Posts tagged with "Miami":

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Miami embodies challenging stereotypes, but generates new architectural identities in spite of them

This article appears in The Architect’s Newspaper’s April 2017 issue, which takes a deep dive into Florida to coincide with the upcoming AIA Conference on Architecture in Orlando (April 27 to 29). We're publishing the issue online as the Conference approaches—click here to see the latest articles to be uploaded.

There are facts about Miami that challenge the American narrative on what it means to be an American, like the fact that most Miamians—documented and undocumented—have been Americans their entire lives, just more southerly located; one of the city’s major arteries is Calle Ocho (US-41), which starts at the Atlantic Ocean in Downtown Miami, stretches into the upper peninsula of Michigan, turning into a cul-de-sac, wrapping around itself and splitting the United States in two; and English has never been an official language of the United States, most evident in Miami’s creation of Spanglish. Perhaps no other interpretation can locate the problem of Miami as a most American object.

Miami is blown-out, teetering over the line of acceptable, into the realm of the incredible and back again in an instance so fleeting it can only be described in ephemeral anecdotes. Yet within this feeling there is permanence, textures embedded within the sidewalk Cuban-coffee windows, the Haitian barbecue in parking lots, the unspecified graffiti facades of new buildings, the bridge-cities connecting synthetic earth to eroding beaches, color and light used as generators for architecture, and ultimately in the multi-versed language of formalities spoken by the beautiful people of this sprawled-out, horizontal Tower of Babel.

As a capital of the end and beginning of the world, Miami’s architecture is fitting. From its colonial past through its cracker style, to its New Deal modern and art deco internationalist explosion, Miami has been equal parts parking lot and low-key laboratory for designers. Like Los Angeles, Miami had its own variation on postmodernism, thanks to unforgettable work by Arquitectonica, such as Pink House and the Atlantis; Roney Mateu’s 1984 radical, steel-and-glass Luminaire building that challenged Coral Gables’ small, terra-cotta city fabric; and Philip Johnson’s Miami Cultural Center, where one might have “Jammed at the M.A.M.” (before it became PAMM). This period saw Miami’s most prolific cocaine-funded densification, only surpassed more recently with unfettered safe-deposit-box towers dotting the skyline. Over the last 20 years, Miami has been equally critiqued for its lack of resiliency in sustainability and celebrated as an innovative southeastern center. One lesson from this contradiction is that Miami has always been both, inhabiting challenging stereotypes, while projecting new identities in spite of them.

But Miami’s architecture translates some of these conditions visually, through instances of drive-by-sidewalk cultures and mediated facades; coloration as a strategy for architecture; and resilient bridge-cityscapes. Since it’s unproductive to attempt a meager definition of everything in Miami, perhaps then the projection of new genealogies through its architecture might make it more worthwhile.

A new species of architectural element has exploded in Miami: the mediated facade. That is to say that the facade—technocratic, ornamental, relaxed, absent, and otherwise—has had a very sympathetic, albeit aesthetically allergic, ear within the history of Miami thanks to capital, climate, and culture. For example, expressive and gigantic graphics found their origins during modernism in the tile facades famously capping the sides of Enrique Gutierrez’s Bacardi Building and on Roberto Burle Marx’s sidewalk pavers, both located on Biscayne Boulevard. The mediated facade is different because it is divorced from its traditional place within the elements of architecture and the design process, more specifically in a planned loss of control for the architect. The facade in Miami began to operate differently in the Design District in the early-to-mid 2000s with an origin in Rene Gonzalez’s CIFO Art Museum. Using one million Bisazza glass mosaic tiles to represent a jungle scenography, Gonzalez harnessed postmodern communication to flatly rasterize the historical tectonic gymnastics of facades in Miami without resorting to a metaphoric translation of vegetation. However, that jungle image at CIFO not only transformed the reception of facades in the Design District via swift driving, tight parking, and slow walking, but also the transparencies and porosities of Miami’s more acceptable architectural faces.

In Wynwood, a low-resolution high-participation version of the mediated facade has taken the form of almost-bare frontal surface treatments by architects, turning the sidewalk into an outdoor lowbrow museum stroll. By leaving facades stark, architects are giving up aesthetic control and expression for a more localized collaboration, usually with painters, artists, and graffiti writers, to fill in the gap between neighborhood and interior. The result is a multivalent series of streetscapes, corridors, alleyways, and entrance sequences that extend art both into the facade-driven traditions of architecture and the urban interior, accessible when it doesn’t rain.

