Posts tagged with "Michael Graves":

For the Birds> Michael Graves’ last design for Alessi updated his Bird Kettle with a dragon

The last project Michael Graves completed for Alessi references one of his earliest creations for the company: The 9093 kettle, better known as the Bird Teakettle. To mark the thirtieth anniversary of the iconic piece, the late architect designed a new component for what's being called the Tea Rex kettle. In January 2015, Graves explained the development of this update. "In bird years, thirty is equivalent to Methuselah's life span!" Graves said, describing his new design for the Dragon Whistle. "So when Alberto Alessi asked me to design a new whistle to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of our teakettle, I imagined a new evolution in the history of our kettle. One where our little bird might transform into a super-hero: a reptilian creature that is at once prehistoric, mythological, and futuristic." "I chose the dragon imagery and its jade green color because of the rich cultural heritage found in Chinese folklore that uses the dragon to symbolize power and good luck," Graves said. "Our dragon is friendly and he decidedly does not breathe fire, but perhaps lets off a little steam! He has a smile on his face, an easy-to-hear whistle, and a wing span that makes it easy to remove him from our teakettle when the water boils. We hope our dragon will proudly protect our kettle and your kitchen for years to come." Two versions of Tea Rex are offered: one with a jade green whistle and one—a limited edition of 9,999—with a brass, metallic-finish whistle.

Michael Graves wins Lifetime Achievement Award in 2015 Cooper Hewitt Design Awards

The Cooper Hewitt has announced the winners of its 16th annual National Design Awards. The program was launched in 2000 as part of the White House Millennium Council to "promote design as a vital humanistic tool in shaping the world." First Lady Michelle Obama is serving as the Honorary Patron for the 2015 awards that are accompanied by a series of programs, educational events, and panels. “With the reopening of the museum this past year, Cooper Hewitt is scaling new heights to educate, inspire and empower our community through design,”said Cooper Hewitt director Caroline Baumann in a statement. “I am thrilled and honored to welcome this year’s class of National Design Award winners, all of whom represent the pinnacle of innovation in their field, with their focus on collaboration, social and environmental responsibility, and the fusion of technology and craftsmanship.” This year, the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award was awarded posthumously to Michael Graves, the famous architect and designer who passed away at the age of 80 in March. In a statement, Cooper Hewitt said the renowned postmodernist is credited with "broadening the role of architects and raising public interest in good design as essential to the quality of everyday life." Graves founded his eponymous firm in 1964, and in more recent years had focused on using architecture and design to improve healthcare. Here is a look at the other 2015 Cooper Hewitt Design Awards winners. Director's Award: Jack Lenor Larsen
From Cooper Hewitt: "Jack Lenor Larsen is an internationally renowned textile designer, author and collector, and one of the world’s foremost advocates of traditional and contemporary crafts.
Design Mind: Rosanne Haggerty
From Cooper Hewitt: "For 30 years, Rosanne Haggerty has worked to demonstrate the potential of design to improve the lives of people living in poverty through affordable housing and human services."
Corporate & Institutional Achievement: Heath Ceramics
From Cooper Hewitt: "For more than 60 years, Heath Ceramics has been known for handmade ceramic tableware and architectural tile that embody creativity and craftsmanship, elevate the everyday and enhance the way people eat, live and connect."
Architecture Design: MOS Architects
From Cooper Hewitt: "MOS Architects is a New York-based architecture studio, founded by principals Hilary Sample and Michael Meredith in 2005. ... Recent projects include four studio buildings for the Krabbesholm Højskole campus in Skive, Denmark; the Museum of Outdoor Arts Element House visitor center in Englewood, Colo., the Floating House on Lake Huron, Ontario, Canada, and the Lali Gurans Orphanage and Learning Center in Kathmandu, Nepal."
Communication Design: Project Projects
From Cooper Hewitt: "Founded by Prem Krishnamurthy and Adam Michaels in 2004, Project Projects is a graphic design studio in New York, N.Y., focusing on art, architecture and culture. Combining a rigorously conceptual approach with innovative modes of visual communication, the studio’s work encompasses a wide range of contemporary graphic media."
Fashion Design: threeASFOUR
From Cooper Hewitt: "Recognized as one of the most innovative fashion labels today, threeASFOUR was founded in New York City in 2005 by Gabriel Asfour, Angela Donhauser and Adi Gil, who hail from Lebanon, Tajikistan and Israel, respectively."
Interaction Design: John Underkoffler
From the Cooper Hewitt: "John Underkoffler is a user-interface designer and computer scientist. His work insists that capabilities critical to humans living in a digital world can come only from careful evolution of the human-machine interface."
Interior Design: Commune
From Cooper Hewitt: "Commune is a Los Angeles-based design studio with a reputation for working holistically across the fields of architecture, interior design, graphic design, product design and brand management."
Landscape Architecture:Landscape Architecture: Coen + Partners
From Cooper Hewitt: "Founded by Shane Coen in 1991, Coen + Partners is a renowned landscape architecture practice based in Minneapolis. Through a process of collaboration, experimentation and questioning, the firm’s work embraces the complexities of each site with quiet clarity and ecological integrity."
Product Design: Stephen Burks
From Cooper Hewitt: "For more than a decade, Stephen Burks has dedicated his work to building a bridge between authentic craft traditions, industrial manufacturing and contemporary design."

