Posts tagged with "Minimalism":

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Lautner’s Sheats Goldstein Residence has been gifted to LACMA

James Goldstein has donated his landmark house, located on Angelo View Drive, Los Angeles, and designed by prolific West Coast architect John Lautner to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). In addition, the dwellings contents and surrounding estate has also been included in the donation. In Pop-Culture, the house is most widely recognized for its appearance in the film The Big Lebowski. The dwelling commonly known as the Sheats Goldstein Residence includes an "infinity tennis court" (best not to hit it out of bounds), a James Turrell Skyspace, entertainment complex, and an extensive array of landscaped tropical gardens. Included as part of the contents of the house will be architectural models of the house, artistic works, and a 1961 Rolls Royce (pictured below). "Over the course of many meetings with Michael Govan, I was very impressed with his appreciation for the history of the house and the role it has played in the cultural life of Los Angeles, as well as with his vision for continuing that tradition when the house becomes an important part of LACMA's collections," Goldstein said. "Hopefully, my gift will serve as a catalyst to encourage others to do the same to preserve and keep alive Los Angeles’s architectural gems for future generations.” https://vimeo.com/30456390 "Great architecture is as powerful an inspiration as any artwork, and LACMA is honored to care for, maintain, and preserve this house, as well as to enhance access to this great resource for architecture students, scholars, and the public," said LACMA CEO Michael Govan in a press release. "We are excited to collaborate with other arts institutions on events that speak to Jim’s interests and that connect and reach across creative disciplines—architecture, film, fashion, and art." The residence represents the unique relationship Goldstein and Lautner shared for more than three decades. Originally constructed in 1963 for Helen and Paul Sheats, Goldstein purchased the house in 1972 and began working closely with Lautner in 1979. Together they modified the house "according to Lautner’s and Goldstein’s ultimate vision," replacing all the glass to amplify the disparity between indoor and outdoor space. Other alterations saw the introduction of bespoke minimalist concrete seating (the seats we see "The Dude" aka Jeff Bridges sit on in The Big Lebowski), as well as glass and wood furnishings. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShUhcBroF5Y The James Turrell Skyspace, named Above Horizon was added in 2004 and rises above the property's tropical gardens. Above Horizon also links to other works by Turrell in the LACMA domain, such as Ganzfeld Breathing Light, and the Perceptual Cell Light Reignfall.
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Imma let you finish, but Kanye West had the best minimalist Manhattan bachelor pad of all time

The utilitarian Manhattan loft formerly owned by rap mogul Kanye West bespeaks deep pockets and a distaste for cluttering decor. The 1,585 square foot bachelor pad, which West sold in 2013 for $4.5 million, is an ultra-minimalist expanse of French limestone and pear wood—and not much else. Completed in 2007 by illustrious Italian designer Claudio Silvestrin, the one-bedroom loft boasts 12-foot-high ceilings and an open floor plan for “continuous flow of space” with no partitions separating the living area, kitchen, and master suite. Right angles and straight lines reign in the unflinchingly geometric design, the freestanding stone kitchen island aligning perfectly with the refectory-style dining table. The only other monolith of stone to break the monotony is the sculptural bathtub adjoining the master bedroom, which has its own walk-in dressing area. Keeping the stripped-down look from veering into hospital corridor-like severity are hidden light sources at the base of the walls and near the ceiling, while the soft white walls, textured flooring and large windows along two sides of the square loft provide almost-homey touches. As the architect couches it, the spartan design "conveys a feeling of solemnity that is elegant rather than intimidating." West moved into the space in 2008, while it was still under construction, selling the fourth-floor unit on West Houston Street for $4.5 million in 2013. These views of West’s loft include renderings of the celebrity abode along with photos taken by brokers after he had moved out.
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San Francisco Academy of Sciences Adding Pavilion to Piano-Designed Campus

The San Francisco Academy of Sciences has okayed a small new dining pavilion designed by Mark Cavagnero, to sit adjacent to its Renzo Piano-design museum, reports the San Francisco Chronicle's John King. The 12-foot-tall, 1,450 square foot space will be located in a corner of the museum's west garden, replacing an unused aviary. The project is still in conceptual stages, but so far it looks as though it would be rectilinear, lightweight, and glassy, with a large cantilevered flat roof providing shade. Museum guests can bring food out to the pavilion, or just use the space for relaxation. The rather minimal construction should make a good counterpoint to Piano's dynamic, undulating one. "When cultural facilities hire star architects to attract attention and set a new tone, the follow-through is as important as the first-year buzz," pointed out King.
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On View at the Whitney: Scrim veil-Black rectangle-Natural light

This summer, the Whitney Museum of American Art will reinstall a work for the first time since its original conception in 1977. Robert Irwin (b. 1928) formed the large-scale Scrim veil-Black rectangle-Natural light, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, especially for the Emily Fisher Landau Gallery almost four decades ago. The exhibition was central to Irwin’s career, as it determined the path for his ensuing practice, and will now be on display for the second time from June 27 to September 1, 2013. The work accentuates the Whitney’s renowned Breuer building and the natural light that reaches the interior from the single Madison Avenue window. Irwin’s installation involves a partially transparent white scrim weighted down by a black metal bar. The system is suspended from the ceiling and hangs five and a half feet above the floor, spanning 117 feet across the room. A thin black line mirrors the bar and borders the gallery walls. The elements accentuate the setting and sway visitors’ observations of the Museum’s fourth floor. In concurrence with the exhibition, the Whitney will digitize the 1977 exhibition catalogue and make it accessible online. It will contain images, plans, and information assembled by the 1977 exhibition’s curator, Richard Marshall. The updated report will include a new introduction by Whitney Chief Curator Donna De Salvo. Photographs and drawings associated with the display will be located in another fourth-floor gallery. Robert Irwin is a native of Long Beach, California and studied at the Otis Art Institute and the Chouinard Art Institute, where he trained in Abstract Expressionist painting. He was invited to join the Ferus Gallery in 1958, but soon after he began to create new minimalist works. As he fused his creative methods with his interests in science, philosophy, and religion, Irwin conceived that art must be conditional to its environment and must enhance viewers’ perceptions. He deserted the idea of the frame to create art in express response to certain settings. An artist at the forefront of the Light and Space movement, he continues to build site-specific works.