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Inside Zaha Hadid Architects’ under-construction One Thousand Museum in Miami

When 62 floors accommodate 83 living units, you can presume listings will not include the words “cozy” and “poky.” This, along with the fact that Zaha Hadid Architects’ (ZHA) residential high-rise in Downtown Miami is virtually column-free inside, residents can expect plenty of room—and a glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) panel or two.

Located on the water’s edge and overlooking Herzog & de Meuron’s Pérez Art Museum, ZHA’s One Thousand Museum’s curvaceous exoskeleton makes a statement. In accordance with the vernacular of condominium buildings in the city, the structural framework is all white, but that’s where the building’s flirtation with Miami modernism ends.

Instead of the once-standard stucco-and-white-paint procedure, GFRC comprises the exoskeleton’s casing. “There was an idea from the start that we wanted the architectural and structural expression to be synthesized,” said Chris Lépine, associate director at ZHA. “We wanted a very fluid exoskeleton.”

Manufactured in Dubai by cladding fabricators Arabian Profiles, 4,800 pieces of GFRC are in the process of being shipped to South Florida. Upon arriving in the Port of Miami, they are taken west to Doral, Florida, to be processed, then back to a prep yard in Miami, and finally onto the construction site.

GFRC was first used by ZHA on the Heydar Aliyev Center in Baku, Azerbaijan, where the material was used purely for cladding. In Miami, however, GFRC acts as formwork for poured concrete. This casing is assembled off-site to ensure quality control and continues its use as the exoskeleton’s finish. “It is all part of the building process, it’s not simply a cosmetic piece,” said Lépine.

Billowing at the base, gill-like forms comprise the tower’s eight parking levels. The gills act as such, providing natural ventilation to the garage area while also instigating a sense of verticality at street level. The curves coalesce and continue their way up the building, bulging at around two-thirds of the way up. Like the GFRC casing, this too was not an aesthetic choice. The wider section accommodates the structural load of the 54 floors above, including a rooftop helipad and a two-story penthouse at what Lépine described as the building’s “crown.”

While serving as a structural device and taking on the typical billowing form ascribed to Hadid’s aesthetic, the exoskeleton also produces wide-open floorplans. “We wanted it, to a degree, to reflect what was going on inside the building,” said Lépine. In addition to the penthouse, there are eight full-floor apartments and 70 half-floor units.

Much of the enclosure is set back from the face of the exoskeleton with the glazing system being abutted and sealed to the structure, thus allowing for apartments to be self-shaded. The exoskeleton is expressed inside with the GFRC entering apartments. It can also be touched. (There’s no fear of heat loss through thermal bridging in Miami.) Balconies are further recessed, “almost created as depressions behind the structure,” Lépine said, and result in the glass facade folding and faceting behind. “There is a nice interplay between the two materials, as well as with how light casts down upon the structure and fenestration,” he added.

Aside from palatial living units, One Thousand Museum is laden with luxury amenities: thirty thousand square feet of communal areas, including a two-story aquatic center, a sky lounge, a multimedia theater, a wellness spa, gym facilities, and a private event space—naturally, a “bank quality” vault is also included.

Ground broke on the building in December 2014. During the summer of 2015, one thousand trucks rolled onto site to pour 9,500 cubic yards of concrete in 24 hours to start the One Thousand Museum’s foundational work. The building is currently due for completion in 2018.

Resources

Developers: Louis Birdman, Gregg Covin, Kevin Venger, and the Regalia Group

Structural Engineer: DeSimone Consulting Engineers Construction: Plaza Construction Landscape Design: Enea Landscape Architecture Local Architect: O’Donnell Dannwolf & Partners Architects Interior Lighting:  Uli + Friends
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Miami urban planner’s car is firebombed in alleged retaliation for community activism

Sean of Miami, the blog by writer and Curbed Miami founding editor Sean McCaughan, reports that Miami-based urban planner Donald Shockey’s car was set on fire on March 11, just outside of his home near the Design District. Shockey alleges that the attack is in retaliation for his activist work in the area. McCaughan reposted a message from Shockey's personal Facebook page on his blog that explains the situation:
My car was firebombed and destroyed in front of my house a block from the Design District at 4 am this morning, likely by the same person who smashed the windows last week. This is clear retaliation for my efforts to push the city to enforce the most basic rules and standards in our neighborhood. This violent heinous hate crime will not stand. While billions are being invested in the Design District, the immediately adjacent neighborhoods need much more attention from the city in regard to crime, code enforcement, beautification, and city services. [There are] falling down fences, peeling paint, junked cars parked in yard, piles of trash, paved over front yards, cars parked blocking the sidewalk, and on and on There is a full scale arson investigation underway, it’s a major crime.
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Bold proposal for new bike bridge connecting Miami to Key Biscayne on display at Coral Gables Museum

