Posts tagged with "Michigan":

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Exhibition on computational design and architecture opens in tandem with ACADIA conference

As part of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) 2016 Conference held at the University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: DATA, DESIGNERS AND COGNITIVE MACHINES will feature work that showcases the methods, processes, and techniques discussed at the conference. The show, held in the 3,000-square-foot Liberty Research Annex Gallery in downtown Ann Arbor, Michigan, will be divided into two sections: A “Juried Projects Exhibition” and a Curated Topic Exhibition.” The juried portion of the show will display work that was part of an open call this past spring, while the curated half of the show will be comprised of video and physical project installations. The work will also be published in a full-color catalogue. The exhibition opening will coincide with the ACADIA 2016 Conference, with an opening reception on October 27 at 7:00 p.m. at the Liberty Research Annex Gallery.

POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: DATA, DESIGNERS AND COGNITIVE MACHINES Liberty Research Annex Gallery 305 West Liberty Street Ann Arbor, Michigan Conference: October 27–29, 2016, Exhibition: October 19–November 4

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Up-and-coming young firms experiment with materials to create a unique gastropub interior

Ann Arbor–based Sift Studio and EADO are two of a handful of young firms experimenting with material, surface, and meaning. With the help of adventurous clients, they have been able to translate their work from research in the shops at Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan into sparkling spaces of tactile experience.

The Marq, a gastropub in Marquette, Michigan, on the northern coast of the Upper Peninsula, is detailed in uncanny materials that blur the line between artificial and natural. The collaboration between EADO and Sift , the Marq is an answer to how theoretical work can play out in real life. The result is a warm, textured space that is at once like nothing else in the small, out-of-the-way town, while still reminiscent of a cozy cabin.

Only steps away from the frigid shores of Lake Superior, the glowing restaurant is a stark contrast to the oft-blowing snow and cold of the Upper Peninsula. Entering through a door at the end of a set-back walkway, one ascends into the main bar and dining space, completing the separation from the elements outside. A more intimate seating area, featuring views over the hilly town, is lofted over the entrance. In this spot, the large custom light fixtures become more apparent. Bare-filament incandescent bulbs amplify the effect of the rich gold paint that covers most of the walls.

A technique dubbed by the team as “textural grafting” was used throughout the project, in which natural materials are de-familiarized through the application of paint, plastics, and resin—not everything is exactly as it seems. This plays out on the walls, bar, and furniture in the form of gold, glitter, and burnt lumber. The walls are patterned through the use of gloss on matte-gold paint. The pattern itself is derived from abstracted photographs of natural materials; this gives the walls a shiny artificial grain, a grafted texture. Nearby, a wooden wall is periodically interrupted by absences of material, an effect produced by the burning and charring of the lumbers’ ends, revealing another underlying gold surface. The wood itself is treated with a finish that gives it a smoothness that plays with the perception of the burnt ends, which are smooth and shiny.

Another step farther in, the long bar to the rear is first perceived as a simple, slick black material. On closer inspection, its materiality is put into question. While it appears as a monolithic mass, the saturated, thick finish produces a false effect of depth or wetness. This effect comes from the base material of wood, blackened by charring; its trick texture comes from a thick layer of resin. Glitter, suspended in the resin, sparkles in the low, luminous light of the space, completing the look.

It is not often that young designers are given such freedom to expand their research into built work. For small firms, though, it’s a necessary step in developing a critical practice that is also economically viable. In the case of the Marq, EADO and Sift were able enact practical investigations in the interest of reclaiming some architectural agency for texture and ornament.

Correction: In the original printing of this article in AN Interior #3, it was stated that Adam Fure and Ellie Abrons were members of Sift Studio. The project was, in fact, a collaboration between Sift, headed by Adam Fure, and EADO, headed by Ellie Abrons, which are separate studios. This article has been edited to reflect that. 

