Posts tagged with "Mixed-Use":

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BREAKING: BIG unveils gridded, concrete complex for L.A.’s Arts District

Copenhagen and New York City—based Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has unveiled plans for a new, L-shaped mixed-use project in L.A.’s aggressively-gentrifying Arts District. The project, first reported by the L.A. Times and called 670 Mesquit, is planned to contain 800,000 square feet of office space, 250 residential units, and two specialty hotels. The project is being developed by Vella Group and will aim to inject an element of public outdoor space into the previously-industrial neighborhood by proposing a large-scale deck connecting the site with the Los Angeles River. The proposed structures and the river are currently separated from one another by a depressed railway interchange along the longest edge of the site. BIG’s proposal is organized within a gridded concrete superstructure running in three directions. Each bay of the superstructure measures 45 feet on each side and contains elements of programming that are intended to be customized by the final tenants as either housing or office space. The size of the frame will allow these users to have a say in how the spaces within are filled in, whether with interior mezzanine levels or fully-built out levels. Certain bays in the development are left open and will act as public passageways aimed at connecting the ground floor retail areas with the proposed river-bound walkway, L.A. River, and surrounding neighborhood. When these passages occur in the project, according to renderings released by the firm, they cut through an entire bay each time, effectively creating three separate buildings strung together by the concrete armature. The resulting masses step either out or in, depending on the tower block, forming ziggurat-or Breuer-inspired massings. The development will contain 41 affordable units, roughly 16-percent of the overall total, with the rest being priced at market-rate. The development marks BIG’s first commission in Los Angeles and is one of a recent crop of California-located schemes that include offices for Google in Northern California with Thomas Heatherwick and a mixed-use complex in San Francisco.
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NYU reveals design for major mixed-use student and faculty complex

New York University released renderings yesterday of the new Davis Brody Bond and KieranTimberlake–designed 23-story building (dubbed 181 Mercer) on the corner of Houston and Mercer streets, where the Cole Sports Center once stood. Bordering I.M. Pei’s University Village, the tessellated glass building will be 735,000 square feet and includes plans for 58 new classrooms, 50 practice rooms, 20 music instruction rooms, a 350-seat proscenium theater, 10 multi-use rooms for the performing arts, an orchestral ensemble room (the university’s first), and housing for approximately 420 freshmen students and at least 30 faculty. This will make it NYU’s largest classroom building. Additionally, it will include common areas, such as an athletic facility with a lap pool, basketball courts, and other fitness areas that collectively will serve as the new hub of the NYU sports facilities. Both firms have worked on collegiate campuses such as Columbia University, University of Pennsylvania, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and Cornell as well as many others, and wanted this building to be a visual departure from the Cole Sports Center, which was described as opaque and monolithic. The architects opted to only use 80 percent of the permitted square footage to create a sense of permeability and keep the structure open to the public. Greene Street will be extended as a pedestrian walkway between the building and the University Village to create an open feel on campus. Fostering a sense of lightness and transparency was key to the design, which incorporates green roofs, glass panels, outdoor terraces, and common areas and pushes circulation spaces to the perimeter. The project has been in the works since plans were filed and approved by City Council in 2012. Construction is set to begin February 2017 and will be completed in 2021. The projected cost is $1.b million.
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Arquitectonica to design new $1 billion “Innovation District” in Miami

