Posts tagged with "The Museum of Modern Art MoMA":

Ever-growing MoMA splits its controversial expansion plans into three phases

When MoMA debuted its Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R)–led expansion and renovation plans in 2014, the reaction from the public was overwhelmingly negative. Those plans called for demolishing the Tod Williams and Billie Tsien–designed American Folk Art Museum and creating a glass curtain wall that would open MoMA's entire first floor to the public, for free. It's not the free part critics took issue with: It was the perceived chaos of the museum-goer experience and wholesale destruction of the folk art museum. MoMA took note, and pulled plans back. This week, revised plans were revealed. DS+R is still the architect (with Gensler), and the original objective—to create unfettered movement between galleries—remains. But a lot has also changed. Plans call for connecting galleries in Jean Nouvel’s planned residential tower at West 53rd Street, the new DS+R addition, galleries in the site of the former American Folk Art Museum, and the current MoMA building to broaden public access and accommodate skyrocketing attendance. Renovations and new construction will add 50,000 square feet of exhibition space, and expand the lobbies. When construction is complete, MoMA will be 744,000 square feet, or 17 percent, larger than it is today. The fluidity of the program, museum officials and observers contend, signal MoMA’s move away from traditional departmental categories towards more interdisciplinary collaboration. Martino Stierli, the museum’s chief curator of architecture and design, told the New York Times that MoMA is “really using this moment of renovation to explore other ways to see our collection—looking at how media can interact. We want to make use of this time to try new things.” Given the museum's increasing popularity, more people will see these new concepts in practice. Since 2004, the year that Yoshio Taniguchi's $858 million addition opened to the public, the collection has grown by 40 percent, the number of yearly exhibitions has increased from 15 to 35, membership has reached 150,000, and attendance has doubled to three million annual visitors. The project is being split into three phases so the museum will not have to close completely. DS+R’s structure will be the last of the three: The first phase will be changes to the Lauder Building, where audiences now enter for film screenings, followed by renovations to the Taniguchi building. The Lauder building's east lobby will be expanded to improve crowd flow to the main lobby, and the gift shop and bookstore will be moved below ground to facilitate the expansion. Broadening public access will be achieved by different means than those put forth in the plan's first iteration. A new public entrance to the 54th Street sculpture garden was nixed due to security concerns. The “Art Bay," a retractable glass door would have allowed museumgoers to enter ground-floor galleries straight from the street, has also disappeared from plans. Instead, the first floor will have a free gallery with two exhibition spaces (one double height, for MoMA's Project Series) that's open to the public, but accessed through the museum lobby. A new canopy and a double height ceiling at the 53rd Street entrance will give extra visibility to the museum's main entrance. The double height ceiling will displace the media gallery, whose contents could be moved to a fourth floor gallery for media and performance. To accommodate larger pieces, or pieces of the future whose spatial requirements cannot yet be determined, none of the new galleries will have permanent walls, and collections galleries will be almost column-free. The four third-floor galleries (including galleries for architecture, photography, drawings, and special exhibition) will be merged into two galleries of 10,000 and 5,000 square feet. Glass, steel, and stone will be traded for a warmer palette to unify the changes. Construction on the $390 to $400 million project will begin next month. Although completion is contingent on the project timeline of the Nouvel building, all construction is expected to be complete by 2019 or 2020.

MoMA names Sean Anderson associate curator of the Department of Architecture and Design

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York has selected Sean Anderson as its new associate curator in the department of architecture and design. Anderson will work alongside fellow department employees to create collections, exhibitions, and public programs that focus on contemporary architecture. Anderson will also assist in managing MoMA's Issues in Contemporary Architecture exhibition series and the Young Architects Program, as well as serve as the main contact for both local and global architecture communities. He holds degrees in architectural design and the history of architecture and urban development from Cornell University, a master’s degree in architectural design from Princeton University, and a PhD in art history from the University of California, Los Angeles. Anderson most recently served as the senior lecturer of design and history and undergraduate program director at the University of Sydney in Australia, and he has worked as an architect in Afghanistan, India, Morocco, Sri Lanka, and the United States. "As both an architect and an academic, Sean brings a unique and global perspective to contemporary architecture. He has the capacity to balance the experience of practicing architecture with an intellectually rigorous inquiry into the field, framing contemporary issues in a fascinating and engaging way. We are excited to have him expand our curatorial understanding of contemporary architecture," Martino Stierli, Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, said in a statement. Anderson’s appointment will be effective on November 30, 2015.