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Kalamazoo completes new, state-of-the-art courthouse

Kalamazoo, Michigan, has a consolidated all its family court functions into one new 81,200-square-foot facility. Designed by New York-based HOK, the Gull Road Family Justice Complex brings together juvenile functions, domestic relations, probate, prosecuting attorneys, clerks and family support services. The new natural light-filled project takes advantage of its site’s steep ridge. A two-story insulated curtain wall lines the buildings the public corridors. Courtrooms, hearing rooms, offices and conference rooms are lit by clerestory windows and borrowed light. Brick facades with punched windows reference the projects surrounding residential community and the neighboring juvenile center. A two-story glass atrium and three-story open staircase bring the public into the building. The complex’s four courtrooms, jury deliberation area, and the prosecuting attorney’s office are on the buildings upper floor. Discrete holding areas and a secure connection to the neighboring juvenile facility are separated from public, judge, and staff areas. The facility integrates the latest in court technology. All courtrooms and hearing rooms are equipped with integrated audio/video recording equipment, video conferencing technology, evidence presentation technology, and sound reinforcement. This system allows for reporters to monitor court proceedings from outside of the courtroom. The lobby also includes monitors outside courtrooms. HOK led programming, planning, and design on the $20.1 million project, with Grand Rapids, Michigan-based TowerPinkster managing the project and serving as architect of record. TowerPinkster also handed mechanical, electrical and plumbing engineering.  Funding for the project came from state revenue and money saved by the circuit court over recent years. The new facility is designed to improve operational efficiency and security, while anticipating future needs of the court system.
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Ford Motor Company has begun a $1.2 billion makeover for its campus in Dearborn, Michigan

When Ford Motor Company took stock of its current 60-year-old Dearborn, Michigan, facilities, it became clear that the only way forward would be to take a big leap into two new high-tech campuses. Spearheading the master plans is the Detroit office of SmithGroupJJR. When completed, the estimated $1.2 billon, ten-year project will involve moving 30,000 employees from 70 buildings into a Product Campus and a Headquarters Campus. Throughout the project, the entire campus will also have to stay 100 percent operational.

One of Ford’s primary goals will be to improve the health and well-being of its employees. To do so, SmithGroupJJR has incorporated the seven concepts of the WELL Building Standard, a matrix that addresses air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort, and mental and emotional health of employees. The 7.5 million square feet of new and remodeled workspace will include ample natural light, diverse workstation configurations, social hubs, and various sizes of collaborative workspaces. These workspaces will add up to one conference room or meeting space for every seven workers. The campus will include walkable paths between buildings, green spaces, cafes, and on-site fitness centers.

“The premise is we are doing buildings that are flexible enough that however they choose to work and collaborate, whether by project team or skill team or a combination of both, that the facility would support different types of organization,” explained SmithGroupJJR principal Carl Roehling, describing how the design was developed with Ford’s changing work model in mind. “We are allowing them to evolve into it and change the way they are working by getting the buildings out of the way of their changing organization.”

Sustainability is also a major concern for Ford, as it sees the campus as a part of its larger push to rethink the company and its products. The design calls for a minimum Silver certification through the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design process as well as LEED Gold certification. A new Sustainability Showcase building on the Product Campus will be net-zero waste, net-zero energy, and net-zero water. Geothermal heating and cooling and solar-power generation mean the building will be able to produce more energy than it uses. As a whole, the campuses will reduce Ford’s energy consumption by 50 percent over its current Dearborn spaces.

Not only will the campus utilize the latest technology to achieve its sustainable goals, the campus itself will be used as a testing ground for Ford’s latest designs and development. In a shift from being a dedicated auto company, Ford has launched the Ford Smart Mobility plan. The plan aims to investigate connectivity, mobility, technology, customer experience, and big data. As part of the investigation, 25 global experiments have been launched, including three in Dearborn. The experiments will include Dearborn employees testing rapid charging and car sharing, big-data collection, and a car-swap program. As Ford’s main research and development facilities, the campuses will also have access to the latest in autonomous vehicles, on-demand shuttles, and eBikes.

At the heart of the Product Campus will be a new 700,000-square-foot Design Center, which will include new design studios and an outdoor design courtyard. The current Design Showroom will be converted into an event space. Construction has already begun on the Product Campus, including the Design Center and the Research and Engineering Center, with a goal of completion in 2023.

The second campus will comprise of the Ford World Headquarters and the Ford Credit facility. With plans to begin in 2021, this campus will maintain the iconic appearance of the current SOM-designed Ford Headquarters from 1956, while renovating 1.3 million square feet of workspace. Employees will also have access to new outdoor recreation facilities, including softball and soccer fields, and a renewed Arjay Miller Arboretum. Other greenspaces will include native plantings and large tree-shaded areas.