A new exhibit at the Coral Gables Museum is now on view, providing a deeper look into "Plan Z for Miami," a proposal to create a snaking elevated platform that would provide pedestrians and cyclists with safer passage from Miami to nearby Virginia Key and Key Biscayne. The existing Rickenbacker Causeway has seen four fatal cycling accidents since 2006, spurring many cyclists to push for better bike lanes and barriers to protect them from the high-speed traffic on the bridge. Architect, urban planner, and lifelong cyclist Bernard Zyscovich saw an opportunity to promote cycling as a more viable means of transportation in Miami and launched Plan Z for Miami. The nonprofit organization has proposed two separate plans to convert Rickenbacker Causeway, the first of which involves the removal of a lane of traffic from the causeway to create a 16-foot-wide bike and pedestrian lane, separated from the motor traffic by a strip of native foliage. After concerns were raised about the removal of a lane of traffic, Zyscovich returned with Plan Z 2.0. This bolder plan proposes a completely separate bike and pedestrian lane to run the length of the causeway and connect to the proposed Underline, a ten-mile linear park running under Miami’s Metrorail. The path would then run along the William Powell Bridge, providing an observation deck for viewing the Miami skyline, then continue on to Virginia Key. Zyscovich’s plan also imagines a 20-acre waterfront park and beach at the entrance of Virginia Key, with a branch of paths connecting to Virginia Key Park, before continuing on to Key Biscayne. The project has already garnered a decent amount of positive attention from the community, according to the architect, and they will continue to show the plans to the public to rally further support while the project is in review for potential funding. The exhibit, titled Plan Z for Miami: From Infrastructure to Open Space, will be on view through May 14, 2017, at the Coral Gables Museum. For more information about the exhibit, visit the Museum’s website here. For more information about the Plan Z project itself, you can visit the organization’s website here.
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1,000-foot-tall observation tower proposed for Miami’s Downtown waterfront

Leave it to Miami to build a 1,000-foot-tall tower and top it with an exclusive club. The Skyrise Miami observation tower, designed by Miami-based Arquitectonica, is proposed to sit at Bayside Marketplace in Downtown Miami. Along with its Skytop club and Premium Observation Deck, some 900 feet above the waterfront, the tower will also include at least three other indoor and outdoor observation decks, and three theme park-like rides: the SkyRise Flying Theater ride, the bungee jump-like Sky Plunge, and the free-falling Skydrop. The base of the tower will include entertainment, retail, and restaurant space. The tower is projected to be LEED Gold Certified and is being touted for its ability to withstand wind speeds of up to 186 miles per hour. Currently, the tallest building in Miami is just under 800 feet tall. If built, the Skyrise Miami may take that title, though there are a hand full of skyscrapers proposed and under construction that will be vying for that top spot.
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Miami’s Frost Museum of Science by Grimshaw aims to be paragon of sustainable architecture

Miami’s new science museum will open its doors on May 8, 2017. The Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science (or Frost Science, for short), which sits Miami's Downtown Museum Park, is part of Miami-Dade County’s initiative to make Miami a “cultural hub.” The 250,000-square-foot campus—designed by London-based Grimshaw Architects, who worked with local firm Rodriguez and Quiroga—is divided into four entities: the Planetarium, Aquarium, North Wing, and West Wing, which will include exhibit space, the Learning Center, the museum’s Science Store, and a museum café. The building is designed to be an exhibit itself, with examples of sustainable building practices and local wildlife. A rooftop urban farm and “Living Core” will be dedicated to showcasing native vegetation, while a solar terrace of photovoltaic panels will supply the building with energy. As part of the museum’s Everglades exhibit, there will also be an on-site wetland. These features should help the project achieve its expected LEED Gold rating. “The technology, engineering, and sustainability features found throughout the museum rival those on a global stage and will inspire and motivate generations to come,” said Frank Steslow, Frost Science President, in a press release. “Our goal is that Frost Science will be an international destination and vibrant educational space that encourages curiosity and investigation.” On top of the building’s built-in experiences, the museum will also feature exhibits on the history of flight, from dinosaurs to aerospace engineering, and the physics of light, and will, of course, provide ample opportunities to engage with local wildlife at the three-level aquarium. The museum is currently in its final stages of construction, awaiting the arrival of its new inhabitants. For more information about the museum’s exhibits or to purchase tickets, visit their website here.
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Renderings unveiled of Miami’s future tallest skyscraper