On View> MoMA presents “Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture”

Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture Museum of Modern Art The Robert Menschel Architecture and Design Gallery 11 West 53rd Street, New York Through March 6, 2016 The Museum of Modern Art pays homage to the single-family home in Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture, a rich exhibition comprised of photographs, drawings, video, installations, and architectural models from MoMA’s collection. It showcases the artistic endeavors of both architects and artists alike with works that span seven decades. Intriguing house designs—ranging from historical projects by Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, to new acquisitions from Smiljan Radic and Asymptote Architecture—are juxtaposed with visions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Mario Merz, and Rachel Whiteread. The inspiration for the exhibit’s name is Frederick Kiesler’s "Endless House," shown in the 1960 MoMA show Visionary Architecture. Courtesy MoMA

AN Exclusive: Andres Jaque Explains Why This Year’s YAP Winner “COSMO” Is Being Built In Spain

Each year, the MoMA/PS1 Young Architect’s Program features an exciting design by an up-and-coming architect in the courtyard for the Warm-Up series. This year Madrid- and New York–based Andres Jaque and his Office for Political Innovation will build a huge, roving sprinkler system called COSMO that will surely liven up the event. However, it is different from years past: It will be built in Spain and shipped over by boat. Why? “Architecture is no longer about sign or form,” Jaque told AN. “It is about social networks, and how materials move through those networks. Architecture is nothing if it doesn’t engage these networks.” The design for COSMO is made from off-the-rack parts that are not altered in anyway as they are assembled on site. They remain as generic as possible so that they can be reused more easily. “We are designing them so that we don’t have to cut them. If we cut them we would be minimizing their reuse potential.” This could mean making something locally, or shipping it globally. It is a rethinking of what something means to be local. Much of COSMO could be made anywhere in the world. The parts are put together with wires, which are also reusable. The novel tectonics of COSMO are derived from the new, specific ways that the generic parts are put together. When the parts are allowed to have life after architecture, they take on 2nd and 3rd lives elsewhere. “It is a new way to relate to the land,” Jaque said, “It is an alternative to consumption. We want to give things more lives. It is a different culture of materiality that we want to bring to PS1.” Irrigations systems have been a recurring theme in Jaque’s work. He sees them as one of the original and most complete, open source knowledge systems. Since the 1940s, the collective intelligence of irrigation systems have been evolving so that anyone can use the technology. This radical way of thinking about objects and their networks is something the Spanish architect has researched extensively over his career, since growing up. “My family comes from Madrid but also from Aquitaine in France. Both parts of my family had their lives divided between cities and countryside. In France I remember spending summers looking and playing with the centered pivot irrigation systems that my uncle had in his farm,” said Jaque. “I also saw the way he transformed them and exchange parts of it with his neighbors. I guest it all started with that. It was part of a neighbors-based economy.” COSMO is not the first PS1 project to give afterlife to building materials. Past winners such as SO-IL, CODA, HWKN, and Interboro Partners have used ready-made parts that can be re-used after the summer, such as scaffolding, ping-pong tables, skateboard decks, and a host of other objects. “Billion Oyster Pavilion,” one of the 2015 Figment pavilions on Governor’s Island, is specifically designed to be thrown into the New York Harbor later this summer, where it will take on new life as an oyster habitat. According to Jaque, bringing in parts from all over the world is actually better for the environment. This new, global way of producing an architecture is actually more energy-efficient and causes less emissions, due to the sheer volume of freight that a boat can handle compared to a truck. So shipping tires from Turkey is better for the environment than bringing them from somewhere in the U.S., since New York has a harbor. The team also found irrigation pyramids in Spain, where they were more easily procured. The parts are expected to arrive in New York sometime in May, and should be ready for the June 27 opening Warm-Up.

BOFFO honors SHoP Architects at its annual Narcissists’ Ball

Monday night in the garden of Nolita’s Elizabeth Street Gallery, the New York–based arts organization BOFFO held its annual Narcissists’ Ball, a Spring benefit in support of art, fashion, and design. SHoP Architects was honored in the "Architecture" category, and Martino Stierli, Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, gave a speech to acknowledge their work. Stierli spoke of SHoP’s winning MoMA/PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP) entry, Dunescape. The 2000 installation made them the first in a line of elite New York architects to get a boost from YAP. “From a relatively small and unknown practice, SHoP Architects in the meantime has transformed into one of the key players in the New York architectural scene,” Stierli said of the architects, “They have not only pioneered next-generation fabrication techniques based on digital algorithms that have produced beautiful surface textures and highly innovative facade designs, but have also contributed urbanist projects that have helped to rethink how space in this city can be better organized formally as well as socially." The BOFFO organization is rising fast in the New York arts community, and it has pioneered architectural collaboration with the Building Fashion series, a collaboration between fashion designers and up-and-coming architects, resulting in some of the most exciting pop-up stores in the city. They have featured architects such as Bittertang, Neihauser + Valle, Marc Fornes, and Snarkitecture.