Along with Ford’s recently completed Palo Alto campus, the new Dearborn campuses will be the model on which Ford plans to update all of its facilities worldwide. At 199,000 employees and 67 plants spread across the globe, this will be no small task. With these new bold campuses, Ford has shown that its built environment is going to be integral to its next 100 years. 

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Richard Meier house added to National Register of Historic Places

The Richard Meier–designed Douglas House has been added to the National Register of Historic Places. The Harbor Springs, Michigan house was built in 1973 for Mr. and Mrs. James Douglas. Clad in Meier’s signature white, the Douglas House is sited dramatically over Lake Michigan. Due to the steep site, the house is entered from the roof level by way of a foot bridge. This long entry sequence enforces a strict separation between the public and private. Once inside the house is oriented to exterior views. The roof deck and the living room provide uninterrupted views out over Lake Michigan. Richard Meier commented on the early stages of working with the Douglases: “One day I received a letter from a Mr. and Mrs. James Douglas inquiring if I would sell them the blueprints for the Smith House. I replied that while I was not prepared to sell the drawings, I would certainly be willing to design a new house for them along similar lines. They accepted, and I started designing a house for a site that they had purchased in a residential subdivision in northern Michigan. As it happened, the developer who had sponsored the subdivision insisted on reviewing the design of any house that would be built within its boundary. He asked me to submit photographs of my work, whereupon he immediately refused to permit a house designed by me since it did not have the prerequisite classic pitched roof. To my delight, the Douglases responded to this impasse by promptly selling the plot and looking for another site, and that was the beginning of a very gratifying collaboration." The National Register of Historic Places is maintained by the U.S. Department of the Interior via the National Park Service. The goal of the register is to support “public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archaeological resources.”  Properties added to the register can be either buildings, structures, objects, or sites.
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Ford sets its sights on a radical new high-tech Headquarters

This month, Ford motorcar company will break ground on a new complex as part of a major upgrade to its 60-year old Dearborn campus in Michigan. New buildings, located in two campus' designed by Michigan-based architecture firm SmithGroupJJR, will see a fifty-percent reduction in energy consumption, save water, and include a new zero-waste, zero-energy, zero-water Sustainability Showcase building. The move comes as Ford attempts to realign their focus within the rapidly changing automobile industry. “As we transition to an auto and a mobility company, we’re investing in our people and the tools they use to deliver our vision,” said Ford President and CEO Mark Fields. “Bringing our teams together in an open, collaborative environment will make our employees’ lives better, speed decision-making and deliver results for both our core and emerging businesses.” https://youtu.be/VOrHhaEnvEM Of the two new campus' in question, one will be devoted to "products" and the other will act as a headquarters. Together they will comprise 70 buildings for 30,000 employees. Within they ten year time span Ford have set their sights on "more than 7.5 million square feet of work space will be rebuilt and upgraded into even more technology-enabled and connected facilities." Within the campus' a network of walkable community with paths, trails, and covered walkways will connect buildings. On the product campus, autonomous vehicles, on-demand shuttles and eBikes will also be available to use. The showpiece however, will be a new state-of-the-art design center that will boast more than 700,000 square feet of space for design studios as well as an outdoor courtyard for work and socializing. Meanwhile, at the second campus, 1.3 million square feet will be transformed to house the Ford World Headquarters and a Ford Credit facility. All in all, the transformation will see an additional 100 acres of green space and 3.8 million square feet of new buildings. Construction is due to begin this month at the Ford Research and Engineering Center (to become the new product campus), while Ford says that they expect most of the work to be done by 2023. Work on the Ford World Headquarters will begin in 2021, being complete by 2026.
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SOM Chosen to design Detroit’s East Riverfront District