Developer Tony Cho and investor Bob Zangrillo, the CEOs of Dragon Global and Metro 1 respectively, aim to transform the neighborhood of Little Haiti in Miami. Working with Miami studio Arquitectonica, the pair proposes that areas between Northeast 60th and 64th streets to the south and north, and Northeast Second Avenue and a railroad line to the west and east, be developed (in phases) as a gargantuan mixed-use project. 170,000 square feet of the site's former industrial spaces will be repurposed to include an innovation center for start-ups and businesses. According to the Miami Herald, Cho and Zangrillo hope to bring entrepreneurs to the $1 billion campus and keep them there, offering housing and spaces to both work and play. “We are investing money, cleaning things up, bringing more street lights and security in the neighborhood; we’re bringing in art, creating jobs,” Cho said. “I see Miami melding as an urban node. These are all becoming very interesting neighborhoods.” Phase one of the "Innovation District" will see the construction of a sculpture garden, a 30,000-square-foot "Magic City Studios," and the innovation center. The latter will span 15,000 square feet and be part of the "Factory," which will also feature an amphitheater for events. Despite the wealth of square footage available, none will be allocated to parking, furthering the walkable and pedestrian friendly campus feel of the development. Instead, small apartments will negate the need for what Cho calls a “behemoth garage space” that would take up valuable land and only drive up the cost of housing. Speaking in the Wall Street Journal, Cho added that ride-hailing apps would plug the transport gap. The Herald, meanwhile, also reports that listed tenants so far include Salty Donut, Aqua Elements, Photopia, Baby Cotton, ICA (Institute of Contemporary Art), Wynwood Shipping, and Etnia Barcelona.
Phase one is so far penned for 2018 and will be privately financed. The Zangrillo and Cho also mentioned that office and retail space, affordable workforce housing, including micro-units, and even a boutique hotel could possibly come in the future.
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Building-sized mural will cover the latest L.A. Arts District development

Downtown Los Angeles—based Togawa Smith Martin Architects has revealed renderings for a new mural-clad, 12-story multi-family housing tower in L.A.’s Arts District. The project, Arts District Center, would contain 129 live-work condominiums, an 113-room “art hotel,” and 70,000 square feet of retail space along the ground floor. The project will include a public “art plaza” at the corner of Fifth and Seaton Streets and include a 10,000-square foot of art gallery and event space plus a 3,000-square foot artist-collaborative space known as “CoLab” meant to incubate aspiring designers and artists. Renderings shown on the firm’s website and the Arts District Center's website depict a rectilinear tower set atop a double-height, brick-clad retail podium with the public art atrium anchoring the building’s commercial spaces to the street at the corner. The tower is set back from the street line in order to accommodate a terrace at the base of the housing component that overlooks the street. The building features neat rows of punched window openings and is clad on at least two sides by an architectural screen wrapped in large-scale murals. The eastern portion of the building is clad in floor-to-ceiling expanses of multi-colored glass and features projecting floorplates. Renderings also depict a large porte-cochère as well as a rooftop terrace. The Arts District Center is the latest in a long line of multi-family residential and mixed-use projects for the booming area on the eastern edge of Downtown Los Angeles and follows high-profile projects like the 6AM project by Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron and a slew of more modestly-scaled proposals like Studio One Eleven’s 2110 Bay development. For more information on Arts District Center, see the project's website.
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Gensler designs a new vision for the unloved Milwaukee Post Office

The long, low-slung Milwaukee Post Office is not a popular building. The rust-covered Brutalist structure sits along a five-block stretch of the Menominee Riverfront, a place that, until recently, was generally seen as the undesirable backside of the city. But that is all quickly changing. Just east of the post office, the Third Ward neighborhood has been completely transformed in the last ten years. The Menominee River Valley to the west is also seeing new life after over 100 years of being the city’s industrial heart. Now, Chicago-based developers R2, in collaboration with Gensler, are betting on a brighter future for the much-maligned post office.

When R2 bought the building and the surrounding land for $13 million in 2015, it knew it was going to be a long-term project. The United States Postal Service has a lease for its space through 2020, with the option to sign for up to 30 years. Even if the Postal Service were to vacate, the site would always have active train lines running under the building, between its massive concrete piloti. But that is not stopping R2 from planning ahead.

R2 and Gensler recently released new renderings and an outline of their plans for the site. Gensler’s designs call for a major mixed-use development that incorporates office space, residential, and entertainment, as well as small and big-box retail. The site benefits from extensive access to transportation, including ramps from the adjacent elevated freeway, the Milwaukee Intermodal Station, the city’s main Amtrak and Greyhound station, and the now under-construction city streetcar.

“The concerns that are on the site, that in the past have be seen as barriers to development, are now seen as potential drivers for the project,” explained Benjy Ward, Gensler principal and regional design leader. “The market has flipped. The elevated highway that runs by the site and the river have become assets.”

Along with renovating the current building, the project could include two large towers at each end of the site. The east tower would have 282,000 square feet of residential space, while the west tower (along with space in the existing building) would account for nearly one million square feet of office space. The 1,500 feet of riverfront would also be developed as a public promenade and an extension of the city’s growing Riverwalk. Restaurants will line the promenade, and kayak launches and boat docks will connect the project with river traffic. A foot bridge is proposed to connect the existing building to the James Biber–designed Harley Davidson Museum across the river.