Obit> Michael Graves passes away at the age of 80

Famed postmodernist architect Michael Graves died of natural causes today at his Princeton, New Jersey home. The architect's passing was announced by the eponymous firm that he founded in 1964. Graves was 80 years old. "For those of us who had the opportunity to work closely with Michael, we knew him as an extraordinary designer, teacher, mentor and friend," said the firm in a statement. "For the countless students that he taught for more than 40 years, Michael was an inspiring professor who encouraged everyone to find their unique design voice. Of all of his accomplishments, Michael often said that, like his own family, his proudest creation was his firm.  As we go forward in our practice, we will continue to honor Michael’s humanistic design philosophy through our commitment to creating unique design solutions that transform people’s lives." Among his highest profile projects were the Portland Building in Oregon and the Humana Building in Louisville, Kentucky. Recently, he had devoted his practice to healthcare design and architecture for people with disabilities. He was also famous for bringing his industrial designs to mass production through his collaboration with Target and later J.C. Penney. Plans for a public memorial in Princeton to honor Graves will be announced soon.

Portland Building, once eyed for demolition, will be saved, Graves says

[Editor's Note: This post was written by Edward Gunts and James Russiello.] The Portland Building, once considered for demolition, will be spared from the wrecking ball and renovated, according to its architect. Michael Graves, the building’s architect, said in late November that city officials have decided to renovate it for continued use as municipal offices and have asked him to serve on a committee that will coordinate the redesign effort. AN spoke to Graves at a symposium organized by the Architectural League of New York. “It’s going to be saved,” Graves said. “They told me… They said they are saving the building and not only that but we want you to sit on a committee for the redesign.” Graves added that a time frame for the work has not been set but “I would imagine in the next year we’ll do something.” Dana Haynes, communications director for Portland Mayor Charlie Hales, confirmed that the Portland Building is not under threat of demolition and will continue to house city employees. He said Portland's annual capital budget process will begin in January and city officials likely will begin to look at what resources the city might have to address flaws with the building at that time. Haynes said he was not aware that Graves had been asked to serve on a commission to help oversee work on the building, but he said he thought that made sense. Graves’ comments about the building’s status came two months after he made an impassioned plea during a public forum in Portland that the building be spared from the wrecking ball. He said that he believes the public debate over the building’s fate and his proactive preservation stance had a role in the outcome. “I think that was a big part of it,” he said. “They didn’t want to be known as the society that tore down the Portland Building.” City officials in Portland, Oregon have been exploring options for ways to address a series of flaws with the 32-year-old building, from leaks to unpleasant working conditions to questions about its ability to withstand an earthquake. More than one city commissioner has suggested demolition. The city’s internal business services division has recommended that the building be overhauled rather than scrapped. The mayor’s office has not officially disclosed what the city plans to do to address the building’s shortcomings. The 15-story building houses about 1,300 employees. Adjacent to City Hall, it is considered one of the first major America examples of Postmodernism. Constructed for about $25 million and opened in 1982, the Portland Building drew widespread attention for its classically-inflected exterior. Colored in blue, green, salmon and cream, it features a range of decorative flourishes as well as a statue called Portlandia, and it stands out in a city where the architecture is mostly sedate and often unadorned. Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2011, the building also has been criticized for providing a dark, claustrophobic and generally unpleasant place to work and transact business with the city. There have been complaints about its small tinted windows that don’t let in much natural light, leaks, low ceilings, and an unimpressive lobby.  To address the complaints, city officials have been pondering a series of options, ranging from renovating the building to moving the employees elsewhere and razing it. Cost estimates for repairing the building have ranged from $38 million to  $95 million. According to The Oregonian newspaper, the high figure was based on analysis by  the city’s Office of Management and Finance.  The $95 million figure included the cost of relocating employees while work was underway and providing alternative space. Much of the cost would go to address structural issues such a making the building more capable of withstanding a major earthquake. The numbers have prompted some city commissioners to discuss the possibility that the building be sold or razed and replaced rather than have the city and its taxpayers spend more money to correct its shortcomings. The estimated cost of tearing the building down and building a new structure is $110 million to $400 million, according to finance office figures obtained by The Oregonian. Graves said that he doesn’t agree with the $95 million estimate for the renovation work and believes the problems can be addressed for much less. “It‘s not $90 million,” he said. “Somebody threw that out to see …if it would stick. It wasn’t true at all. It’s $38 million.” In the past, Graves has also said that although the window dimensions are fixed, it would be possible to replace the tinted glass with clear panes. Another way to keep costs down, he said, is renovating the building floor by floor, rather than emptying it out all at once and finding temporary space for the employees.

