Posts tagged with "Milan":

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Adam Nathaniel Furman designs hyper-vibrant furniture installation for Milan Design Week 2017

London-based Adam Nathaniel Furman once described a project of his as "eye gougingly colorful." The work in question was a conceptual reaction to the monolithic concrete Corviale housing scheme in Rome. A designer, critic, and champion of postmodernism, Furman has now designed four equally colorful works with an Italian inflection. This time, however, no eye gouging is necessary. Furman was commissioned by Camp Design Gallery for the Milan Design Week/Fuori Salone 2017 to create this new installation, titled 4 Characters in the First Act and curated by Marco Sammicheli. It comprises furniture described by Furman as "bursting with personality." The four pieces are all named. Introducing: Angiolo (aside unit); Anselmo (a table); Annibale (a cupboard with legs); and Augusto (a triangle cupboard). Drawing inspiration from Italy, and what Furman describes as "its incredible ability to always mix, and synthesize, influences from all around the world," the highly decorative pieces draw from Korean, Balian, Thai, and Chinese imagery. Furman continued, noting how the styles he draws upon have been "updated with a bright, glowing, and joyful 21st century aesthetic." The four A's (Angiolo, Anselmo, Annibale, and Augusto) have been made with traditional Italian craft, using hand-made Lombard timber carpentry and painted steel. "Imagine a Thai business lady, and an Italian backpacker, spending a long, exciting, passion and drug-fuelled night together in a Chinese club," said Furman. "Well these pieces are the embodiment of this kind of wonderful, sensual and aesthetic trans-continental exchange." "In an age of increasing isolationism and gloom, this is a collection that picks up on Marco Polo's legacy, and is the celebratory, colorful expression of a desire to travel, and to meet and make exciting, strange new things," he added.
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Herzog & de Meuron's Feltrinelli Foundation opens in Milan

Herzog & de Meuron's Fondazione Feltrinelli has opened up in the Porta Volta district of Milan on the via Pasubio avenue. The foundation is primarily a center for historical sciences, political, economic, and social research. Herzog & de Meuron's building will serve as the publisher's head office, being used for teaching, reading, meeting, and administrative purposes. Microsoft is also due to take up residency in February next year. On the outside, the project features bicycle and pedestrian paths along with a concrete courtyard sparsely populated with benches and trees. Concrete continues to dominate the space, being used in grid fashion for the building's structure—the glass facade is interrupted only by mullions and concrete floor plates. Subsequently, the interior has plenty of access to daylight ensuring adequate illumination. While differing in material from its 20th-century neighbors, the building references the surrounding historical vernacular through simplistic geometries and repetitive patterns on its facade. Inside, meeting rooms, classrooms, office space, and an extensive library and reading room can be found along with typical amenities including a cafe and reception area. The building will feature furniture from Unifor and bespoke designs from Herzog & de Meuron who worked with Italian furniture company Coima Image.
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Salone del Mobile Highlights

As usual, Milan Design Week was a whirlwind as architects, designers, dealers, journalists, and PR firms descended to the most storied furniture brands pavilions at Salone del Mobile and showrooms across the city. Here are a few highlights from the week:

Salone del Mobile Rho Fiera

The main event, particularly for the trade, spans over two million square meters and is housed in building by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas. Thousands of pavilions were carefully crafted to attract furniture buyers, dealers, and press for the 55th Salone del Mobile. The larger brands have teams who spend up to a year designing pavilions, which have to be assembled in a week. Some impressive pavilions this year included Cassina’s recreation of the Rietveld Pavillion built in Holland in the 1955. Also impressive was Kartell’s “Talking Minds,” where each designer had his or her own “room” with video interviews playing on loop explaining the inspiration and methodology behind the designs, Arper’s carefully curated color stories, and Dedon’s verdant “Jungalow.” Cosentino’s creative rooms around the world by Canadian studio Ciccone Simone, complete with a full cafe serving up drinks and charcuterie. Salone Satellite was another must-see for the AN team, see our write up on it here. Also, don't miss our trend-spotting article on the Salone's chromatic glass.

