Posts tagged with "Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize":

SANAA’s Grace Farms wins Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize

Japanese firm SANAA has been awarded the Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize (MCHAP) for 2014/15 for their Grace Farms project in New Canaan, Connecticut. The MCHAP prize seeks to recognize the "most distinguished architectural works built on the North and South American continents." The founders of SANAA, Kazuko Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, were awarded $50,000 at the prize ceremony yesterday evening at the Illinois Institute of Technology's S. R. Crown Hall in Chicago where Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel was also in attendance as co-chair. The prize money will go toward funding research and publication (the exact subject, of which, seems to-be-determined). SANAA's winning project, Grace Farms, opened in October last year. The building, known as The River, features a ribbon-like, undulating roofscape that meanders through its natural context. With a glass facade on either side and being elevated by stilts, the roof appears to float through its surroundings. The River attracted 50,000 within the first six months of it opening, with visitors taking part in architectural tours, community dinners, lectures and discussions, concerts, athletics, and worship services and just simply exploring the 80-acre site. In addition to Grace Farms, the finalists for MCHAP comprised the following:
  • Weekend House by Angelo Bucci, São Paulo, Brazil
  • UTEC Campus by Grafton Architects, Lima, Peru
  • Pachacamac Museum by Llosa Cortegana, Lima, Peru
  • Tower 41 by Alberto Kalach, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Star Apartments by Michael Maltzan, Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Stan Allen, MCHAP Jury President, said in a press release, "As a jury, we were looking not only for buildings of exceptional quality, but also for buildings that contribute something new to the discipline. We were very impressed by the high quality of the work coming from such a wide variety of cultures. There may be a global architecture culture today, but each place we visited had its own identity and every project responded to a specific context. As a jury we also observed common themes: All of the projects, even those in urban areas, engage with landscape; they all embrace architecture as a force for change; and finally, all of them find a delicate balance between innovation and the history of the discipline." While SANAA took the main prize, Tommy Kyung-Tae Nam and Yun Yun from the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan were announced as winners of the recently established student award. Nam and Yun claimed the Taubman College Burton L. Kampner Memorial Award for their (a)typical office project which was developed with the guidance of Faculty Advisor Adam Fure.

Inaugural Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize goes to cliffside cube in Chile

After traveling all over the Western Hemisphere to inspect built work by emerging architects from Canada to Chile, a team of judges awarded the first-ever Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize on Tuesday, bestowing $25,000 and an offer to teach at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) on Mauricio Pezo and Sofia Von Ellrichshausen for their poetic Poli House, perched above the Pacific Ocean on a cliff in Tomé, Chile. The inaugural MCHAP.emerge prize was directed by Wiel Arets, Dean of the College of Architecture at IIT, and IIT professor / Chicago architect Dirk Denison. Some 265 nominees vied for two prizes, each “recognizing the most distinguished works built in North and South America between January 2000 and December 2013.” The nominees for MCHAP were established designers, while MCHAP.emerge was meant for architects in the early stages of their careers. The later-career architects get their day in the sun October 22,w hen the $50,000 MCHAP award is announced. Four finalists were feted Tuesday at IIT, where they were congratulated by Denison, Arets, Rice University Architecture Dean Sarah Whiting, and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. Pezo von Ellrihshausen, a design firm based in Concepción, Chile, took home the MCHAP.emerge prize for their Poli House—a solid, earthquake-resistant concrete cube whose simple materiality and exterior form belies a series of intricately sculpted interior spaces. Occasional voids in the double-walled concrete perimeter punctuate the building’s rooms and passageways with stunning views of the Pacific Ocean, which rumbles below the cliffside residence and art gallery.   Another Chilean project, the Kiltro House in Talca, similarly celebrated its dramatic setting with floor-to-ceiling glass spaces jutting out over steep drops in elevation. Named for a Chilean crossbreed dog, the Kiltro House took its cues from a mishmash of architectural styles, according to designer Juan Pablo Corvalán. With Gabriel Vergara, he heads Supersudaca architects. A Farnsworth-esque glass box cantilevered from a hybrid of various residential styles—including a castle included for a client who fancied herself a princess, Corvalán said—lifts up a roof whose undulations reflect the underlying topography. Farther north, in Los Angeles, architects Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues won recognition for Maximilian’s Schell, a golden vortex that hovers above a formerly vacant lot in the Silverlake neighborhood. Inspired by the Disney flop "Black Hole" and the minimalist surfaces of architect/engineer Frei Otto, the installation creates “both an intimate experience and a spectacle,” Ball said, by transmitting geometric shadows and yellow-tinged pools of light on the ground beneath the canopy. Look up from beneath the eye of the black hole, as it were, and you get a glimpse of a “James Turrell moment,” Ball said, if the sky cooperates. Still farther north, Winnipeg, Canada’s 5468796 Architecture was asked to reactivate a downtown plaza, whose 1970s bandshell had fallen into disrepair. They went much further than a simple rehab, however, coaxing great versatility from what at first appears to be an illuminated mesh cube. Ringed by a flexible curtain of perforated metal, the cube conceals several possible performance and event spaces, as well as what has become one of the most popular spots for wedding photos in Winnipeg. Projections from inside translate to the exterior, an effect used frequently when the cube’s metal screen is pulled back to frame the stage with an elegance surprising for its metallic heft.