Though the Postal Service will remain a tenant in the building for at least the next few years, Gensler’s plans are such that, if given the go-ahead, the project could begin. By working in the currently open land around the building, much of the proposal could be realized without disrupting normal operations.

If realized, the post office project will be one of many changing the face of downtown Milwaukee. Of those projects rising just north of the site, few are as ambitious in scale or program. Yet with at least three years to go before the site could be completely free of its current tenant, the city is going to have to wait a bit for delivery.

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Plans for “Fig & 8th Tower” in downtown Los Angeles revived

Plans to begin construction have been filed by architects Johnson Fain and developers Mitsui Fudosan America for the newest proposed high-rise tower set to rise in downtown Los Angeles. The so-called 8th & Fig tower is to be located at the heart of the city’s downtown financial district, an area that has seen a boom in high-rise construction over the last few years, including the Wilshire Grand Hotel tower, now the city’s tallest tower and highest building west of the Mississippi River, as well as several other adaptive reuse projects and the addition of a new Whole Foods market. The 42-story tower is set to contain 436 residential units that will rise out of a four-story podium containing 10,000-square feet of commercial space along the ground floor as well as an eight-level, 479-stall parking garage with four subterranean parking decks. Renderings depicting the glass-clad tower feature striated facades on all sides with each level’s floor plate protruding slightly from the building’s envelope. The podium level will feature amenities like a pool deck as well as what appears to be a series of landscaped, park-like areas. The project comes as Johnson Fain breaks ground on work across the region, with a new mixed-use, 355-unit, mixed-income pedestrian housing complex moving forward in the nearby Chinatown area and the firm’s ongoing renovations to Phillip Johnson’s Crystal Cathedral also moving forward this year. Plans filed with the city detail a March 2018 construction start date, with the project team aiming to open for occupancy the building sometime in 2020.
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Killefer Flammang Architects and MGA Entertainment team up for 24-acre mixed use campus in the San Fernando Valley

Bratz Doll manufacturer MGA Entertainment and Santa Monica—based Killefer Flammang Architects (KFA) are breaking ground today on a new 24-acre mixed use campus headquarters for the toy- and electronics-maker in the Chatsworth neighborhood of the San Fernando Valley. Dubbed "24" by Uncommon, the real estate company developing the project, the design calls for the adaptive reuse and expansion of an existing industrial structure. (Formerly, it was a Los Angeles Times printing facility.) The developers aim to create approximately 255,000 square feet of office space in the reused building. MGA will move its headquarters from nearby Van Nuys to the new facility and will concentrate development of its wares on-site. KFA’s master plan for 24 features several mixed-use housing blocks containing 660 apartments on land that is currently being used for parking. The apartments will be located above storefronts, with the complex also containing urban amenities like gym facilities, a pair of swimming pool areas, and a park for recreational sports. The complex will also contain a pre-school, community garden areas, and an amphitheater. Regarding the expansion, chief executive of MGA recently told the Los Angeles Times, “The new facility will be a state-of-the-art facility for people to create and work and live and play.” A rendering released by the developers shows the reused printing facility located at the center of the site surrounded by multiple clusters of five- to seven-story apartment courtyard blocks. Surrounding city streets flow into and out of the complex, with internal pedestrian areas generally separated from automobile traffic. The project, which will also feature a transit plaza that will connect to the nearby Orange Line bus rapid transit line and Chatsworth Metrolink commuter rail station, is bounded on its southern edge by a creek that feeds into the Los Angeles river. The project comes as sections of the low-rise industrial and suburban western San Fernando Valley begin to densify and coalesce around new pedestrian-oriented urban centers. Another recently-announced development includes the Westfield Promenade 2035 by Westfield Corporation, Johnson Fain, Togawa Smith Martin Architects, and HKS Architects. 24 will be built in phases with the adaptive reuse component coming by 2018 and the housing component gradually phased-in between 2018 and 2022.
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Gehry Partners’ 8150 Sunset unanimously approved by L.A. City Council

