Posts tagged with "Milan Expo 2015":

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How three pavilions from Expo Milano 2015 will find new life around the globe

Expo Milano 2015, with its theme of “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life,” closed Saturday, October 31st. Although investing $1.8 billion into a 184-day event and transporting designers and materials across the globe isn’t quite sustainable, the results were revolutionary—exhibiting new, sustainable building methods and promoting food production. But now, the big question is: what’s going to happen to these temporary structures? Here are three notable participants repurposing their structures with minimal waste. Palazzo Italia: Becoming a university campus Palazzo Italia, designed by Nemesi & Partners, is clad with 2,204 tons of smog-filtering concrete, eighty percent of which is sourced from recycled materials, like Carrara marble. During the expo, the interior’s interactive spaces promoted Italy’s agricultural and culinary traditions, and now it will serve as the headquarters of a university campus for innovation. Having been repurposed on site, Palazzo Italia will not be disassembled, making it the only permanent structure designed for the Expo. Breathe.Austria: Reforesting South Tyrol Breathe.Austria, “The Breathing Pavilion,” by Team.Breathe.Austria, Terrain, is a miniature Austrian forest, designed to provide around 138 pounds of fresh oxygen per hour, without filters. Climate engineers will release the actual measurements within a week. However, this estimated rate is enough oxygen for 1,800 people in an ideal climate and demonstrates the benefits of a reforestation policy. Now that it’s time to leave the Expo, the reforestation pavilion has to deforest, but the 12 Austrian forest ecotypes—ranging from mosses and shrubs to towering, 40-foot trees—will get a home in a reforestation project in South Tyrol, Italy. Vanke Pavilion: Funding the restoration of a Chinese temple Vanke’s corporate pavilion, by Studio Libeskind, was designed and constructed as a “kit,” making it easy to disassemble and recycle. The 4,000 red metalized tiles, designed by Libeskind and Casalgrande Padana, will be sent to Vanke in China, formed into a piece of art, and auctioned off for charity, funding the restoration of a Chinese temple. The Pavilion’s contractor, Bodino, will reuse and resell the structural and mechanical components. These are only a few examples of how the Milan Expo has set the stage for expos to monitor consumption, minimize waste, and create long-serving structures.
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Pictorial> Twenty-one of the best pavilions from Milan Expo 2015

Milano Expo 2015 is rolling along, with 145 countries and a host of international organizations, civil society organizations, and corporations displaying their food-centric traditions and the latest sustainable agriculture and food production techniques. AN reported on the Expo when it opened:

a handful of designs...stand out as attempts to rethink the way we build and how it relates to modern agriculture and sustainable food production for the next century. Most of the pavilions use sustainable materials and construction methods that utilize national building techniques. Inside, exhibitions—often interactive—showcase biodiversity, culture, and food traditions of each nation.

Beyond the focus on food and agriculture, there is also a wealth of eye-catching architecture at the Milan Expo as well. Here is a collection of some of our favorite pavilions from this year's rendition. And be sure to check out our coverage of the Expo here.
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Biber Architects’ American Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015 to Honor Food Trucks and Vertical Farming

[beforeafter]03-us-pavilion-milan-expo-2015-biber-architects-archpaper The U.S. Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015. (Courtesy Biber Architects)[/beforeafter]   The United States will celebrate one of its most prized national treasures at the next World’s Fair: the food truck. In honor of the theme of the 2015  Milano Expo—“Feed the Planet, Energy for Life"—the American Pavilion, called American Food 2.0, includes street-level food trucks that will serve up some favorite American dishes. James Biber, the New York City–based architect of the pavilion, told Business Insider, it's not been decided which food trucks will be included at the site, but that there will be lobster rolls "for sure." But the pavilion design doesn't end with food trucks. [beforeafter]05b-us-pavilion-milan-expo-2015-biber-architects-archpaper 05a-us-pavilion-milan-expo-2015-biber-architects-archpaper[/beforeafter]   The pavilion’s most visually distinctive feature, is its hydroponic facade—or, a football-field-length,vertical farm that is planted with harvestable crops. "It is as though a typical horizontal field was rotated (think Inception with a farm field standing in for Paris) to become the side of a building," said Biber Architects in a statement. "It's not our proposal for serious urban or vertical farming, which is usually indoors, but a didactic display talking about the past, present, and future of the American farm, and the American diet." Behind the vertical farm is an airplane hangar-sized door, which opens the structure to the public. A "boardwalk" made of recycled lumber from American boardwalks takes viewers from the first floor to the second. Above that is a roof-top terrace, which is partially covered in a glass shade and photovoltaic panels. Biber told Architectural Record that the masterplan for the Expo, which was partially designed by Herzog & de Meuron, is "the most urban" he's ever seen. Lots at the site are only 20-feet-wide to create a more dense fabric. The Expo opens its doors to the public on May 1, 2015. [beforeafter]The U.S. Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015. (Courtesy Biber Architects) 04a-us-pavilion-milan-expo-2015-biber-architects-archpaper[/beforeafter]