Posts tagged with "Miami":

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Porsche Design Group Breaks Ground on Miami Condo Tower With a Car Elevator

The architectural climate of Miami has been red hot recently, with dozens of towers being built by some of the world’s leading architects—including all-stars Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Bjarke Ingels, and Herzog & de Meuron. And with the city's reputation for high-design parking garages, it's no secret that the Magic City has a soft spot for the automobile. Now, a new designer very familiar with the road aims to break into the Miami sky. The Wall Street Journal reported that Porsche Design Group broke ground in April on a 60-story luxury residential tower, which will feature an automobile elevator allowing each tenant to park their luxury vehicle right beside their living room. The 132-unit tower is Porsche’s first venture into residential development, and it seems to be working out, with half the units already reported sold. The building’s kicker, the car elevator, may already be familiar to Manhattanites since architect Annabelle Selldorf introduced the high-end concept to her 200 Eleventh Avenue tower in 2010. Tenants at the 641-foot, ultra-luxury Porsche Design Tower Miami will be able to pull their cars into the building’s central elevator shaft, ride up to their floor, and park in a “sky-garage” directly connected to their unit—without ever leaving their car. But be prepared to pay for that privilege. Units range from 4,200 to 17,000 square feet and will cost between $4.5 million and $25 million. In addition to the lift, the building will contain other lavish features for lovers of luxury and auto-enthusiasts alike, including a plunge pool, ocean-view ballroom, outdoor kitchens, spas, and a “car concierge” given the duty to monitor and maintain residents’ high-end rides. Even the building’s website is exclusive, forcing users to register to catch a glimpse of the renderings.
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2013 Landmark Miami Competition Announces Winning Entries

Winners are in for the 2013 Landmark Miami competition. In DawnTown's sixth international ideas competition they challenged designers to explore the iconography of cities by creating a new landmark for the future of Miami that could be placed in Bayfront Park. Landmark Miami received over 100 entries from all over the world, including El Salvador, Cuba, Iran, the Philippines, and France. The jury selected three winners plus an honorable mention. 1st Place Project Name: Miami Lift Team Name: Studio Dror Location: New York City From the design team: Miami's extensive beaches, unique culture, and prime location for cruise travel create a cohesive identity, allowing the city itself to be an icon. Miami Lift pays tribute to this by elevating visitors giving them a new perspective of the city. 2nd Place Project Name: Lemonade Square Team Name: REMED Tame Members: David Giraldeau, Alexandre Guilbeault Locations: Montreal From the design team: The concept of Lemonade Square is a perforated platform of 57,600 square feet, floating above the ground. Floating on delicate legs, this museum-like object succeeds at creating superimposed plazas with contemporary characters. The upper level holds giant wading pools and allows people to escape from summer heat. Underneath, a glamorous public place benefits from the surprising sunlight effects and offers to the city a unique contemplative site. 3rd Place Project Name: Torre De Las Americas Team Members: Mauricio Gonzalez, Alfredo Anida Location: Miami/Santiago, Chlie From the design team: The Tower of the Americas is a spatial deluge. It is a vertical flood of platforms that creates an open exhibit that celebrates the diversity of our emergent metropolis. This open tower works with the vertigo of public space. It challenges its visitors as does the Eiffel Tower in Paris. It is a hiking museum. In each one of the platforms different events are generated. The tower is open, thus reducing the resistance to the torque forces generated by the wind. The proposal has a system of Multiple Tunned-Mass-Dampers and very short spans between the chromed columns. This strategy will allow for this tower to be the "tallest-slender tower" building in the world. Honorable Mention Project Name: Great Spirit Woods Team Name: Vojtěch Kolář + VIZarch.cz Team Members: Jakub Frolik & Vojtěch Kolář Location: Brno, Czech Republic From the design team: Great Spirit Woods is located in the southern part of Bayfront Park, which has always been a place of relax and rest. Idea of this proposal is to maintain these values and enrich them. Walking through an artificial forest made of steel columns of a circular cross-section...the highest columns rise up to 500 feet, the whole monumental project also has a function of a lighthouse.
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Glimpse Miami’s Abandoned Marine Stadium and the New Perez Art Museum Miami

Last month AN compiled a list of the most high profile projects taking place in Miami, and on a recent trip to the Magic City, we had the opportunity to visit two of these sites: the shuttered Marine Stadium and Herzog and de Meuron's new building for the Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM). While new developments flood Miami, preservationists are fighting to save and revive the abandoned Marine Stadium on Virginia Key by Cuban-born architect Hilario Candela. In 2009, the graffiti-covered venue that once held powerboat racing events and large-scale concerts, was placed on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s list of “11 Most Endangered Historic Places.” Now that the advocacy group, Friends of Miami Marine Stadium, has won the approval from Miami City Commission for its Virginia Key Master Plan, including the restoration of the 6,566-seat stadium, the next step is winning the approval for the site plan and raising $20 million. When the Miami Art Museum started to outgrow its cramped quarters in Philip Johnson's Miami-Dade Cultural Center, museum officials and board members selected Herzog and de Meuron to design a new building (now dubbed the Perez Art Museum Miami) right on Museum Park overlooking Biscayne Bay, what Jorge Perez, real estate developer and the benefactor of the museum, has said is the "last big piece of public land downtown." "The board wanted a building that was first functional, and not just a piece of sculpture," said Thom Collins, Director of PAMM. The concrete and glass structure is a nod to Stiltsville, a vernacular form of architecture originally built on the bay in the 1930s, and will house a variety of exhibition spaces to accommodate works of different scale. "Our project was principally driven by the recognition of the fact that Miami is becoming a home for contemporary art," said Collins. "Our building now has no room for storage or conservation, or education."
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Unveiled> One Thousand Museum, Zaha Hadid’s first skyscraper in the West