After much political wrangling and the promise of several key changes to the project, Gehry and Partners’ $300-million mixed-use project, 8150 Sunset, has been approved by the Los Angeles City Council, taking the controversial project one step closer toward beginning construction. Designs for 8150 Sunset, which was originally designed to add 249-units of market rate housing, 37 units of affordable housing, and 65,000 square feet of retail space to the Sunset Strip, were originally approved by the Los Angeles City Planning Commission back in August. The project features a cluster of five buildings grouped around public open spaces with commercial areas along the ground floor and a 15-story tower marking the northwestern corner of the site. The L.A. City Council’s approval comes a week after the project cleared the city’s Planning and Land Use Management Committee in a five-hour long meeting that included community input, as well as an in-person testimonial by architect Frank Gehry in support of the project. At that meeting, local Councilperson David Ryu dogged the project for its height, density, and paltry affordable housing component while also citing worries among community members that the project, as proposed, would badly increase traffic in the area. The meeting resulted in developers Townscape Partners agreeing to shorten the tower to 178-feet in height, increase the overall affordable housing allotment slightly, and provide an additional $2 million in funding for traffic mitigation measures. At the meeting, Ryu highlighted the project’s passage as the result of healthy compromise, stating, “8150 Sunset Blvd. is a much better project today” because of the agreed upon changes. Although developers Townscape Partners and the architect have wrestled with neighborhood and City Council opposition for months, the question of whether—and how—to save the historically significant Lytton Savings Bank building currently occupying the site is still an open question. Designed by Kurt Meyer in 1960, the late-modernist bank building is capped by a distinctive folded concrete roof plane and was recently approved as a city historic-cultural landmark in September. Back then, Adrian Scott-Fine, director of advocacy for the Los Angeles Conservancy, told The Architect’s Newspaper that the Gehry project—as presented—would “unnecessarily demolish a historic cultural monument,” adding “there's a very clear way for this project to move forward and preserve this bank building.” Consideration of the historic building’s future will be taken up by the City Council in November, when it will be decided whether to save the building or not and if so, whether to incorporate the structure into Gehry’s scheme or simply relocate the relic to a different site.
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Seattle overtakes New York City and Los Angeles in list ranking construction cranes

A recently-released report by construction and building consulting agency Rider Levett Bucknall has determined that for 2016, Seattle has surpassed New York City and Los Angeles as the city with the highest concentration of construction cranes in operation. The Pacific Northwest city is currently experiencing an unparalleled construction boom: In addition to high-rise, mixed-use construction projects going up across the area, a new neighborhood of high-rise skyscrapers is sprouting up adjacent to the new, NBBJ-designed headquarters for online retailer Amazon. More to the point, according to the report, Seattle has 58 construction cranes in operation. That’s more than New York City and San Francisco combined, which have 28 and 24 cranes each, respectively. This total more double Chicago's count (26 cranes) and is 18 cranes higher than the second-highest city in ranking, Los Angeles (40 cranes). The report also sheds light on the expanding scope of large-scale construction projects dotting the West Coast. Seattle’s booming Denny Triangle neighborhood, the aforementioned Amazon-adjacent condo-town, and various other downtown developments are leading a city-wide push for new construction. In San Francisco, the Transbay Center and Salesforce Tower complexes, as well as the surrounding and also-booming South of Market neighborhood, are raising the skyline higher. And in Los Angeles, luxury developments like the Metropolis, Oceanwide Plaza, and Wilshire Grand Hotel projects, each of which will ultimately cost more than $1 billion to build, are throwing up cranes there. The report also lists 22 cranes dotting the skyline of Portland, Oregon, a city with a comparatively lower skyline populated by a higher number of the mid-rise, seven-story and up structures that require cranes for construction. According to the report, Seattle has seen a 43-percent increase in crane counts since this time last year, led by the commercial, mixed-use, and residential market sectors. One unknown from the rapid pace of construction, however, is if the overall increase in development will have a noticeable impact on housing prices across the region, which from San Diego to San Francisco and Portland to Seattle remaining stubbornly high.
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Brooks + Scarpa unveils designs for new Southern California Flower Market in Los Angeles