On View> Michael Graves: Past As Prologue

Michael Graves: Past As Prologue Grounds for Sculpture 19 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, NJ Through April 5, 2015 Celebrating 50 years of practice in art, architecture, and design, Michael Graves is the subject of a pair of exhibitions and an upcoming symposium at the Architectural League of New York. The largest of the shows is Past is Prologue, at Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, New Jersey. It presents lesser-known early works from the mid-1960s, his blockbuster works from the 1980s, to his current work, which ranges from architecture, to product design, to leading edge-work on accessibility issues. Uniting all these works is Graves’ interest—sometimes reverent, sometimes irreverent—in the images and forms of the past, and how he continuously reinterprets them for the future. A companion show, Michael Graves Paintings: Landscapes and Still-Lifes, will be on view at Studio Vendome in Manhattan.

Kean University announces Michael Graves School of Architecture

This Saturday, Kean University, in Union, New Jersey, will launch the Michael Graves School of Architecture in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Michael Graves Architecture & Design. Over his career, Graves has racked up an impressive list of architectural accolades including the AIA Gold Medal, the National Medal of the Arts, and the Driehaus Prize for Architecture. The new school will be housed in the university's dramatic Green Lane Academic Building, designed by the Gruskin Group. Graves is designing a new facility for his school at the university's campus in Wenzhou, China. 'I think [it's] an A-plus," said Graves referring to his Wenzhou campus, in a video released by the university. "It's one of my better buildings, if not my best building. We're really pleased with it."

Washington Monument Re-Opens to the Public: Celebrate With These 22 Beautiful Photos

After two-and-a-half years of repairs, the Washington Monument is officially back open to the public. The District’s tallest structure had been closed since 2011, when a 5.8 magnitude earthquake sent more than 150 cracks shooting through the 555-feet of marble. At the cost of $15 million—which was financed by the federal government and a private donation—all of the monument’s damaged stones were either removed or resealed, and the 55-story elevator was repaired. Some of the monument’s new marble even came out of the same Maryland quarry that supplied material for the structure when it was first built over 100 years ago. During construction, the structure was wrapped in 500 tons of scaffolding, which was designed by Michael Graves. At night, the supportive envelope was entirely lit up and appeared like hundreds of glowing bricks. To celebrate the re-opening, AN's editors gathered up 22 of the most beautiful photos of the Washington Monument through the years, dating all the way back to the beginning. Take a look below. (And also check out the monument's moving shadows on Google Maps.)