Madrid’s Andres Jacque wins MoMA PS1 2015 Young Architects Program

MoMA and MoMA PS 1 have announced the winner of the 2015 Young Architects Program from a shortlist of five firms: Andres Jacque Architects/Office for Political Innovation. Based in Madrid and New York, Jacque's firm will build COSMO, a large structure made of irrigation tubes and planted zones, which will make the process of water filtration visible to PS 1 visitors. The structure will contain 3,000 gallons of water which will take four days to complete the cycle of purification through the structure. Seating and performance areas will be located underneath the suspended structure, which, when illuminated at night, will become a beacon in the neighborhood. The project is intended as a prototype, which could be recreated anywhere in the world to create fresh drinking water. "This year's proposal takes one of the Young Architects Program's essential requirements—providing a water feature for leisure and fun—and highlights water itself as a scarce resource," said Pedro Gadanho, a curator of architecture and design at MoMA, in a statement. "Relying on off-the-shelf components from agro-industrial origin, an exuberant mobile architecture celebrates water-purification processes and turns their intricate visualization into an unusual backdrop." COSMO will open in late June as a part of the annual Warm Up summer party series at MoMA PS 1. The Young Architects Program has become on the world's leading showcases for emerging architectural talent.

Custom Fit: 4D Printed Dress Goes to MoMA

Congratulations to Nervous System, whose Kinematics Dress was just acquired by the Museum of Modern Art (a prescient, pre-emptive move that might keep the curators of the Metropolitan Museum's Costume Institute awake for nights to come). While the physical product is certainly a head-turner, it's the underlying technology that's the true wonder—and maybe of greater interest and implication to architects. In order to fit into a 3D printer, the nascent dress design had to be reduced in size. Factoring in idealized, actual, and intuitive aspects of material and performance, a computational folding program optimally shrunk the garment by 85 percent by folding it in half only twice. Comprising 2,279 unique triangular panels linked by 3,316 hinges, the nylon dress was printed as a single piece over the course of 48 hours at the Shapeways facility in New York City. It looks fabulous, but how does it feel? Nervous Systems' creative director, Jessica Rosenkranz, answers, "I would not compare the dress to any other fabrics. It's really quite different. Perhaps I would describe it as a kind of mechanical lace. While each part is rigid and has a textured feel, together they flow and fold. Fabrics often make a rustling sound, but our garment sounds more like thousands of tiny plastic wind chimes." A video documenting the fabrication of the dress was filmed at Shapeways.

On View> MoMA tackles tactical urbanism with “Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities”

Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities MoMA 11 West 53rd Street, New York, New York November 22–May 10, 2015 The population of the planet is growing quickly and an increasing number of people are living in urban areas. The resultant demographic changes, including an increase in urban poverty, pose challenges and opportunities for architects and planners in the decades ahead. How to address such a complex and global change is a question explored in the MoMA exhibition Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities. The exhibit displays proposals from six interdisciplinary teams of practitioners and researchers who studied how tactical urbanism can be deployed in New York, Rio de Janeiro, Mumbai, Lagos, Istanbul, and Hong Kong to create more vibrant and equitable cities. The proposals challenge current assumptions about the relationships between formal and informal, bottom-up and top-down urban development, and address potential changes in the roles architects and urban designers might assume. The emergent forms of tactical urbanism represented here are direct responses to alterations in the nature of public space, housing, mobility, spatial justice, environmental conditions, and other major issues in near-future urban contexts.  

Maya Lin wins Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize

Maya Lin has won the 21st annual Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize for her “outstanding and continuing artistic contributions to society and to the beauty of the world,” according to the Gish Prize Trust. The prize, which was created in 1994 through the will of actress Lillian Gish, has a cash award valued at $300,000. Previous winners of the Gish Prize include Bob Dylan, Arthur Miller, Spike Lee, and Frank Gehry. “I am deeply touched and grateful to become a part of this astonishing line of Prize winners, all of whom were selected because of the very simple but powerful goal set down by Lillian Gish: to bring recognition to the contributions that artists make to society, and to encourage others to follow on that path,” Lin said in a statement. “Because I have been donating so much of my time over the past seven years to a single long-term project, What Is Missing?, the award will make an enormous difference in enabling me to move the work forward.” The award will be presented in a ceremony at the Museum of Modern Art on November 12th.