Spazio Orlandi

A must-see for all, Rossana Orlandi’s gallery features a wide range of up-and-coming and independent designers from around the globe. This year, Spazio Orlandi was accompanied by Marta Di Bibendum next door where AirBnB and Ambra Medda hosted the extremely popular Makers and Bakers event. The entire café was furnished with the designs for people to use as they ate in the café. Norwegian Gallerie S.e. also hosted a minimal space with luxurious furniture in rich metals and velvet. Incredible designers such as Maarten BaasPiet Hein Eek, Yukiko Nagai, Alcarol, and Nika Zupanc.

Triennale

Set in Milan’s Sempione park, this year’s XXI Triennale theme "21st Century: Design After Design" was interpreted into exhibits such as Stanze (Rooms), Architecture as Art, Neo Preistoria, La Metropoli Multietnica, and more. We particularly enjoyed the Stanze at the Triennale musem, where visitors walked through a series of rooms designed by notable figures—Gio Ponti, Franco Albini, Carlo Mollino, Carlo Scarpa, Carlo De Carli, Vittoriano Viganò, Ettore Sottsass, Joe Colombo, etc—as well as newer architects, such as Andrea Anastasio, Fabio Novembre, Duilio Forte, Elisabetta Terragni, Carlo Ratti, and Francesco Librizzi. The focus was on Milan’s reputation as having architecture with plain exteriors and stunning interiors.

Atelier Clerici

Set in the stunning, hyper-elaborate rococo Clerici palazzo, young designers presented forward-thinking designs and concepts. RAM House by PROKOSS + Space Caviar offered a place to sit in the courtyard.

Inside the space, Aldo Bakker’s amorphous video installation Pause offered a preview of his upcoming retrospective at CID Grand-Hornu. SapienStone’s Smart Slab is an integrated cooktop design with technology that allows almost quarter-inch-thick stone to be heated, cooled, or transformed into a stovetop by touching the interactive surface. Textile brand Buro Belen used natural dyes that slowly change over time, reacting to touch, sun, and wear to show how materials interact with their users.

To learn more about some of the designers we saw at Atelier Clerci, don’t miss our upcoming May Interiors issue!

Valcucine at Brera Design District, Salone del Mobile 2016 from Architect's Newspaper on Vimeo.

Brera Design District

A sprawling neighborhood of showrooms for both furniture and fashion houses, a few Brera highlights included the incredible HAY market, a gymnasium with maze-like rooms packed out with the company’s wares. Hem presented a series of ice cream socials to celebrate Max Lamb’s new “Last Stool Splatter” collection. In addition there were works by Philippe Malouin, Karoline Fesser, and Studio DeFORM. The showrooms by Valcucine, DePadova, Boffi, Miele, Agape, Cappellini, Fantini, and more, opened their doors to display new designs and offer cocktails each night.

The Hotel Wallpaper in the Via San Gregorio arcade displayed collaborations among architects and designers to create a “hotel” with a bar, bedroom, bathroom, lounge area, and even a mini golf course created with thick Bolon fabric (a sponsor of the exhibit).

Via Tortona

Part block party, part exhibition space, Via Tortona hosted the SuperDesign Show and a gamut of events featuring designs by major brands and designers, such as Marcel Wanders, Naoto Fukasawa, and Maarten Baas.

The SuperDesign Show, 10,000 square meters of space, chose the theme White Pages, that according to the press release, “implies writing together the world waiting for us tomorrow…. An invitation to exhibit not only ready-to-use objects and proposals but also futuristic and experimental projects and to ‘narrate’ them to the public with words and installations in an ideal ‘white page.’”

COS X Fujimoto Forest of Light

Clothing and company COS collaborated with Sou Fujimoto for this room filled with fog, cones of light, and custom-made noises.

