranking Lists the Top Architecture & Design Exhibitions of 2013

What was the most popular architecture or design exhibition in 2013? If you guessed MoMA's Le Corbusier spectacular or SFMOMA's landmark Lebbeus Woods: Architect (coming to New York's Drawing Center April 15) you're close but off the mark. In fact the most popular architecture exhibition in the world, according to The Art Newspaper's 2013 Visitors Figures was MoMA's Henri Labrouste exhibition that drew 438,680 viewers (4,100 a day) compared to the Le Corbusier show that had 405,000 visitors (4,010 a day). In fact, MoMA had the top three architecture exhibitions in the world last year with their 9+1 Ways of Being Political the third most attended exhibition with 2,594 visitors a day during its eight-month run on 53rd Street. Lebbeus Woods: Architect was the fourth-most-attended architecture exhibition with 210,122 (2,287 a day). With both Le Corbusier and Henri Labrouste in the top fifty exhibitions of any kind worldwide, clearly MoMA curator Barry Bergdoll has done something right in his time at the museum.

On View> MoMA Presents “Isa Genzken: Retrospective” Through March 10

Isa Genzken: Retrospective Museum of Modern Art New York Through March 10, 2014 In the home stretch before it closes on March 10, Isa Genzken: Retrospective at MoMA shows a sculptor whose work is infused with architecture from her sleek early works of lacquered wood in the engineered Hyperbolos and Ellipsoids series to rougher experiments in plaster, concrete, and steel which resemble architectural maquettes on pedestals including Bank (1985), Rosa Zimmer (Pink Room) (1987), Galerie (1987), Kleiner Pavilion (1989), and Fenster (Window) (1990). The architecture of Berlin and New York inspired some of her most significant work. It tackles subjects like the disposable global culture, the relationship between architecture and site, form and space. Fuck the Bauhaus, New Buildings for New York (2000), New Buildings for Berlin (2004), and Der Amerikanische Raum (The American Room) (2004) are the result: colorful, energetic, and made of many found and industrial materials. Genzken has lived in New York and was there on 9/11, which prompted a series of installations, Ground Zero (2008), and a play called Empire/Vampire (2003) with two protagonists, the Empire State Building and Chrysler Building (video and sculptural set designs). On a more personal note, she has made architectural personification of artist friends including Dan Graham and Wolfgang Tilmans, titled by their first names: Andy, Isa, Dan, Wolfgang, Kai. Catch it.

Folk Art Facade to be Preserved, Though Likely Not on 53rd Street

The New York Times is reporting that MoMA has decided to disassemble the white bronze facade of the American Folk Art Museum building, designed by Tod Williams and Billie Tsien. A controversial expansion plan, by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, calls for the demolition of the building to make way for a new "art bay" and circulation to new galleries in an adjacent tower designed by Jean Nouvel. MoMA director Glen Lowry told the Times, "We will take the facade down, piece by piece, and we will store it. We have made no decision about what happens subsequently, other than the fact that we’ll have it and it will be preserved." The move is a significant change by the Modern, which has been generally dismissive of the building's architectural significance. In an additional interview, Liz Diller objected to the idea that the bronze facade should be reattached to the expanded MoMA on 53rd street, calling that approach a “token gesture to a history.” She added: “We think of buildings synthetically. Facades and buildings and their organization, their logic, are tied entirely together.”

Bronze on Your Hands: Diller Scofidio + Renfro Faces Folk Museum Backlash

Liz Diller faced down a hostile crowd at the recent “MoMA Expansion Conversation,” hosted by the Architectural League, the Municipal Art Society, and AIA New York. Apparently she’s had some practice. One elder statesman of the New York architecture community reports that Diller made a series of phone calls to prominent architects prior to the public release of MoMA’s plans asking for their advice and support. This gray eminence apparently told her the firm should resign from the commission. At which point Ric Scofidio apparently chimed in, saying, succinctly, “Never!” An editor from another publication reports rumors of dissent within Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Apparently some associates in the firm have asked not to work on the project, fearing a Scarlet Letter on their resumes.