Michael Graves’ paralysis informs design for Omaha Rehabilitation Hospital

The architect of Omaha’s new rehabilitation hospital says his own paralysis has given him “greater empathy,” which has informed his designs for the healthcare industry. Local firm DLR Group and Texas-based engineering firm Page are working with Michael Graves, who lost the use of his legs in 2003 as the result of an infection, on the $93 million Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital in west Omaha. Expected to be complete in 2016, the facility will use technology to afford sedentary patients greater control over the TV, thermostat, nurse call system, and other things in their room. Omaha’s World-Herald describes how Graves, 79, drew from personal experience while designing the 250,000-square-foot hospital:
Giving patients some control over their environment is important, said Graves and Patrick Burke, a principal in Graves' firm. Graves recalled one instance early in his rehab when he was being transferred from his bed to a chair using a motorized sling. “I was getting into the chair that day and I was up in the air, in a sitting position over my chair but not in it yet. The nurse's aide's friend came in and said, 'It's time for our break.' So they left me there dangling in the air and they went on a break. That's as low as it gets.”
The average stay at Madonna is more than 30 days, but residents tend to be more mobile than many hospital patients. That creates a need for active social spaces, Graves said, but also a pitfall: many architects want hospitals to resemble hotels. “Well, I don’t,” he told the Omaha World-Herald's Bob Glissmann. “I don't think it needs a big atrium and I don't think the rooms have to look like a hotel room. These are hospital rooms, and you want to have good care. What makes the difference is the empathy.”

Stalled No More? Downtown Los Angeles Developments Could See New Life

Speaking of zombies, two of Downtown LA’s most long-stalled projects appear to be rising from the dead. The mixed-use project revolving around Julia Morgan’s beautiful Herald Examiner Building on Broadway is apparently finally getting underway, now developed by Forest City, and no longer designed by Morphosis. The designer has yet to be revealed. Also Metropolis, a multi-building megaproject designed at one point by Michael Graves back in the 1990s, is apparently being brought back by Gensler. Of course downtown giveth and downtown taketh away. We hear that Johnson Fain, who were previously designing the Bloc development, a makeover of the former Macy’s Plaza, is no longer on the project. Studio One Eleven are now, according to a project spokesperson, “moving forward with implementation.” Johnson Fain had been “engaged to assist with the development of the concept and to oversee the schematic design phase of the Bloc.” Too bad they couldn’t finish the job.

Michael Graves’ Portland Building Could Be In Jeopardy

If several Portland city commissioners have their way Michael Graves' alternately loved and hated Portland Building (1982), now facing a $95 million renovation, will be torn down. One of the most famous examples of postmodern architecture in the United States, the 15-story, 31-year-old structure is known for its small square windows, exaggerated historical motifs, playful, varied materials, gaudy colors, and, of course, its cameo on the opening to the show Portlandia (also the name of the larger-than-life statue over the building's front door). While a few elements have been renovated in recent years, most of the building is in bad shape, and  residents aren't exactly lining up to save it. Several city officials, writes the Atlantic Cities, have come out against making any more investments in it. And so the question is raised: Can a building be considered too important to tear down even if most people don't like it? Paul Goldberger, in his New York Times review of the building in 1982, called it "The most compelling architectural event of the year...It reminds us that the movement that has come to be known as Postmodernism has become vastly more than a curiosity. Now, at the end of 1982, it is unquestionably something that is having a genuine effect on the cityscape." The final decision will take months, but stay tuned to the fate of a building that everybody has an opinion about.