Spazio Lambrate

Located in a former gym in the north east Section of Milan, Spazio Lambrate features designers such as Roberto Negri, Arredi Siamo Scarti, Agostino Favarelli, and Laura Daza. It is part of a burgeoning creative district in Milan and we predict it will continue to be an important part of future saloni.

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Milan hops on the car-banning bandwagon with its own proposal to create zones of "pedestrian privilege"

Milan is the latest city to join the ranks of Paris, Madrid, Brussels, and Dublin in expelling cars from its smoggy, often gridlocked city center. Unlike its more zealous counterparts, the city has opted for an incremental approach, with no proposed timeline and a gradual, virtually street by street implementation. Despite taking things slow, deputy mayor Lucia di Cesaris stressed that the plan will amount to no less than a “soft revolution.” Earlier this month, she announced the pedestrianization of the Piazza della Scala, the grand square on which the Scala Opera House is located. Purging the square of vehicles will extend to the north the existing pedestrian zone in Milan’s heart, consisting of the Cathedral Square and the area around the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, the adjacent shopping arcade. After the Piazza della Scala joins up with this zone, the car-free area will extend into the streets beyond the square. Pedestrianization of this area, a hub for arts and culture venues, is a welcome move to transform it into a thriving, open-air promenade. Over on the city center’s southern edge, Navigli, one of Milan’s most romantic neighborhoods, is expanding its pedestrian area, creating a car-free bar and café quarter to add to the just-pedestrianized Piazza Missori nearby. Ultimately, the objective is what the deputy mayor calls “the creation of a vast area of pedestrian privilege.” Long beset by pollution problems, Milan has experimented with an array of schemes—from banning traffic altogether for 10 hours on a Sunday in February 2004 when smog levels exceeded the statutory maximum, to paying commuters to leave their cars at home and use public transportation. A coalition of Milanese companies sends drivers vouchers worth $1.87 (the average daily cost for using public transportation) for each day their vehicles stay in their driveways between the hours of 7:30am and 7:30pm. Dedicated “black boxes” installed behind vehicle dashboards track the car’s whereabouts to verify compliance. According to Inrix, a traffic information provider, Milan has the worst traffic of any city in Europe, and one of the highest pollution levels in the continent.
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Pictorial> Twenty-one of the best pavilions from Milan Expo 2015

Milano Expo 2015 is rolling along, with 145 countries and a host of international organizations, civil society organizations, and corporations displaying their food-centric traditions and the latest sustainable agriculture and food production techniques. AN reported on the Expo when it opened:

a handful of designs...stand out as attempts to rethink the way we build and how it relates to modern agriculture and sustainable food production for the next century. Most of the pavilions use sustainable materials and construction methods that utilize national building techniques. Inside, exhibitions—often interactive—showcase biodiversity, culture, and food traditions of each nation.

Beyond the focus on food and agriculture, there is also a wealth of eye-catching architecture at the Milan Expo as well. Here is a collection of some of our favorite pavilions from this year's rendition. And be sure to check out our coverage of the Expo here.
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AC Milan football club soon to call "world's most innovative stadium" home