The MoMA Folk Art Museum Debate, Now on Video

The Architecture League of New York has released a video of the discussion convened last week to discuss to MoMA's planned expansion. The move, which entails the demolition of the adjacent American Folk Art Museum, is a contentious one and has sparked much debate within the architectural community. Tuesday's conversation included contributions from the Museum's director, Glenn Lowry, Elizabeth Diller (principal of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, who is overseeing the project), and a slew of other architects, journalists, and theorists who all questioned MoMA's decision to do away with their Tod Williams Billie Tsien-designed neighbor.

Forum or Wake? MoMA’s Expansion Plans Spark Debate

Nearly 650 people crowded the auditorium at the Society for Ethical Culture on Manhattan's Upper West Side on Tuesday to debate MoMA's expansion plans, which include the demolition of the Tod Williams Billie Tsien–designed American Folk Art Museum (AFAM) building. Organized by the Architectural League of New York, the Municipal Art Society, and the AIA New York Chapter, the event was packed with prominent members of the design community. MoMA Director Glen Lowry and chief curator of painting and sculpture Ann Temkin spoke of the Museum's growing collection and their need to show art from the "immediate past," the 20th Century, alongside art from the present, and cited large recent acquisitions like the Fluxus and Frank Lloyd Write collections. Liz Diller of Diller Scofidio + Renfro gave an earnest presentation, repeating her firm's desire and lengthy investigations to save the Folk Art building, calling Williams and Tsien "admired colleagues." Rectifying the alignment of the floors of AFAM with MoMA and creating easy circulation between buildings proved impossible, she said, without destroying the "integrity" of the AFAM building. Cranbrook Academy director Reed Kroloff then led a panel discussion on the expansion plans. Former New York Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff dismissed the architectural merits of the AFAM building, calling it flawed, and comparing it to Edward Durrell Stone's Two Columbus Circle. Cathleen McGuigan, editor-in-chief of Architectural Record, called the building important and urged the Modern to move more slowly with their demolition plans. Columbia preservation professor Jorge Otero-Pailos said the problem called for a rethinking of what preservation means and about the particular qualities of the AFAM building (some of his work involves the senses, and he praised the "olfactory quality" of the AFAM building, while saying MoMA had "an airport smell"). Architectural consultant and writer Karen Stein questioned Diller's assertion that circulation should be a defining feature of the project, and argued that MoMA had an obligation to the discipline of architecture to save the Williams Tsien building or some piece of it. Architect Stephen Rustow, who worked for KPF on the Taniguchi MoMA expansion, praised Diller, Scofidio + Renfro for addressing MoMA's programmatic goals, but questioned if the institution had framed those goals too narrowly, thereby eliminating any possibility of saving the AFAM building. Simultaneous to the action in the auditorium, an equally lively debate was happening on social media, with competing twitter hashtags, #MoMAConvo (promoted by the Modern) and #folkmoma (initiated by activists trying to save the AFAM structure). Several people on twitter questioned if the event was a forum or a wake. Following the discussion, Lowry, Temkin, and Diller returned to the stage, and it became clear that the building's fate is set. "Our decision has been made," Lowry said. Responding to a question about the value of architecture versus art, Lowry underscored his point. "We don't collect buildings."

On View> MoMA Presents “Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal”

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal Museum of Modern Art 11 West 53 Street, New York, NY February 1 to June 1 Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal will represent the first exhibit resulting from the recent join acquisition of the architect’s archives by MoMA and Columbia University’s Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library. The models, drawings, and films found within the extensive collection will allow the museum to illustrate the tension in Wright’s urban thinking in the 1920s and 30s. Even as he undertook projects that contributed to the increasingly vertical nature of American cities, he created a radical horizontal vision of urban life known as Broadacre City. The elaborate model of this agrarian metropolis created by Wright and his students will be displayed alongside the architect’s designs for the San Francsico Call Building, Mahattan’s St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie Towers, and a largely theoretical mile-high skyscraper.