Skidmore Owings & Merrill have been selected by the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy and the City of Detroit Planning Department to develop a comprehensive plan for the city’s East Riverfront District. Early stages of planning will analyze of the area's current building stock, pedestrian and car circulation, and land use patterns. One of the main early concerns is addressing the link between the city and the river front, a mission championed by the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy for the past decade. Along with SOM, six Michigan firms—Birmingham, MI-based McIntosh Poris, Detroit-based Giffels Webster, Kraemer Design Group, AKT Peerless, Southfield, MI-Based Rich & Associates, and West Bloomfield, MI-Based E. Austell Associates—will provide local consulting. Landscape architect Michel Desvigne will also join SOM for the project. Additionally a “Creative Detroit Think Tank” will be set up by Mohsen Mostafavi, dean of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. New York-based HR HR&A Advisors will provide real estate, economic development and energy efficiency expertise to the project. SOM was picked from a field of seven teams which presented initial proposals in late January. Those teams were led by New York-based BJH Advisors, Boston-based STOSS Landscape Urbanism, New York-based Partnership for Architecture and Urbanism (PAU), Chicago-based Gensler, and Boston-based Utile. "The selection process reflects our aspirations for promoting the Detroit waterfront as an international treasure," said Maurice Cox, director of the City of Detroit Planning and Development Department in a press release. "We see no better signal of this than assembling an accomplished team representing local, national and international talent." The first public meeting for East Riverfront District plan will be held on April 12th  from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Outdoor Adventure Center, 1801 Atwater Street, Detroit. “This project is integrally important to the continued evolution of the Detroit Riverfront,” said William Smith, CFO of the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy in a press release. “And, we’re looking forward to hearing what the community has to say. The community feedback we’ve received in the past helped shape what the riverfront is today. What we learn throughout this process now will shape what the riverfront will become in the future.”  
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Mario Carpo and Elizabeth Diller Confirmed as Keynote Speakers for ACADIA 2016

This years ACADIA 2016 conference: Posthuman Frontiers: Data, Designers & Cognitive Machines has announced Mario Carpo (Reyner Banham Professor of Architectural Theory and History, the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL London) and Elizabeth Diller (founding partner of Diller Scofidio + Renfro) as confirmed keynote speakers. In 1999, working alongside Ricardo Scofidio, Ms. Diller was awarded the MacArthur Foundation “genius” award, becoming the first in her filed to do so. Now, Diller will also be receiving the ACADIA 2016 Lifetime Achievement award, an esteemed accolade that represents recognition by colleagues worldwide of consistent contributions and impact on the field of architectural computing and design culture. Co-Founder and Design Partner of Future Cities Lab, San Francisco and recently elected member to the ACADIA Board of Directors and ACADIA President, Jason Kelly Johnson cited how "Diller’s pioneering work at the intersections of architecture, art, technology and philosophy" made her an "ideal" choice as a keynote speaker. Johnson went on to add that "the ACADIA community will celebrate Diller's critical explorations integrating design, computation, and theory into a radically inventive and culturally relevant body of work from installations to buildings to urban landscapes." Mario Carpo was also seen by Johnson as a pivotal speaker for ACADIA 2016. "Carpo's keynote will bring a much needed theoretical and historical perspective to the conference," Johnson noted, going on to say, "His research is a catalyst for critical discussions related to digital design, technology and culture."  Carpo has a strong pedigree in the field of architectural research, focusing on architectural theory, cultural history, and the history of media and information technology. Notable publications include The Alphabet and the AlgorithmThe Digital Turn in Architecture 1992-2012 and his award-winning opus: Architecture in the Age of Printing which has been translated into several languages.

The conference will focus on design work and research carried out in the fields of practice and academia  that relate to "procedural design, designed environments and autonomous machines". More specifically, ACADIA 2016 will concentrate on contemporary trends in computational design that has been used to develop "quasi-cognitive machines" and "integration of software, information, fabrication and sensing to generate mechanisms for interfacing with the physical realm." Papers that touch on relative disciplines such as material science, biology, art, computer graphics, civil engineering, and human-computer interaction have been called to contribute to the discussion.

"Every year the ACADIA conferences bring together a world-class group of designers, architects, engineers, fabricators and thinkers exploring the intersection of computation, digital technologies and architecture," said Johnson. "In North America it has become the event to present, explore and debate emerging ideas in the field."

This years event will be held at the University of Michigan Taubman College in Ann Arbor, Michigan and the conference itself will run from October 27 - 29, 2016.
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IDEAS CITY announces 41 fellows and public programing