BREAKING: Martino Stierli tapped as MoMA’s Chief Curator of Architecture and Design

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) has announced that Martino Stierli has been appointed as the Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design. Mr. Stierli is currently a professor at the University of Zurich where he teaches the history of modern architecture. Previously, he has organized or co-curated exhibitions at prestigious venues around the world, taught at multiple Swiss universities, and published multiple essays on various topics relating to design. He steps into his new role in March, 2015. “[Stierli] brings an international perspective and possesses an extraordinary ability to brilliantly relate architecture and its image to its cultural context,” MoMA’s director Glenn D. Lowry said in a statement. “With his solid grounding in the history of modern architecture and art, coupled with a keen interest in contemporary practice, Martino will be an effective and energetic leader.” Stierli lavished praise on MoMA and expressed excitement about his upcoming post. “By continually expanding its comprehensive collection, the Department of Architecture and Design has been pivotal to the preservation of modernism for the future, and to making that heritage accessible to scholars and the broader public alike,” he said in a statement released by the museum. “I am excited to continue this tradition at MoMA and look forward to working with the Museum’s extraordinary team to contribute to shaping the current discourse on architecture and the city—locally, nationally, and globally.” Barry Bergdoll, who was the Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design from 2007 to 2013, told AN, "I look forward greatly to Martino Stierli's leadership at MoMA Architecture and Design. Stierli is a creative, innovative, and astute historian and critic of modern and contemporary architecture, especially in its intersections with other artistic practices, notably photography and film. I am sure he will work with the collection, and grow it, in interesting ways, as well as develop timely and meaningful exhibitions, publications, and events. He brings a fresh vision to New York and to MoMA."

Curated or Crowd-Sourced? MoMA Taps into the Vox Pop via Kickstarter

Move over, Aalto vases and Eames coat racks: there are some fresh new works  available at the Museum of Modern Art Design Store. Sourced in partnership with Kickstarter, 24 products from 20 international designers are getting a shot at icon status over the course of four short weeks. As with the standard stock of the MoMA store, timepieces, toys, and techy items are well represented among these limited editions. An elegant, spare wooden wristwatch by Lorenzo Buffa (716 backers on Kickstarter) is offered in light and dark finishes, with an innovative bonded-wood and leather strap. Created by art professors Pablo Garcia and Golan Levin, the NeoLucida Drawing Aid (11,406 backers) is a portable, prism-based tool that projects the subject matter of a sketch onto a sheet of blank paper, so it can be easily traced. The Powerslayer Phone Charger Kit (597 backers), designed by Justin Champaign and Velvetwire, detects when your smartphone is fully charged, and then frugally breaks the power connection, saving both money and battery life. Emmanuel Platt, the director of merchandising of MoMA’s retail division, came to the museum from another bastion of fine design: The Conran Shop, where he was president of U.S. operations. “We were inspired to pursue this project because so many of the most impressive, new, and innovative products we have been finding lately kept leading up back to Kickstarter,” he said in a statement. “It became clear that Kickstarter is an important new way for good design to come into being, and we wanted to celebrate that.” The Kickstarter collection will be available from through June 16. And there’s a launch party tonight during New York Design week [aka #NYCxDesign] on May 19 at the MoMA Design Store SoHo from 6:00 to 9:00. Meet the makers, eat & drink, and drink & eat. Be polite and RSVP to rsvp_momastore@moma.org.

Annual Ranking Lists the Top Architecture & Design Exhibitions of 2013

What was the most popular architecture or design exhibition in 2013? If you guessed MoMA's Le Corbusier spectacular or SFMOMA's landmark Lebbeus Woods: Architect (coming to New York's Drawing Center April 15) you're close but off the mark. In fact the most popular architecture exhibition in the world, according to The Art Newspaper's 2013 Visitors Figures was MoMA's Henri Labrouste exhibition that drew 438,680 viewers (4,100 a day) compared to the Le Corbusier show that had 405,000 visitors (4,010 a day). In fact, MoMA had the top three architecture exhibitions in the world last year with their 9+1 Ways of Being Political the third most attended exhibition with 2,594 visitors a day during its eight-month run on 53rd Street. Lebbeus Woods: Architect was the fourth-most-attended architecture exhibition with 210,122 (2,287 a day). With both Le Corbusier and Henri Labrouste in the top fifty exhibitions of any kind worldwide, clearly MoMA curator Barry Bergdoll has done something right in his time at the museum.