Italian football giant AC Milan is relocating to what the club purports as “the world’s most innovative stadium” in the city’s Portello area. The new mixed-use facility will be slightly over half the size of the team’s current 80,000-seater San Siro stadium, which it shares with fierce rival Intel. Flagging spectator turnout in recent years has incentivized several Italian football clubs to occupy downsized stadiums. In the 2013-14 season, AC Milan averaged just 40,061 spectators and half-empty bleachers. The club selected a design team consisting of architecture and design firm Arup and Italian architect Emilio Faroldi, who studied 70 stadia around the world as part of the design process, absorbing ideas from the Emirates Stadium in London, the St. Jakob-Park in Basel, and the new San Mames stadium in Bilbao. Given initial protests by Milan residents over the club’s relocation, Faroldi’s onus was to create a minimally invasive design with the aesthetic of a building rather than a hulking sports facility. Thus the first 33 feet of the stadium will be sunken underground, with the building peaking at just 98 feet. Aspiring towards a multi-use stadium that remains operational on non-matchdays like those in the UK, the facility will include a hotel, sports college, restaurants, courtyard and rooftop green areas, a children’s playground, and public art spaces. “Scientific research, through a series of studies, tell us clearly that the role of arenas in Europe and the world is gradually changing,” Faroldi told Italy’s La Gazetta dello Sport. “The stadiums are no longer meant just as a place for sporting events, although open all week, but as a useful piece to reorder the outlook of a neighborhood, a city.” The architect aimed for fewer turnstiles and fewer barriers between fans and the stadium, proposing to supplement these distancing reinforcements with heightened security. AC Milan recently mobilized to tout the benefits of the new stadium to the public, such as escalated land value and the creation of 1,000 jobs during construction and 500 jobs thereafter. The club emphasized the incorporation of state-of-the-art sound-proof materials for near-zero noise pollution and minimal visual impact, as well as the stadium’s integration with public transportation systems. AC Milan hopes to move into its new stadium by the beginning of the 2018–19 Series A season.
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More in Milan: Rem Koolhaas' arts complex for Prada brings together old and new—with gold

Should you be looking for yet another reason to add Milan to your architectural travel itinerary, the Prada Foundation is scheduled to open its many doors to the public on May 9. Designed by Rem Koolhaas/OMA, the campus—part new construction, part rehabbed structures—will include 120,000 square feet of exhibition space, a theater, a children's area, a restaurant, and library. "It is surprising that despite the enormous expansion of art media, the number of typologies for the display of art remains limited," commented Koolhaas on his website. "It seems that art's apotheosis is unfolding in an increasingly limited repertoire of spatial conditions: The gallery (white, abstract, and neutral), the industrial space (attractive because of its predictable conditions which are meant to remain neutral when juxtaposed with any artwork), the contemporary art museum (a barely disguised version of the department store), and the purgatory of the art fair." The Prada Foundation is located in a former distillery at Largo Isarco, an industrial complex dating from 1910 that comprises seven existing buildings, including a warehouse, laboratories, and brewing silos surrounded by a large courtyard. OMA inserted three new structures into the site: a museum for temporary exhibitions, a transformable cinema building, and a ten-story gallery tower. Opening exhibits will draw on the holdings of the Prada Collection (which is heavy on 20th century and contemporary art) and works on loan from museums around the world. Projects commissioned for the occasion are also on the program; Robert Gober and Thomas Demand have created site-specific installations that engage the old and new architectures, and Roman Polanski has produced a documentary film that explores his cinematographic inspirations. [via NY Times.]
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Snarkitecture created this ethereal light-filled cave to calm visitors at Milan Design Week

No, you haven't stepped inside a dream world made of suspended toilet paper tissues. You are, however, inside an ethereal installation crafted by New York–based design studio Snarkitecture and created for the 2015 Salone del Mobile taking place this week in Milan. https://youtu.be/obi38URay-M Principles Daniel Arsham and Alex Mustonen crafted this light-filled, monochromatic "cave" for minimalist fashion brand, COS, collaborating with the brand's in-house creative team. The designers were going for an aesthetic of clean lines and ambiguous spaces, and we'd say they achieved those goals. The subtly swaying gradients created by light filtering through strips of fabric create an incredibly peaceful environment appropriate for clearing one's head after a hectic day at Salone. COS' creative team, headed by Karin Gustafsson and Martin Andersson, chose Snarkitecture for their design approach to "reduction," and the architects' work even influenced COS' Spring and Summer collections. The brand was sympathetic to what Snarkitecture described as "removing anything non-essential and focusing the viewer's experience." And in creating this ethereal cave of light, not even a blouse or pair of trousers can be found on display in the space. "Without the use of our garments, Snarkitecture have perfectly encapsulated the COS aesthetic, creating an installation that is unique in its simplicity and unexpected in its approach," Gustafsson said in a statement. "The final space has a sense of calmness and wonder that we hope visitors will explore and return to," Arsham and Mustonen said in a statement. "The undulating spaces and the shifting quality of light seem to create a different experience with each visit." And while these views show the space in isolated tranquility, the flurry of visitors through the strips will reveal glimpses and continuously change the experience of the cave. The installation is on view at Spazio Erbe in the Brera district through April 19—or for those of us without a press pass to Milan, here in video and photographic form.
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David Chipperfield designs a luxe showroom in Milan for Italian furniture brand Driade