Tibor Hollo, developer and president of Florida East Coast Realty (FECR), recently indicated a 40-month construction timeline for One Bayfront Plaza, a 92-story tower in downtown Miami designed by New York City–based Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF). In an interview with The Next Miami, Hollo referred to the project as “the building of the future,” touting its 104,000 square feet of retail space and direct connection to the Metromover transit station across Biscayne Boulevard. The tower will stand 1,049 feet tall, curtailed only by the Federal Aviation Administration which limits the maximum buildable height in Miami’s urban area. However, despite this limitation, One Bayfront Plaza will be Miami’s tallest tower, soaring a couple hundred feet higher than the imminent Panorama Tower, which will apex at 868 feet when completed. (Miami-based Arqitectonica is also designing an 80-story tower in nearby Brickell, though no word on its exact height yet.) Apart from its superlative height, the tower also breaks formal ranks: It's shaped with sinuous contours that contrast with the rectilinear silhouettes of downtown. The tower starts as a triangle at the base and seemingly twists as it rises into the air. According to Hollo, the tower will house more than 900 living units, a 200-key hotel, and 532,000-square-feet of office space. Construction is set to begin in January 2019.
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OMA-designed Faena Forum opens in Miami

OMA designed three buildings nestled between Miami Beach’s famous Collins Avenue and Indian Creek Drive in Mid-Beach. The project is a significant contribution to the Faena District, a $1.2 billion project covering six blocks and integrating dynamic cultural, residential, hotel, retail, culinary, and public environments.

OMA’s structures are all governed by independent programs: the Faena Forum with flexible theater uses, the Bazaar that retrofits a historic hotel with curated retail and event programming, and a state-of-the-art car park. Shohei Shigematsu, partner at OMA and the director of its New York office, led design efforts on the project.

A central focus of the new district is the Forum, which opened on November 27. The building is composed of two volumes—a cylinder and a cube—that are similar in size and can be combined or subdivided to support any type of production, from projects and commissions to performances, exhibitions, and events. A circular stair that descends from an impressive 46-foot cantilever denotes the main entrance. This leads up into the lobby of the building, which the architects elevated in response to concerns over rising sea levels. The design move freed up ground-floor space for loading functions and helped to provide a canopy along Collins Avenue. The architects explained that this extended the public domain into and under the building. Shigematsu said the formal strategy of the Forum’s radiused, cantilevered facade was inspired by the firm’s research into urban planning principles. “The Forum’s circular plan enables the public domain to expand, activating pedestrian movement within the district,” he said. “A 45-foot cantilever allows the landscaped plaza to slip under the Forum along Collins, providing a dramatic sense of arrival.”

Faena Forum 3300-3398 Collins Avenue Miami Beach, FL Tel: 305-534-8800 Architect: OMA

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From affordable housing to parks, inside the versatile Fort Lauderdale-based Glavovic Studio

When Miami clients want a high-profile designer, they often bring in architects from New York and London simply because marketing demands signature international brand names. The developing streetscape of Wynwood, Miami’s Art District, has buildings by scores of important architects from every city but Miami.

But the city has its own, often-underappreciated talent. For example, there is Fort Lauderdale-based Glavovic Studio and its founding principal Margi Glavovic Northard, who has the resume of an architect one would usually find practicing in New York or Los Angeles: She was educated at SCI-Arc, taught at UCLA, and worked for Smith-Miller+Hawkinson in New York before opening her own practice. In Los Angeles, Northard met Robert Mangurian who told her to “go to a place where you can make a difference.”

Taking this advice, she started her Florida firm in 1999. The local projects she cobbled together make her someone who should be better known outside Florida. Northard, who is from South Africa, brings a global perspective and ambition into her practice that attempts to link local ideas, traditions, and needs with a broader international perspective. She said she admires the way Canadian Frank Gehry arrived in California and worked with the local vernacular to create truly revolutionary designs. 

