Posts tagged with "Mixed-Use":

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"A Bit of the Upper West Side in the Valley"

  Roger Ferris + Partners's Screenland Lofts signal high-rise living over the hills of Los Angeles. For those who know Burbank, it's a city synonymous with film and television industries, namely NBC, Disney, Warner Brothers, and Nichelodeon. Well, movie studios and soon the country’s largest IKEA store. One thing Burbank is not known for, at least not yet, is high-density urban housing. That could change when Westport, Connecticut-based Roger Ferris + Partners’s proposed 14 story Screenland Lofts break ground later this year. Currently in the permitting stages of development, the 170 foot high articulated monolith will feature ground floor retail topped by a shared terrace, 40 new two-bedroom apartment units, with a rooftop pool at the highest level. These market rate units will vary between 1,262 and 1,430 square feet in size. The building’s articulated facades frame large loggias that connect to interior spaces (either the living room or bedrooms, depending on unit type) and frame views of the nearby Hollywood Hills and Verdugo Mountains. A thick, Schindlerian band of write stucco zig-zags across the North facades. Floor-to-ceiling efficiency glazing wraps around the East and West exposures. Located in the commercially-zoned Burbank Media District, Screenland Lofts is atypical of apartment projects going up in LA area: it's organized as a singular volume. “We wanted to relocate and redefine high-rise housing for L.A.,” firm founder Roger Ferris told AN recently over telephone. He cited the “urbanesque” nature of a tower design as one of the selling points of the scheme. Ferris remarked further that the development would be the only one of its kind an area defined mostly by mid-rise office towers. And indeed, with gentrification making its way from the northernmost reaches of Downtown LA across nearby Highland Park, Atwater Village, and Glendale, Burbank officials are smart to begin densifying their city’s housing stock now.
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Copper Mesh Facade signals renewal in historic town center

"The copper woven mesh opens like a curtain over the city. It unfolds like a filter in front of a fully glazed facade. It shows off the facility while protecting it."

ARC.AME Urban Architects have designed a new School of Art in the center of Calais, a northern port city in France. Recently the town has been notable for a growing refugee population which has attempted to migrate to England by means of the Eurotunnel transit tunnel beneath the English Channel and ferries. The architects say this project exists as a symbol of the revival of the city center: “the powerful and original architecture of the project had to respect the balance and the scales of the context into which it was embedded.” The school program was designed to be fully public, allowing for freely accessible galleries. A secondary residential program provides 25 apartments, placed like houses on the rooftop.  The units are designed as duplexes, each with a south facing terrace. A central courtyard links these residences with the university program. The architects say one of the major challenges at stake in the revitalization of historic city centers, which have been abandoned for the suburbs, is the new lifestyle that a dense mixed-use environment creates.
  • Facade Manufacturer GKD France
  • Architects ARC.AME Urban Architects, DPLG and associate
  • Facade Installer Rabot Dutilleul Construction (General Enterprise)
  • Facade Consultants INGEROP Engineers, Babylone (Landscaper)
  • Location Calais, France
  • Date of Completion 2015
  • System reinforced concrete frame with copper gold varnished mesh screen and extensive vegetated roof gardens
  • Products GKD/Spirale Escale (mesh facade); KME/Tecu Gold (copper roof)
With adjacent buildings literally tied into an existing commercial mall building on the site, demolition was a challenging aspect to the project. The new structure is coordinated to the massing heights of the contextual buildings, however it strongly varies in materiality.  A woven copper mesh product from GKD France screens a facade composed primarily of glazing, and formally opens up onto the city as a curtain. The mesh filters daylight, protecting art galleries and equipment from direct exposure. The coloration of the mesh incorporates a high gloss paint to protect the material from its coastal environment. The roof is detailed in a lacquered copper, subtly – nearly invisibly – transitioning to the metal mesh product which rolls over the facade walls. Several mesh configurations were tested to achieve desired lighting results for classroom and studio spaces. The radial section profile allows the product to be incorporated onto the facade as a single piece, without any splicing required. The architects say one of the greatest successes of the project is the qualities this solar shade provides: “We love many aspects of this project; the mesh, the concrete matrix, the central garden, the exhibition hall…but the thing that lived up most to our expectations is the quality of the light which diffuses all across the building and the visual transparencies between the several indoor spaces.”
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New renderings revealed for Kava Massih Architects' 472 unit, mixed-use development in L.A.'s new Arts District