In a rising-from-the-ashes revival, prominent Italian furniture brand Driade will debut a new showroom in Milan under the creative direction of British architect David Chipperfield, the company’s newly appointed artistic director. The opening of the three-story, 5,381-square-foot space marks an existential do-over for the firm, which folded in 2012 with debts of over €1.7 million (nearly US$2 million). At the time, the Italian design industry was notorious for chewing up and spitting out small, family-owned companies like Driade that invested disproportionately in product innovation and lacked the capital to expand or compete in the global market. Having cut a €7 million (nearly US$8 million) investment deal with Italian Creation Group in exchange for 80 percent equity, Driade is set to reboot with a showroom that declares its brand identity—from its iconic pieces to the latest designs. Recalling the brand’s infant years between 1968 and 1982, the first exhibition hallmarks the early vision of founders Enrico Astori, Antonia Astori, and Adelaide Acerbi. Celebrated designs from that period include Tokuyin Yoshioka’s monobloc Tokyo-Pop collection and Philippe Starck’s three-legged Costes cafe chair, which inspired an onslaught of clones and the movement of ordinarily mass-produced necessities like kitchenware, pasta and mineral water becoming designer duds. Partnering with top Italian and eventually world-renowned designers such as Patricia Urquiola and Oscar Tusquets, Driade was conceived with a vision to reconcile experimentation with mass production. Located in Via Borgogna 8, Milan, the showroom moonlights as a shop and a gallery showcasing objects and furnishings curated by Marco Romanelli.
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Product> Kitchens + Baths: The Latest Designs from Europe

At Salon del Mobile, the specialized trade show Eurocucina focuses on innovation in kitchen systems and appliances. This year, trends include a fascination with dark woods and the evolution of wall cabinets from closed boxes to open shelves. On the bathroom front, exhibitors at the Salone del Bagno were promoting unusual finishes and materials for plumbing fixtures and fittings. Valcucine Riciclantica Acciaio Now available with a glass worktop, ultra-thin doors, and a redesigned backsplash panel that facilitates installation around utility lines. Designed by Gabriele Centazzo. Snaidero Ola 25 In Ferrari Red lacquer, this limited-edition design commemorates the quarter-century anniversary of the kitchen manufacturer. Designed by Pininfarina. Scavolini Foodshelf Designed specifically for open-plan residences, the storage is modeled after living room furniture, rather than traditional kitchen cabinets. Designed by Ora-ïto. Leicht Xtend+ Automated louvered cabinet fronts can be raised and lowered via remote control or smartphone. Elmar @home The black walnut cooking island is modeled after a Venetian rowlock. Suspended steel cylinders house ventilation, lighting, and audio speakers. Designed by C+S Architects. Cesar Kalea Aluminum door-frames can be fitted with glass, wood, or ceramic panels in a variety of colors and finishes. Designed by G.V. Plazzogna. Kreoo Gong Available in four marbles, this 32-inch-by-13-inch basin can be installed as a countertop vessel or on a compatible pedestal. Designed by Enzo Berti. Dornbracht MEM in Cyprum Finish This new rose-gold-colored finish is a nuanced interpretation of polished copper; available on select fitting collections for bath and kitchen. MEM was designed by Sieger Design. Rexa Esperanto This component-based system provides flexible design alternatives that can be adapted to baths of different sizes and configurations. Designed by Monica Graffeo. Geberit Monolith A compromise between bulky floor-mounted commodes and in-wall installations, this toilet features a shallow tank that is sheathed in white or black glass. Axor Axor Starck V Fabricated of glass, this bathroom mixer puts hydrodynamics on display, with a swirling vortex created whenever the tap is turned on. Designed by Philippe Starck. Laufen IlBagnoAlessi One  Offered in 35-inch and 47-inch versions, the curves of this console basin complement the strong lines of the walnut vanity cabinet. Designed by Stefano Giovannoni.
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Biber Architects' American Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015 to Honor Food Trucks and Vertical Farming