IDEAS CITY has announced the names of 41 International Fellows to participate in an Intensive Studio Laboratory Program during the April 25-30 event in Detroit. Selected from over 800 applicants, the Fellows will work in the Herman Kiefer Complex—a former hospital complex in Virginia Park. The five-day charrette will culminate in a day long public program of presentations and talks. The Fellows are made up of emerging practitioners who are working at the intersection of community activism, art, design, and technology. Director of IDEAS CITY Joseph Grima stated in a press release, “IDEAS CITY Detroit will gather forty-one extraordinary individuals to tackle specific challenges facing the city. We’re incredibly excited to have the opportunity to learn from Detroit, to deploy a collective intelligence model based on arts and culture, and to further exchange with the community. The city is in the process of reinventing itself and, once again, is on the verge of transforming our understanding of the modern metropolis. Detroit is a laboratory for a new paradigm of urbanity.” The Fellows named are Joe Ahearn, Taylor Renee Aldridge, Ava Ansari, Hallie Applebaum, Leonardo Aranda, Nick Axel, Merve Bedir, Francesca Berardi, Beverly Chou, Carolyn Concepcion, Gabriela Córdoba, Afaina de Jong, Pınar Demirdağ, Fataah Dihaan, Shaida Ghomashchi, Jon Gray, Kunal Gupta, Tommy Haddock, Jason Hilgefort, Ekene Ijeoma, Tamara Jafar, Stacy’e Jones, Toms Kokins, Cindy Lin, Monty Luke, Daanish Masood, Tiff Massey, Jose R. Mejia, Cara Michell, Marsha Music, Ryan Myers-Johnson, Claire Nowak-Boyd, Evelina Ozola, Paolo Patelli, Margarita Pournara, Jay Rayford, Unai Reglero, Alethea Rockwell, Ruhi Shamim,  Giuditta Vendrame, and Nikolas Ventourakis. The April 30 public event will include the Fellows as well as talks by New York Magazine writer Rembert Browne, Chicago artist Theaster Gates, City of Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs  Commissioner Michelle T. Boone, architect Walter Hood, and artist/architect Amanda Williams, and more. The event will be held at the Jam Handy, a former film studio for car commercials located at 2900 East Grand Boulevard. IDEAS CITY is an international initiative to promote arts and culture as vital parts of healthy future cities. It was co-founded by Lisa Phillips, Toby Devan Lewis Director, and Karen Wong, Deputy Director, the New Museum, and is directed by Joseph Grima.   2016–17 Schedule IDEAS CITY Detroit: April 25–30, 2016 IDEAS CITY Athens: September 19–25, 2016, in partnership with NEON Foundation IDEAS CITY Arles: May 22–27, 2017, presented by the New Museum, LUMA Arles, and LUMA IDEAS CITY New York: Fall 2017   IDEAS CITY Detroit Public Conference Saturday April 30, 2016 The Jam Handy 2900 East Grand Boulevard Detroit, MI 48202   11:15–11:30 AM: Welcome Address by IDEAS CITY, Maurice Cox, and Rembert Browne   11:30 AM–1 PM: Session 1 Opening Keynote by Theaster Gates Talk by Amanda Williams Panel Discussion with Michelle T. Boone, Theaster Gates, Jenny Lee, and Amanda Williams Presentations by Studio Laboratory Fellows   1:30–3 PM: Session 2 Opening Keynote by dream hampton Panel Discussion with Rembert Browne, Halima Cassells, dream hampton, and Sonya S. Mays Presentations by Studio Laboratory Fellows   3:30–7 PM: Session 3 Opening Keynote by Walter Hood Talk by Bryan Boyer Panel Discussion with Kunlé Adeyemi, Bryan Boyer, Ellie Abrons/T+E+A+M, and Walter Hood Presentations by Studio Laboratory Fellows Screening by Liam Young
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On View > Fellow Fellows at Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning

University of Michigan's Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning's Fellow Fellows exhibition, highlighting the work of its 2015-2016 Architecture Fellows, is set to open this Wednesday, March 23.  Over the last year, the fellows spent their time in residence at Taubman developing their research projects while teaching three classes. William Muschenheim Fellow Cyrus Peñarroyo's BLDG_DRWG  challenges both scale and order via hand-crafted imagery, employing tape, ink and paint, and post-creation digital manipulation. His "1:1 investigations" aim to re-establish "existing architectural conditions," the results of which are used to construct a fragment of an unfinished building. Ashley Bigham, the school's Walter B. Sanders Fellow, presents Safety Not Guaranteed, which seeks to represent architecture as synonymous with conflict, war, and defense. In doing so, Bigham also searches to find an alternative to the phrase "defense architecture," which only pertains to "fortresses, citadels, bastions and urban walls."  The project views all architecture through the lens of paranoia, amplifying the sense of fear within the context of suburbia and domestic architecture. Lastly, Willard A. Oberdick Fellow David Eskenazi's For the Trees questions the nature of paper-based architectural modeling. The many creations are merely forms, with no doors or windows to signify they are somehow meant to be a building. They raise questions like: What role do they have? Are they representations, replicas? Are they replicating each other? If so which is copying which? Further questioning inevitably follows: Is the viewer seeing the original, or the copy? Fellow Fellows runs from March 24 through to April 30, 2016.
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Twenty photographs chosen for postcards of Detroit at the U.S. Biennale Pavilion in Venice