There’s a fresh set of renderings for an under-construction, mixed-use development in the new and upcoming Arts District (AD) in downtown Los Angeles (or DTLA). L.A., like other west coast cities such as Portland, Oregon's Pearl District or Seattle's Georgetown is now converting defunct warehouses into galleries, exhibition areas, restaurants, and living spaces. In L.A., the 400,000-square-foot housing and retail development is set to include 472 units—studio, one, and two-bedroom loft and flat style apartments. "[T]he development has been in the works for a few years, but recent designs for the project drew criticism from locals, who deemed it monolithic and worried about its car-focused layout," reported Curbed Los Angeles. "In response, parking was reduced from 922 spots down to 744 and a public walking path (which appears to be featured in the renderings) was inserted to connect Third Street to Traction Avenue." There are seven apartment buildings, some five stories high, and others six stories, oriented around a courtyard featuring a dog park and swimming pool, among other amenities. A "social club" features a library, lounge, and stalactite chandelier to illuminate the double-height space. Upper story walkways will connect the buildings together. Of the 400,000 square feet, 22,000 square feet will become retail planned at ground level. Berkeley, C.A.–based Kava Massih Architects is designing the project with local L.A. interior design firm House of Honey. The project reportedly costs $215 million. Phase one completion (a little over half of the units) is slated for December 2017.
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Stealthy Parisian development blends city life with garden courtyards

VIB Architecture has constructed a mixed-use program of student housing and a nursery along a narrow site in a busy neighborhood in Paris.

In a Parisian neighborhood known for its pedestrian-scale passages and small alleys, VIB Architecture has constructed a mixed-use project skillfully incorporating student housing and a nursery program into a complex of several new construction and renovated properties. The project is located in Belleville, a historically working class neighborhood with strong arts community and a heterogeneous mix of architectural scales arranged along a hilly topography. This latest addition to the neighborhood adds to the mix by combining contextual strategies with a bold contemporary material palette and massing scheme. The project is generally organized around two 8-story buildings that are bisected by an exterior passageway that leads to a courtyard space. Apartments are located along the active street front, protecting a rear sunny courtyard, lined with smaller scale buildings, for use by the nursery. An existing building links the two programs.
  • Facade Manufacturer Tolartois (panel fabrication); Francano (anodized finish)
  • Architects VIB Architecture (Franck Vialet and Bettina Ballus)
  • Facade Installer BECS (engineering consultants) / Lainé Delau (facade installation)
  • Facade Consultants Igrec Ingénierie (engineering)
  • Location Paris 20e
  • Date of Completion 2015
  • System rainscreen (perforated, stamped, arched, boards over a galvanized steel framing)
  • Products 2mm aluminum panels (Tolartois); bronze anodizing (Francano); marble granulate coated facades (Zolgranit); Lacquered aluminum frames with integrated acoustic ventilation slits (Kawneer), Laminated and coated flat glass & metal mesh (Jakob)
The most recognizable building is wrapped in a custom-designed perforated aluminum skin, with a massing composed of slightly staggered floor plates with rounded corners. The skin of the building becomes panelized into operable shutters at window locations, allowing for users to control desired levels of shading, privacy and ventilation. The horizontal patterning of the perforations tracks downward into the courtyard, aesthetically integrating the housing and nursery programs, says Franck Vialet, Partner of VIB Architecture. “The perforations give depth and the horizontal stripes vibrate and link the street to the inner gardens.” The building interestingly was originally designed with a wooden rainscreen system, but was dropped early in the design process due to strict fire regulations. Vialet says the resulting aluminum facade became a natural choice due to its material qualities and design flexibility with fabrication processes. “We looked for a skin that could be unique and could be textured or machined into both large scale and smaller pieces. Anodized aluminum was the ideal solution because of its great ability to reflect light and to be perforated easily.” Positioned next to an historic garden, the bronze anodized building acts as a landmark, providing a sense of depth to the urban fabric of Belleville. Immediately adjacent to this building sits a second which is designed to be compatible with existing context, clad in a white plastic coating, the massing of the building is more ubiquitous than the first, while strategically stepping down at the rear facade to gently meet the courtyard. By altering the tectonics of the two buildings, the overall impact of the scale of the project is reduced while reinforcing a central circulation “spine” through the length of the plot, linking two successive courtyards. Vialet says the most successful part of the project is the urbanism it fosters: “its ability to naturally blend into the city and to bring together people from the street, the park, and the courtyards.”
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Goettsch and Lead 8 win competition for massive Shanghai complex