But, unlike Herzog & de Meuron, for example, who practice in the small city of Basel and won the prestigious Miami Art Museum (now Pérez), she does not just pitch glamorous cultural projects. “We are part of the local community that wants to be part of a larger conversation, and we are able to connect them to a global conversation,” she said. Indeed the firm focuses on local public housing, community centers, parks, and libraries because Nothard believes architects are, as she put it, “cultural change agents and facilitators.” She made the conscious decision to design affordable housing because she believes affordability is a broader notion than just low income.

At one affordable housing project, Kennedy Homes, Nothard claimed to have expanded the discussion “from affordable to affordability.”  The design work, she asserted, is about “creating change” with a commitment to design buildings that are “direct experiences.” She said that she was asked to design a gazebo and “ended up doing an artist center for the community” that has enriched the town and region. It would be a sign of Miami’s maturity as a design center, something boosters point to, for her to be given a project in Wynwood, Brickell, or on Collins Avenue.

Young Circle Arts Park Hollywood, Florida

This 10-acre cultural center is located in downtown Hollywood, Florida. Its park immerses visitors in native landscapes and offers visual and performing arts programming and community activities. Two buildings include the Visual Arts Pavilion, which provides classrooms, a glass blowing studio, metal studio, painting studio, exhibition program, and support facilities, as well as the Performing Arts Pavilion, which contains a stage and lawn seating.

Kennedy Homes Affordable Housing Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Kennedy Homes is a 132-unit LEED Gold affordable housing project poised at the gateway to the City of Fort Lauderdale. Its living spaces are spread into eight residential buildings, with three community buildings housed in renovated structures, providing a gymnasium, library, and meeting and leisure rooms. The 8.5-acre site is developed as an expanded green space within an urban landscape.

Girls' Club Collection Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Located on a quiet street on the northern edge of downtown Fort Lauderdale, Girls’ Club is an artist studio, a gallery, a foundation, and a quasi-public space. The 1984 masonry building has a reconfigured facade layered with light, color, landscape, and enigmatic materials that employ local craft techniques and industrial references.

Sunset Hammock Tamarac, florida

Sunset Hammock, a public art project in Tamarac’s Sunset Point Park, renders moments in time through increasing intensity and color. It explores the expansiveness of the Everglades through the study of wetland topographies and tectonic forms.

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Top picks from Miami’s art and design week

The annual December Miami art week has come to a close and the dealers, collectors, and artists have packed up their wares and headed home for another year. The centerpiece fair Art Basel, its next door tented neighbor Design Miami, and the nearly twenty other shows will likely be already thinking about 2017. But for the collectors and audience, it’s also time to go through our telephone camera images and remember what stood out and still looks good a day later on a computer screen. There are, of course, scores of art and design works at these fairs to interest an architect who wants to be inspired, educated, or seduced by visual eye candy. In retrospect, the objects and images that stood out to an architect's eye are really too numerous to mention but here are few highlights worth spending more time reviewing. The best single image to this architect's eye was surely Thomas Struth’s chromogenic print Schaltwerk 1 (2016) from Berlin at Marian Goodman Gallery, but there were dozens of other photographs that stood out, including Gordon Parks's Untitled, Mobile (1956) that depicts a sign reading “For Sale Lots for Colored…” and Nicola Lopez’s photo and hand-drawn image on a wall of an imaginary building rising like a modern totem. The print image that most fits the dark fears of today's racial conflict is perhaps James Casebere’s Vestibule (2016) for Sean Kelly Gallery; the object that raises the potential of playful fears is from Austrian Erwin Wurm in his Fat House Moller/Adolf Loos (2013) from Cristina Guerre Gallery. This year's fair had few sculptural objects for an architect's enjoyment, but American Brutalism (1978) by Marlon de Azambuja from Brazil (where he was “brought up in a place of full-scale utopias”) is different. It takes architectural “thinking and building” and creates a small scale megastructure of industrial blocks and clamps. It reminds us how powerful the connection between art and architecture can and should be in the gallery and real world.
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Arquitectonica to design new $1 billion “Innovation District” in Miami