Los Angeles–based architects Brooks + Scarpa has revealed plans for the large-scale redevelopment of the 107-year-old Southern California Flower Market in Downtown Los Angeles. The proposal aims to replace the two existing industrial structures on a 3.8-acre site at 755 Wall Street with a mixed-use, podium-and-tower complex. The proposed redevelopment would consist of a low-rise podium tower that will house mercantile facilities for the existing flower vendors along the ground floor, with between 50,000 and 60,000 square feet of office space and stacked parking above, while a second building on the site will consist of a 14-story apartment tower. That tower would include 290 apartments plus an undisclosed number of affordable units and would overlook a solar panel-topped amenity level meant for use by building residents. Preliminary renderings released for the project show a colorful, gridded tower rising out of the podium, with two of the tower’s exposures clad in what partner Angela Brooks described to Los Angeles Downtown News as flower-themed murals. Brooks went on to explain some of the inspiration for the project, telling the publication, “It's the idea of using the flower. It's going to be very modern in its design, but we’re trying to honor the Flower Market through the art.” The Flower Market was originally founded in 1909 by Japanese-American flower growers in a nearby area and moved to its current location in 1923. The Flower Mart is still owned by the descendants of that original group of owners and the proposed redevelopment scheme is part of a regional effort to preserve Los Angeles’s industrial and mercantile functions and heritage while accommodating a new and furious spurt of urban growth. The recently-revealed 6AM project by Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron has similar conceptual underpinnings, with a housing tower and mercantile areas sharing the same site. The project aims to break ground in 2018.
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A coterie of artificial islands and high-rises planned to rise near Istanbul

Fourteen miles west of Istanbul’s Atatürk airport on the coast of the Sea of Marmara, a pearl looks set to rise out of the water. Designed by Chicago firm Forum Studio, the mixed-use development covers 1,660,000 square feet, offering close to 1,500 residential units and a 500 boat marina.

The marina comprises a circular array of artificial islands. “The architectural concept derived both its form and defining character from the natural environment of the Marmara Sea coast,” said Erik Andersen, design principal at Forum Studio. “The islands are conceived as an alternative to a utilitarian seawall; they harmonize with, and extend, the region’s natural landscape.”

A “pearlescent” node that projects colored light beams into the air acts a visual focal point and hub in the center of the arrangement. The marina will also include an innovative botanical garden and a Marmara Sea research center that, according to Andersen, will “enrich the community with opportunities for research and learning.”

Low-rise volumes and a host of landscaping features make up the majority of the marina, facilitating undisturbed views out to sea for those living in the high-rise dwellings on the natural shoreline. “Changes in scale—from the monumental to the intimate—accommodate a variety of uses that will include nightlife and entertainment as well as family-friendly activities and academic marine research facilities,” said Andersen.

Andersen explained that a careful study of the ecology of the shoreline context “informed and inspired many landscape and sustainable design strategies.” The “dense,” pedestrian-friendly community is “organized around a network of landscapes that utilize native plants and natural stormwater systems for collection and reuse.” Andersen elaborated on Forum Studio’s approach: “We studied the project as a series of interconnected systems similar to a living organism. Each system informs and supports the other. The intent was to optimize performance in the way nature does with every living organism and every natural ecosystem.”

Currently, the project is going through initial municipal approvals for the land development. The schedule for groundbreaking is yet to be determined.

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A 1,000-foot gradient tower of stainless steel and glass