[beforeafter]03-us-pavilion-milan-expo-2015-biber-architects-archpaper The U.S. Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015. (Courtesy Biber Architects)[/beforeafter]   The United States will celebrate one of its most prized national treasures at the next World’s Fair: the food truck. In honor of the theme of the 2015  Milano Expo—“Feed the Planet, Energy for Life"—the American Pavilion, called American Food 2.0, includes street-level food trucks that will serve up some favorite American dishes. James Biber, the New York City–based architect of the pavilion, told Business Insider, it's not been decided which food trucks will be included at the site, but that there will be lobster rolls "for sure." But the pavilion design doesn't end with food trucks. [beforeafter]05b-us-pavilion-milan-expo-2015-biber-architects-archpaper 05a-us-pavilion-milan-expo-2015-biber-architects-archpaper[/beforeafter]   The pavilion’s most visually distinctive feature, is its hydroponic facade—or, a football-field-length,vertical farm that is planted with harvestable crops. "It is as though a typical horizontal field was rotated (think Inception with a farm field standing in for Paris) to become the side of a building," said Biber Architects in a statement. "It's not our proposal for serious urban or vertical farming, which is usually indoors, but a didactic display talking about the past, present, and future of the American farm, and the American diet." Behind the vertical farm is an airplane hangar-sized door, which opens the structure to the public. A "boardwalk" made of recycled lumber from American boardwalks takes viewers from the first floor to the second. Above that is a roof-top terrace, which is partially covered in a glass shade and photovoltaic panels. Biber told Architectural Record that the masterplan for the Expo, which was partially designed by Herzog & de Meuron, is "the most urban" he's ever seen. Lots at the site are only 20-feet-wide to create a more dense fabric. The Expo opens its doors to the public on May 1, 2015. [beforeafter]The U.S. Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015. (Courtesy Biber Architects) 04a-us-pavilion-milan-expo-2015-biber-architects-archpaper[/beforeafter]
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Zaha Hadid's Boldly Curvaceous Forms and Surfaces from Milan

While much of the work introduced at Milan this year played it safe—distinctly conservative colors, forms familiar from the 1950s, cautious use of materials—some architects' designs took, shall we say, a bolder stance. But: Was it a better one? You, ever-opinionated reader, shall and no doubt will be the judge of that. Among the boldest of the bold designs this year were four pieces presented by Zaha Hadid. Most photos we've seen of the aluminum Manta Ray seating underscore its unfortunate semblance, not to the graceful sea creature, but to a giant human posterior. At AN, we're taking the high road, featuring this more abstracted view of the piece. But it may not be enough to erase the obvious imagery. Here, Hadid has designed a fireplace, which appears to have melted into a puddle of black marble. Ironically cold design, for an interiors element that generates heat. Thumbs up on this one. A rectangular top is a disciplined extension of the vaguely tripod-ish base. Great stone fabrication, and we wouldn't even mind bumping our knees on the legs of this terrific table. A welcome departure from the blobby, yes? But the mid-point of the unit seems to be a bit dysfunctional for shelving, lacking any level horizontal surfaces, but hey, it's all about the cantilever. Looking back on Salone 2014, it's interesting that one can fairly easily discern which pieces were architect-generated versus those that were created by industrial designers. The latter are trained (and paid) to produce commercially viable furniture collections, while the former are free to indulge in the making of domestic monuments.