Developer Tony Cho and investor Bob Zangrillo, the CEOs of Dragon Global and Metro 1 respectively, aim to transform the neighborhood of Little Haiti in Miami. Working with Miami studio Arquitectonica, the pair proposes that areas between Northeast 60th and 64th streets to the south and north, and Northeast Second Avenue and a railroad line to the west and east, be developed (in phases) as a gargantuan mixed-use project. 170,000 square feet of the site's former industrial spaces will be repurposed to include an innovation center for start-ups and businesses. According to the Miami Herald, Cho and Zangrillo hope to bring entrepreneurs to the $1 billion campus and keep them there, offering housing and spaces to both work and play. “We are investing money, cleaning things up, bringing more street lights and security in the neighborhood; we’re bringing in art, creating jobs,” Cho said. “I see Miami melding as an urban node. These are all becoming very interesting neighborhoods.” Phase one of the "Innovation District" will see the construction of a sculpture garden, a 30,000-square-foot "Magic City Studios," and the innovation center. The latter will span 15,000 square feet and be part of the "Factory," which will also feature an amphitheater for events. Despite the wealth of square footage available, none will be allocated to parking, furthering the walkable and pedestrian friendly campus feel of the development. Instead, small apartments will negate the need for what Cho calls a “behemoth garage space” that would take up valuable land and only drive up the cost of housing. Speaking in the Wall Street Journal, Cho added that ride-hailing apps would plug the transport gap. The Herald, meanwhile, also reports that listed tenants so far include Salty Donut, Aqua Elements, Photopia, Baby Cotton, ICA (Institute of Contemporary Art), Wynwood Shipping, and Etnia Barcelona.
Phase one is so far penned for 2018 and will be privately financed. The Zangrillo and Cho also mentioned that office and retail space, affordable workforce housing, including micro-units, and even a boutique hotel could possibly come in the future.
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BIG’s two luxury Miami towers spiral into the sky

A decade ago, Sweden's tallest building went up with a twist. The "Turning Torso" by Santiago Calatrava rises up elegantly on the coast of Malmö, a low-rise city that is Sweden's third largest. That same year, across the equally impressive Øresund Bridge that links Copenhagen with Malmö, a sprightly 31-year-old Bjarke Ingels was founding his studio, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) in the Danish capital (his hometown). Today, Calatrava's tower still lays claim to its 2005 title, but Ingels' firm has arguably reached greater heights since then. Just over a decade later, BIG has completed its second project in the United States: The Grove at Grand Bay, a pair of luxury 20-story towers that emulate Calatrava's contortions. From Malmö to Miami, however, climatic conditions could not be more different. While cold winds bash the Swedish shoreline, appearing to sculpt Calatrava's work into shape, the same cannot be said in humid south Florida (except for the occasional hurricane, maybe). However, that is not to say BIG's towers are out of place. The glass-clad twisting high-rises at Coconut Grove on Miami's coast bring with them a welcome breeze to the area–even if only implied. Accommodating 98 units, the two towers have floor plates that have been rotated incrementally by three feet from the third floor through the 17th. This feature, twinned with the 12-foot-tall custom insulated fenestration that traces the perimeter of each floor, facilitates balcony space that offers views over the tranquil Biscayne Bay. Panoramic vistas, in fact, can be found all around, especially on the upper levels where residents can look onto South Beach and downtown Miami, something which Ingels said echoes the expansive views associated with the "Caribbean sense of modernism" found in the vicinity. "The main view, though, is out over the water," said Ingels at a presentation of the project in his Manhattan office. The winding nature of the towers caters to the ocean, allowing the luxury units, which range in size from 1,276 to 10,118 square feet (2 – 6 bedrooms), as much exposure as possible to the waterfront vista. "Even though they are perceived as side-by-side, they don't block each other's views," Ingels explained. Optimum orientation, he continued, is realized at the 17th floor—three levels below the top. Ingels also discussed the task of structuring the buildings, for which BIG sought the expertise of Vincent DeSimone, who passed away this November. He described DeSimone (whom he referred to as “Vince”) as a “visionary" and called him "one of the greatest engineers" he worked with in his practice. DeSimone's solution saw poured concrete columns follow the floor plan, rotating with the structure, appearing at a glance to wrap around the building. As for the amenities for the project, luxury add-ons come thick and fast. Five pools for all residents, a 25-meter lap pool, a jacuzzi as well as four more pools for residents in each tower and the owners of rooftop penthouses are included. A fitness center, private treatment spa, and even a spa for pets comes too, along with a library, private dining room, and a "kids and teen room." Developer Terra has spent big on art with $1.2 million going toward sculpture and works in a curated art gallery. Parking for owners of dwellings above 4,000 square feet is also available on site. Unit pricing ranges from $2.96 to $25 million—though all are sold out.