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A nearly 1,000-foot, mixed-use tower was recently completed in Guangzhou, the third largest Chinese city behind Beijing and Shanghai, about 75 miles northwest of Hong Kong. This is the third project that Chinese-based R&F Properties has developed with Chicago-based architect Goettsch Partners. The building, named R&F Yingkai Square, benefits from a masterplan that is almost fully realized—to date— and involves planned gardens, cultural space, museums, and mixed-use towers. Paul De Santis, principal of Goettsch Partners, said the Pearl River area of Guangzhou was envisioned 15 to 20 years ago, and is nearly complete today. “In China, the context often changes too rapidly to formally respond, but the government was very committed to this particular master plan. It gave us an opportunity to be contextually sensitive."
  • Facade Manufacturer Sanxin Facade Technology Ltd.
  • Architects Goettsch Partners, Guangzhou Residential Architectural Design Institute (Associate Architect)
  • Facade Installer Sanxin Facade Technology Ltd.
  • Facade Consultants R&F Properties Development Co. (structural engineer); Arup (MEP Engineer); BPI (Lighting designer)
  • Location Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
  • Date of Completion 2014
  • System reinforced concrete with curtain wall
  • Products Linen finish Stainless steel panels by Rimex; Akzo Nobel (architectural coatings); CSG (tower low-e glass and lobby low-iron glass)
Angular canted corner walls break up the massing of the otherwise boxy tower, providing specific views out into the city. While the northwest corner provides good views 250 feet above neighboring buildings, the northeast corner is best viewed only 100-feet high. This led to a “syncopation,” as De Santis called it, in the location of the 8- to 10-story chamfered corners. He said other view corridors into the cityscape can improve or get worse depending on height. "We use the corner carves to not only architecturally call out the mixed use stacking of the building but also highlight those signature moments." A nearly 14-foot-high reinforced concrete floor-to-floor spacing accommodates a 10-foot clear ceiling. The exterior wall is a unitized curtain wall system. Operable ventilation for occupant comfort is incorporated into the system. The glass is an insulated low-e assembly with an aluminum mullion system. A lot of energy was put into the detailing of the corner units, which are also unitized, but consist of three layers of laminated fritted glazing for added structural and aesthetic benefits. To address both daytime and nighttime lighting conditions, the frit is two-sided: white on the outside, dark on the inside. At nighttime, the glass can be "grazed" by LED's which allows for the building to be illuminated to the exterior without introducing light to the interior space. During the day, the dark frit from the interior is nearly imperceptible when looking outward to the exterior. A gradient of panelized stainless steel panels tapers into the curtain wall glazing. The architects say this composition is an expression of the gravitational quality of the tower and a response to the stacked program of the building. By utilizing opaque panels at the base of the tower, the shell of the building is responsive to a connective infrastructure of bridges and tunnels tapping into the building to support retail use. With office and hotel uses above, the panels give way to transparent view glass. The bulk of the building is dedicated to office use, organized into four zones. Situated within the office is a "sky lobby" for the office users. The Park Hyatt occupies nine floors above the offices, and the tower is capped off with hotel amenities such as a pool, lobby, lounges, three restaurants, and an outdoor terrace 300m off the ground. As stainless panels taper in width, their height and vertical spacing remains constant. Horizontal coursings slightly overlap at spandrel panels, which assume a unique, but repetitive, geometry. The composition allows for a more standardized view glass unit on each floor and De Santis assures us on the logic behind the facades panelization: "It looks more complicated visually than it actually is." One primary dimensional restraint was set by the glass manufacturer who limited a panel width to 600 mm, or around 24 inches, due to manufacturing processes. The final massing of the building was designed iteratively by incorporating a rigorous approach to wall modulation, accommodating glass manufacturing dimensional requirements to produce a "final" geometry of chamfered corners. The architects integrated lighting into the facade assembly in response to what they consider a cultural norm in tall Chinese construction projects. De Santis said, “Our number one goal was to try to manage light pollution—a serious issue in the city.” To combat this, the architects located LEDs behind stainless steel panels which cant outward as they taper up the building into thin vertical strips. This provides a subtle indirect lighting element without exposing the source. The architects went with this approach to avoid having to flood light or uplight the tower with harsh lighting. The LED's are programmable and can be syncopated, change colors, and dim to produce effects ranging from static to theatrical. De Santis says the ability of this project to cater to both a pedestrian and urban scale is particularly successful, and a good learning lesson for future tower projects. "The sense of intimacy we were able to achieve for the arrival sequence of the hotel. 300-meter (984-foot) tall towers have a big impact on your surroundings, and to get a level of intimacy means that you are able to incorporate an interesting level of detail and material selections. The feel of the space is anything but cold and austere, which is often the case in large tower buildings." De Santis explains the Hyatt hotel brand prides itself on this level of intimacy. “It's less about grand ballrooms and lobby spaces, and more about producing warmth and a human scale.” This triggered a change of material at the hotel drop off point. A dark anodized steel and Chinese screens in the ceiling pair with a simple natural stone that washes the entire space in a natural, light-toned coloration. This provides a backdrop for sculptural artwork and provides the basis for unique multi-story spaces "carved" into the tower in the upper floor lobby and lounge spaces. De Santis concludes, “Your tower can have an expression. You can create an intimate environment without losing the expression of its urban gesture."