Designs by Chicago-based Goettsch Partners, along with Hong Kong-based Lead 8, have been chosen for a 2,841,672-square-foot, mixed-use complex in Shanghai. The Financial Street Shanghai Railway Station Mixed-Use Development is spread across two parcels of land just north of the Shanghai Rail Station. The project provides pedestrian routes connecting the project to adjacent sites and public transportation hubs with above and below grade paths and bridges. David Buffonge, cofounder and executive director of Lead 8 explained that “Financial Street Shanghai creates a sustainable urban environment that will concentrate walkable, compact densities around a vibrant mixed-use site near Shanghai Railway Station.” On the eastern parcel of the project, a 161,459-square-foot office building is accompanied by 484,375 square feet of loft apartments, and 161,458 square feet of retail space. The western parcel includes 1,410,072 square feet of office space, another 581,251 square feet of retail,236,806 square feet of loft apartment space, and a 53,819-square-foot cultural center. These programs are spread through five main buildings surrounded by shared public spaces and green retail streets. The office buildings also connect with the outdoors with indoor-outdoor work spaces, specifically tailored to appeal to technology and start-up companies. Both Goettsch and Lead 8 worked on the master plan for the project. Goettsch is leading the design on all the office and residential portions of the western parcel and the exterior design of the eastern parcel, while Lead 8 is handling all of the retail portions. Lead 8 is a young office founded in 2014. Their name, a partial acronym, stands for living environments, architecture and design. With offices in Hong Kong, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur, they focus on large-scale, mixed-use, and transit-oriented developments.        
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Right on trend, the oldest mall in America is reborn as micro-apartments

Search Twitter for #mallmonday and see a hilariously bleak photo series that profiles different malls, some dead, some impossibly sad, each week. Why are these depressing spaces so popular with architects? By giving new life to these huge, redundant spaces, architects tap into ruinophilia to feed a culturally ingrained desire for dramatic transformation and also temper the excesses of capitalism, maybe. In the Texas capital, Austin Community College annexed semi-vacant Highland Mall for a new campus, while NBBJ is reviving a dead mall in downtown Columbus. In Providence, Rhode Island, Northeast Collaborative Architects (NCA) handily combined dead mall revivification with micro-apartments, for an timely transformation of downtown's Arcade Providence, the oldest shopping mall in the United States. The 1828 Greek Revival–style mall was closed for the last three years. Designed by Russell Warren and James Bucklin, the three-story mall was America's first enclosed shopping arcade. In a $7 million renovation, Providence-based NCA turned the mall, a National Historic Landmark, into a mixed-use development with 17 retail stores on the ground floor and 48 micro-apartments on top. Apartments open out onto a shared walkway, an arrangement that would be penitentiary-chic if not for a skylit atrium. Unlike micro-apartments in New York, where market-rate rents at Carmel Place range from $2,540 to $2,910 per month, rents at Arcade Providence begin at $550 per month for a 225 to 450 square-foot one-bedroom, My Modern Met reports. (Two- and three-bedroom units are also available.) Those units come with a full bathroom, kitchenette, and a built-in bed with storage. Tenants have access to shared laundry, TV room, and game room, as well as bike storage, and parking. Right now, the only catch for prospective tenants is the 4,000 person waiting list.
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Philly's University City to undergo a ground-up rethink by Ayers Saint Gross, ZGF, and OLIN