Product> Finds from the Floor at NeoCon East 2013

The 11th edition of NeoCon East, the sister show to Chicago's summer contract furniture fair, was held October 16 and 17. Despite the government shutdown that legally prevented some GSA employees from attending,  more than 7,000 visitors attended the show at Baltimore's Convention Center to peruse the wares of over 250 exhibitors. Keynote addresses from Michael Graves—who launched a new collection of textiles with cf stinson—and Suzanne Tick were augmented with ongoing educational seminars. Tonic Watson Designed in collaboration with San Francisco–based industrial design firm Mike & Maaike, the freestanding benching system (above) is designed with steel and MDF for both durability and flexibility. A center deck can support video and computer monitors, storage, and LED lamps with a concealed four-circuit, eight-wire raceway. Vistas cf stinson New at NeoCon East, the Vistas collection of upholstery and privacy curtains is Michael Graves' third collection with cf stinson. Six unique patterns render abstractions of the natural environment in soothing blue and green tones. Line Davis Part of the Elements accessories collection, Line is a flush-mounted vertical storage component designed by Apartment 8. A slim, recessed stainless steel bar folds down from the top of the beam, with additional hanging storage on three square knobs in vertical succession below. Line comes in 12 vibrant colors, as well as natural oak or walnut. Diffrient Smart Humanscale Designed by the late Niels Diffrient, the eponymous Smart task chair features ergonomic comforts like Humanscale's patented weight-sensitive recline mechanism that automatically adjusts to the weight and height of the sitter. Three panels of proprietary Form-Sensing Mesh adjust to various body sizes, and armrests are attached to the seat back, as opposed to the seat pan, to echo the chair's angle of recline sans additional adjustment. PolyChair Kimball Office A mesh back and seat on the PolyChair provide maximum user comfort and stacking capabilities—30 high on a dolly and 10 on the ground. Available in five different colors, the polished chrome sled base also features black plastic tabs for ganging. Focal Point OFS Available in a variety of sizes, configurations, and color combinations, Focal Point is a power-integrated seating solution for individual work and break-out group sessions. The angle of the back supports lounging posture, while the exaggerated wings provide a sense of user privacy. An optional 6-inch arm is sized for tablet usage at a table-top height. I.D. Freedom Tarkett New at NeoCon East, the line of luxury vinyl planks and tiles comes in 90 SKUs of natural looks, from bamboo to sandstone to steel. Custom shapes can also be specified from Tarkett's Alabama production facility. The collection contains 53 percent pre-consumer recycled content and is FloorScore certified to contribute to healthy indoor air quality. Cork Wolf-Gordon Sourced from the bark of living quercus suber trees, the sustainable upholstery material is naturally stain and water resistant. Wolf-Gordon's cork textiles exceed 100,000 double rubs and come in four natural colors.

June 21–23> Michael Graves to Keynote Dwell on Design in Los Angeles Next Week

From June 21 – 23 architecture and design professionals will flock to the Los Angeles Convention Center for the Dwell on Design tradeshow. With over 2,000 products, 400 exhibitors, 150 speakers, and 30,000 expected attendees, this highly anticipated three-day affair has easily become America’s largest design event. The exhibition features 20,000 square feet of space filled with prefabricated structures that highlight the most important aspects of contemporary design. The show is divided into various sections including Dwell Outdoor, the Tech Zone, the Modern Family Lounge, Furniture, and Kitchen & Bath and features renowned leaders in industrial, home appliance, and furniture design such as Miele, Kohler, GE Monogram, Resource Furniture, and Marimekko. Dwell Media has put together an exciting program for this year’s show, featuring a motivating Keynote Address to be delivered by architect and industrial designer, Michael Graves, who will share how his perspective on design and quality of life was altered as a result of his life-changing illness. Other highlights include an impressive lineup of speakers and panel discussions, the AIA/LA Restaurant Design Awards, the 3rd annual Dwell on Design Awards, two days of Green Car test drives, and Design Clinics that will offer visitors practical advice on architecture, landscape, and inerior design. While the show provides design lovers with numerous reasons to attend, the main attraction remains the prefabs that fill the show floor. Designers construct outdoor environments, complete with fresh greenery and lush vegetation, in an indoor setting. Some of this year’s most prominent exhibitors include Sett Studio, whose design philosophy holds that maximum efficiency can be achieved through a union of design, material, and space, Piece Homes, which balances an eco-friendly home with personal taste, and LivingHomes, which address environmental and urban issues through portable building. Attendees can walk through garden pods, trailers, and outdoor lounges and have their questions answered by  The Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). VIP_Amanda Dameron_Bryan Cranston_etc For more information visit: http://www.dwellondesign.com/