Posts tagged with "MIT":

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MIT Launches New Multidisciplinary Initiative

With a $1.5 million Mellon Foundation grant in hand, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is establishing a Center for Art, Science and Technology (CAST), which will advance integrated arts education in higher learning. The proposal was co-sponsored by the associate provost and the deans of the schools of Architecture and Planning and Humanities,  Arts, and Social Sciences. The grant will provide funds for faculty, researchers, and curators to develop multidisciplinary programs that traverse art, science, and technology. It will also support the University's Visiting Artists program. “MIT has a great legacy in this domain,” Architecture Dean Adele Naude Santos said in a statement. “MIT created the first architecture program in the country and is today a leader in new forms of design and digital fabrication; the Center for Advanced Visual Studies, founded by György Kepes in 1967, established a model for collaborations among artists, scientists and engineers; and the Media Lab is internationally renowned for pioneering efforts in the fields of design, media arts and electronic music.”
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Quick Clicks> Tiny Homes, Artificial Leaf, Sky Nets, Shrouded Silos

Tiny Homes. The average size of an American home has been decreasing since 2009 (to at 2,392 SF), the Wall Street Journal reported. With financial and environmental concerns, many homeowners are down-sizing. The book Nano House: Innovations for Small Dwellings examines dwellings under 800 feet, such as the above 215-square-foot house in Belgium. Artificial Leaf. Researchers at MIT have created an artificial leaf that uses sunlight to convert water into oxygen and hydrogen. The device is made of silicon, that is coated with a cobalt catalyst on one side, and a nickel catalyst on the other. When dropped in water, the cobalt separates oxygen and the nickel side hydrogen. The next step: scientists are working on a way to capture the gasses. More at Inhabitat. Sky Sculptures. Brookline, Massachusetts artist Janet Echelman uses Indian fisherman weaving techniques to create ethereal neon nets that float in urban sky-scapes. Check out images of her work, that resembles the translucent fish of the coral reef at Artist a Day. Shrouded Silos. In Omaha, Nebraska, the educational nonprofit Emerging Terrain has wrapped grain silo elevators in giant 80 by 20 feet banners that focus on food and agricultural issues. More at Planetizen.
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Quick Clicks> Bird Troubles, Liters of Light, Road to Africa, Parc de Paris

Migration melee. Migratory birds continue to fall victim to the glass facades comprising invisible and impenetrable forest of buildings in New York City. Bird advocacy groups and planning and building commissions are beginning to take notice. The New York Times investigated this ecologically sensitive dichotomy. Let there be light. MIT students and the MyShelter Foundation, a non-profit aimed at creating sustainable communities, have joined forces to light up the Phillipines. This capable collaboration has created an innovative way to bring light to notoriously dark cities outside of Manila. The result? The Solar Bulb. Core77 explained this simple and ingenious amalgamation of water, sealant, bleach and a plastic bottle. Road to Africa. While perhaps not on the immediate horizon, urban thinkers and This Big City are looking at Africa and its potential for economic development. With all of our hindsight in the world of urban planning, is it any wonder that we do not know where to begin? The photo says it all. Parking Paris. French and Swiss architecture outfits AWP and HHF have collaborated to out-design competitors and take home the privilege of creating all of the infrastructure buildings at Paris' Parc des Bords de Seine. DesignBoom looked at this series of low-cost, modular structures that will bring new residents to the park to eat, play, and watch birds from a second-story platform.
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Quick Clicks> Ando’s Silence, Solar-Jet Printing, Attn:Birds, & Post Post

Ando's Silence. According to Dezeen, UK developer Grosvenor has partnered with the Westminster City Council on a project to open public space in Mayfair, London. The project aims to reduce unnecessary visual elements like signage and expand pedestrian areas. Architect Tadao Ando collaborated with firm Blair Associates to design Silence, an installation that intermittently produces fiber-optically illuminated vapor rising from the bases of trees. Power Plant Printer. MIT News has revealed an exciting new technology: printable solar cells. According to MIT: "The basic process is essentially the same as the one used to make the silvery lining in your bag of potato chips: a vapor-deposition process that can be carried out inexpensively on a vast commercial scale." So, not quite as easy as, say, printing out a power station on your inkjet, but still able to revolutionize the future of solar installations. Building for Birds. The City of San Francisco is making an example of a new California Academy of Science building. It's design for the birds. The San Francisco Chronicle notes the building's innovative fabric screen deterring bird-on-building collisions could be applied to other structures in the city. "Bird-safe design" is a growing part of the conversation, but the question remains: will altering the transparency of urban glass structures detract from the design intent? Déjà vu Design. Does that new building look strangely familiar? A new website called Post Post bills itself as the "comparative architecture index." By juxtaposing projects of similar design languages or forms, the site hopes to "to illuminate the interwoven and complex relationships of congruous trajectories within contemporary architectural practice." Have a look!
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MIT Lights It Up For Big 150

If you’re in Cambridge this weekend and you’re looking for a good time, head to MIT. That’s probably not what people usually say about a place where sleep is a treasured commodity, but the school is celebrating its 150th anniversary in a big way with a weekend of playful installations that light up the Charles River. The campus and the riverfront will be open to the public for over 20 interactive projects to mark the end of the Festival of Art+Science+Technology. The interactive projects, which showcase energy, light and media, promise to be grand in scope and creative in nature. Among them are: Light Drift, a display of ninety brightly glowing orbs in the river that change color as people sit on corresponding orbs along the shore; SOFT rockers (shown above), solar charging stations disguised as outdoor rocking lounge furniture; and Liquid Archive, a floating screen that will show the original artists’ proposals for the 1972 Charles River project. The weekend, which was curated by Professor Meejin Yoon (Principal of Howeler + Yoon Architecture and MY Studio), will feature work by MIT Department of Architecture Head, Nader Tehrani (founder and principal of Office d’A and of the newly formed NADAAA), Professor Sheila Kennedy (Principal of Kennedy Violich Architecture), and Yoon herself. Yoon originally created Light Drift for the Mural Arts Program in Philadelphia last year.

That Settles It

MIT reached a settlement with Frank Gehry last month for what had been called a flawed, leaky design for his Ray and Maria Stata Center that led to a 2007 lawsuit, which also named construction manager Skanska as responsible. Blair Kamin revealed the news Tuesday on his Cityscapes blog, but he didn't reveal much as the settlement remains private. Drawing on an MIT student newspaper story from March 19, Kamin notes,
"MIT retained outside consultants to examine the construction for defects, and those consultants produced reports which are not publicly available." The account does not say whether any money changed hands in the settlement. [...] In an email Tuesday, Gehry said no money was involved in the settlement. On March 30, the university's news office issued a joint statement from MIT, Gehry's firm (Gehry Partners) and Skanska saying that the lawsuit had been "amicably resolved."
So there you have it. Legacy preserved.