In West Philadelphia, a team of developers, planners, and architects are asking one of urbanists' favorite questions: How can a mega-development be made to feel like a neighborhood, and not a bland corporate campus plopped in the middle of the city? Lead developers Wexford Science + Technology and the University City Science Center are spearheading the from-scratch transformation of a former superblock into a sort of mini city within a city. The developers' suggested new name for University City, uCitySquare, is bland, The Philadelphia Inquirer's Inga Saffron contends, though the master plans may not be. Ayers Saint Gross took the lead on the plan, with Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang as a contributor. It appears that the project is riding the same trends that developers used to remake Philly's 12th and Market area into a successful mixed-use district. The uCitySquare master plan would break the 14-acre site into four pieces by restoring 37th and Cuthbert streets, demapped in the urban renewal that transformed the once-dense neighborhood of row houses into growth space for the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel. It suggests moving 37th Street east of its original location, to make traffic and pedestrian flow smoother along the north-south access between Penn and the residential neighborhood of Powelton Village. Stubby Cuthbert Street would be extended east-west, linking Presbyterian Hospital to the Drexel campus. So far, the uses of two of the four parcels have been set. Drexel commissioned Rogers Partners to build an elementary and a middle school. Project start dates are contingent on budget negotiations with the city's school district. The first buildings are sprouting. ZGF Architects' 3675 Market will break ground this spring. The bulky glass cube's main tenant is the Cambridge Innovation Center. The Baltimore-based firm is doing a second building at 37th and Warren with solar panels embedded into the facade. Erdy McHenry will design a mid-rise apartment building with ground-floor retail on Lancaster Avenue that breaks ground this summer. The developers are committed to making common spaces not boring. The University City Science Center says that there will be a supermarket, wide sidewalks, and underground parking to minimize street space devoted to cars. The master plan calls for Philadelphia-based OLIN to design a public park at the center of the site. So far, these are good promises that are tempered by the science center's present foray into urbanism: folding chairs and brick pavers along a pedestrian-only stretch of 37th Street that will connect to uCitySquare is intensely uninviting.
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Architects take cues from industrial landscape painting to transform Raleigh's Warehouse District

Raleigh, North Carolina's diminutive Warehouse District is getting a big newcomer. Durham, North Carolina–based Duda Paine Architects has released renderings for a 17-story, mixed-use development on the current site of a three story warehouse. With land costs rising in the six-square-block area, Duda Paine decided to scale up. The complex, across the street from the Contemporary Art Museum (CAM), will be more than three times taller than its neighbors. In conversation with The News & Observer, project architect and Duda Paine partner Turan Duda explained that the firm has a "philosophy of placemaking." The design takes cues from Colin Rowe's Collage City and the paintings of Charles Sheeler. The building's variegated massing and sharp planes do somewhat evoke the geometries of the latter. Sheeler applied a pastoral eye to industrial technology; it would be interesting to see how he would have depicted the five-story-tall multimedia wall, mounted on the building's south side, that will advertise CAM events and exhibitions. The tower leans back from the street, so as to not overwhelm its neighbors. The ground level incorporates the warehouse structure, allowing brick-clad street frontage to blend in with neighboring warehouses. Steel beams from parts of the demolished warehouse will be used to cover the vestibule and a 40-by-60-foot pocket park. Ten floors of office space will sit atop a seven-story parking deck. A ninth floor lobby will accommodate a restaurant, with views of the city. On the 13th through 17th floors, a "sky window" will offer views of the city from the southern side of the building.
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ODA brings mallcore to Brooklyn with this stacked mixed-use development

Master box-stacking architecture firm ODA has unveiled its latest addition to the Brooklyn cityscape: an eight story, mixed-used development at 71 White Street in East Williamsburg. The approximately 80,700-square-foot hotel, retail, and semi-public space will rise from the skeleton of an existing one-story, graffiti-adorned 1930s warehouse. Calling 71 White Street a mall would undermine the grittiness it strives so hard to project. Yet, its circulation pattern and its relationship to the street speaks for itself. The complex's stacked and rotated layers recede from, yet tower over, the existing low-slung street wall to create a series of insular private and public spaces. The main entrance, on the corner of McKibben and White streets, is set deep into the lot, drawing visitors though indoor and outdoor corridors to access food, drink, and entertainment. The first two floors are programmed for restaurant and retail space. Ground-floor windows would punctuate the now window-deficient facade, and create visual interest on the street. The top five floors are given over to a 112 room hotel. That hotel will provide de facto amenities: gym, rooftop bar, and pool. In addition, renderings depict multiple, expansive shared terraces that afford views of Manhattan. For those interested in people-watching, the third floor will be an open-air public promenade. To access the third floor space from the main entrance, a set of stairs slopes gently upward and diverges, giving access to the east and west ends of the structure. The circulation pattern will accommodate a range of uses: on the west end, an amphitheater slopes down to the ground floor, while the east end appears to be reserved for more quiet activities, like eating at picnic tables.
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Mark it Six: Zaha Hadid unveils another skyscraper in Australia, this time in Melbourne