As part of the U.S. Pavilion for the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale, 20 photographs by 18 individuals have been chosen as winners of the “My Detroit” Postcard Photo Contest. “The twenty photographs to be printed as postcards will help us tell the exhibition visitor short stories about life in Detroit,” explained co-curator Cynthia Davidson in a press release. The pavilion, entitled The Architectural Imagination, will present 12 speculative architectural projects for four sites around Detroit. The postcards, made from the contest winning photographs, will be available at the pavilion as well as be part of the exhibition catalog. Picked from 463 entries, the images were chosen by photographer and sociologist Camilo José Vergara, who has photographed Detroit since 1985, and Davidson. The images range from views of iconic Detroit architecture, including the Michigan Central Station, to family portraits of local Detroiters. Ten of the contest winners are Detroit residents. "Detroit has a rich culture and history to draw from as we work toward creating a vibrant future," said Robert Fishman, University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning interim dean and professor. "The photos recognized in the postcard contest are a reflection of Detroit over time that we are excited to share with the world." The Architectural Imagination is being organized through the University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture, by co-curators Cynthia Davidson and Monica Ponce de León. The U.S. Pavilion will be open at the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale from May 28 – November 27, 2016. The Postcard Photo contest winners are: Sara Jane Boyers, Santa Monica, CA Derek Chang, New York, NY Jon DeBoer, Royal Oak, MI Antoinette Del Villano, Brooklyn, NY Jennifer Garza-Cuen, Reno, NV Geoff George, Detroit, MI Erik Herrmann, Ann Arbor, MI Julie Huff, Detroit, MI William McGraw, Dearborn, MI Ayana T. Miller, Detroit, MI Ben Nowak, Oak Park, MI Kevin Robishaw, Detroit, MI Salvador Rodriguez, Saint Clair Shores, MI Harrell Scarcello, Southfield, MI Sue Shoemaker, Brown City, MI John Sobczak, Bloomfield, MI Cigdem Talu, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Corine Vermeulen, Hamtramck, MI
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Detroit artist takes legal action to save mural from development

Detroit muralist Katherine Craig (a.k.a. Exactly Hitops) is taking legal action in federal court to protect one of her vanguard works, as the owner the artwork’s building plans for development. Painted in 2009, The Illuminated Mural at 2937 East Grand Boulevard in Detroit’s Milwaukee Junction neighborhood has been an icon of the North End’s burgeoning art scene. The nine-story tall “bleeding rainbow,” as it is often referred, was painted with the support of a Community + Public Art: Detroit grant from the College for Creative Studies. As one might guess, the mural was executed by pouring over 100 gallons of colorful paint down the side of the 125-foot-tall building. In hopes of saving the mural from destruction Craig has filed suit in the U.S. Circuit Court, citing the Visual Artist Rights Act of 1990 (VARA), a federal copyright act specifically passed to protect visual artists, including muralist. This would not be the first time that VARA has been invoked regarding murals being destroyed by building owners. After his six-story tall mural of Ed Ruscha was painted over on a Los Angeles public building in 2006, artist Kent Twitchell sued the federal government, ultimately winning $1.1 million. The potential developer, Princeton Enterprises, a Michigan-based property management and construction firm, bought the building in mid-2015 with plans to sell or develop the site. Located near the College for Creative Studies, the building has recently been used as artist studios, one of which was used by Craig while she completed the mural. The 1913 building was designed by the eminent Detroit industrial architect Albert Kahn, designer of the Packard Motor Car Factory and the multiple factories for Henry Ford, for the Detroit Storage Company. Predating his famed 1928 Fisher Building, 2937 East Grand is an example of Kahn’s early Art Deco style. Interest in the building and the area has grown since the painting of the mural. With the neighboring Midtown booming with new commerce, and the future M-1 Rail passing from the North End to the Downtown, the area is primed for future development. Either way Craig’s lawsuit plays out, it will mean a new precedent for artist-developer relationships as former art communities in urban centers become desirable real estate.