Zaha Hadid is designing another skyscraper in Australia. Following designs for a trio of towers in Brisbane and a pair of towers in Gold Coast, the London-based architect has just submitted plans for another tower, this time in Melbourne. Like the Brisbane and Gold Coast towers, the proposed project, a 54-story mixed-use skyscraper, also employs a sculptural, tapered expression, creating more open space at the base. Despite the notion that Melbourne is reaching an oversupply of residential housing units, the tower will comprise 420 apartments, 118,000 square feet of retail space, and 60,000 square feet of commercial office space. “If more residential units are not supplied to meet demand, prices will simply become too expensive,” Zaha Hadid Architects Director Gianluca Racana told Australia’s Financial Review. Other features of the project include a public ground-level plaza as well as a new north-south laneway connecting Collins Street, where the tower will be located, with adjacent Francis Street. Due to recent height and density restrictions for the Central Business District set forth by Minister of Planning Richard Wynne, the development of Hadid’s newest Australian tower was delayed. Plans for the project underwent significant height reduction to comply with the new rules, which have been criticized by developers since they were announced this past September. Even with the alterations to its design, the project’s plot ratio is still beyond the maximum requirement allowed under the new law. The developer is hoping that the project’s proposed contributions to the public realm, including the public plaza and the new thoroughfare, will prove exceptional when plans are sent to the minister for approval.
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TEN Arquitectos tapped to design a new mixed-use luxury development in the Cayman Islands

Mexico City– and New York–based architecture firm TEN Arquitectos has been tapped to design a new mixed-use luxury hotel in the Cayman Islands. The $250 million project’s developer, Beach Bay Land Ltd, announced the selection this week at Art Basel. The project, which will be located in St. James Point, Grand Cayman, will feature a 200-room hotel with more than 90 residential units, high-end retail, restaurants, and, of course, spaces for water sports activities. According to the developer, it will create “a unique experience with service levels unprecedented within the region.” Sensitivity to the existing tropical environment will be an important component of the design scheme. As described by the architect, the mixed-use resort will integrate architecture “in harmony with nature while offering the highest standard of luxury accommodation.” “Providing more integrated environments for living and travel, without their losing connection to nature or sense of place, is key to the success of a project like this,” said Enrique Norten of TEN, in a statement. “We have a unique concept here that will fit harmoniously within the landscape.” The development will “provide everything necessary for St. James Point to compete successfully,” Cayman Tourism Minister Moses Kirkconnell told the Caribbean Journal. Slated to open in Fall 2018, the project represents TEN Arquitecto’s first in the Caribbean. The firm’s latest project, CENTRO, a cross-disciplinary university focused on the creative fields, opened this past October in Mexico City. Another recent TEN project includes the Mercedes House, one of the new luxury rental additions to Manhattan's Midtown West. Enrique Norten, who founded TEN in 1986, was also this year’s recipient of the Richard Neutra Award for Professional Excellence, joining the ranks of renowned architects Samuel Mockbee, Thom Mayne, and Tadao Ando.
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Developers get smart on the eventual redo of D.C.'s Brutalist J. Edgar Hoover Building

A long-standing fortress of state secrecy is under siege. The federal government is selling Washington, D.C.'s J. Edgar Hoover Building to a developer who, citizens hope, will turn the FBI's headquarters into a mixed use development. Designed by Charles F. Murphy and completed in 1975, the 2.8 million square foot Brutalist building is praised and reviled for all the reasons Brutalist buildings are praised and reviled. Despite its historical significance and because of $80 million in deferred maintenance, the building will likely be replaced with development that creates a more pedestrian-friendly streetscape. There are, however, massive bureaucratic hurdles to clear before the property can be developed. First, the congressionally-approved 1974 master plan must be revised s0 the site can be developed as a non-office building. However, the Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation, the entity that created the plan, folded in 1996. Its responsibilities are now shared by the National Park Service, the General Services Administration (GSA), and National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC). The three agencies must agree on every step of the plan for it to move forward. When and if these master plan revisions are approved, the agencies can develop design guidelines for the site. The design guidelines must be adopted before developers can bid on the property because of a particular arrangement the federal government requires of this site. The GSA, the federal office responsible for securing land for a new complex, must offload underperforming assets (like the J. Edgar Hoover Building) before acquiring new ones. The developer will take a risk in buying this property because the exchange must occur before what can be built on the property is absolutely final. Finally, the developer's plans will go though the city's design review boards. Developers willing to endure a potentially Kafka-esque wait will be rewarded with prime land on the capital's most prestigious avenue.