Miami’s real estate market is climbing yet again after a few years of tense halts in new projects following the 2007 recession. Among the towers set to rise in the Magic City's downtown is a residential high-rise designed by  Pritzker prize-winner Zaha Hadid, who is also designing a dramatic parking structure in the city. Expectations of the new structure are soaring, and a set of renderings of the tower have recently been released. Developed by local hotshots Gregg Covin and Louis Birdman, the One Thousand Museum luxury condominium will be built amid a row of existing condo towers along Biscayne Boulevard just across from what will soon be Museum Park. Set to open by 2018, the 62-story residential tower consists of 83 units costing anywhere from $4 to $30 million each. Among the highly luxurious features are a helipad and an amenity deck with multiple pools and cabanas. The units are massive and packed with enough features to entertain any Miami sun worshiper during their indoor moments, such as private elevators, media rooms, midnight kitchens, and libraries. Full-floor units will measure approximately 11,000 square feet each and will be available in two distinct layouts. Half floor units will measure 5,400 square feet and townhouse units will measure 8,600 square feet. One Thousand Museum will be Zaha Hadid’s first skyscraper in the western hemisphere, another feather in the cap of Miami’s star-studded renewal.
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Miami’s development booming: Top 11 starchitect-designs remaking the Magic City

After a tumultuous few years, Miami’s real estate market is on the rise once again. When the recession hit the city in 2007, new developments came to a dramatic halt and abandoned construction sites became ubiquitous. But now, a surge of new projects—running the gamut from residential and retail to hotels and cultural institutions—are cropping up around Miami with many more slated for construction in the next few years. And some heavy hitters, such as Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Herzog and de Meuron, and Bjarke Ingels, have signed up to lend their design sensibility to Miami's changing landscape. The Miami Herald reported that the city now boasts 20 new condo towers with an additional five towers in the works for neighborhoods just north and south of downtown Miami. AN has compiled a list of the most significant projects taking shape in the Magic City. Collins Park Garage by Zaha Hadid Your typical parking garage is usually a utilitarian, aesthetically bland structure that falls short on imagination. The city of Miami, however, has been reversing this trend and has commissioned architects to elevate the run-of-the-mill car park into a one-of-a-kind piece of architecture that draws visitors. Zaha Hadid is the latest architect to put her spin on the parking garage. For Collins Park, she has designed a sleek, curving structure that offers 400 parking spaces and retail on the ground level. The car park is in the process of being built. 1000 Museum by Zaha Hadid Zaha Hadid is leaving her imprint on Miami. Next up, she'll design a high-end residential tower, One Thousand Museum, for local developers Gregg Covin and Louis Birdman, that will be located on Biscayne Boulevard in Downtown Miami across from what will be Museum Park. According to Miami Condo Investments, the luxury high-rise will consist of 83 units and will run from $4 million up $12 million. Jade Signature by Herzog & De Meuron It seems like Herzog & De Meuron always have something brewing in Miami. The firm just released renderings of their new luxury condo, Jade Signature, located right on the ocean in Sunny Isles Beach. The planned 650-foot-tall, 55-story tower, though, might be over the Federal Aviation Administration’s height limit since any building over 499-feet at that location is considered dangerous. Asi Cymbal Building by TEN Arquitectos Developer Asi Cymbal has selected Enrique Norten and TEN Arquitectos to design a new mid-rise commercial building in Miami’s Design District. The development will consists of high-end retail, parking, offices, event space, and rooftop restaurant. The developer and Curbed Miami are currently holding a competition to name the new building. Portside Miami PortMiami launched a competition in 2011 commissioning plans for a new commercial district, dubbed the World Trade Center, and just recently revealed finalist PlusUrbia’s designs, which consists of a mix of infrastructure updates and major commercial and residential development. PlusUrbia’s plan includes new cruise-ship terminals and berths, and according to Curbed, skyscrapers, an expanded marina, hotels, retail, and luxury towers. SLS Hotel by Arquitectonica and Philippe Starck The chatter in Miami is that local developer Jorge Perez of the Related Group plans on building a 132-room SLS hotel designed by Arquitectonics with interiors by Philippe Starck, in addition to 450 condos ranging in size from 720 to 1,500 square feet, in the Brickell area. The 51-story tower is currently under pre-construction and is expected to be complete in 2015. The Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science by Grimshaw The new Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science (formally the Miami Science Museum), designed by Grimshaw Architects, is a $273 million complex that will house galleries, a planetarium, and wildlife center. This 250,000-square-foot building, located in Museum Park, will function like a “living building” with a vegetated roof and neighboring wetlands. The project is expected to be completed by 2014. Miami Marine Stadium This modernist 6,566-seat stadium perched on the Virginia Key has been abandoned for over twenty years, but now, steps are being taken to bring it back to life. Cuban-American architect Hilario Candela’s concrete modernist stadium is the first purpose-built venue for powerboat racing in the US. A few years ago, the stadium, now listed as a National Treasure, received $3 million in funding from Miami-Dade County Commissioners to preserve the modernist stadium and also turn it back into a water sports venue with concerts. At the end of last year, the Marine Stadium site plan, which includes a “Flex Space Park” and “Maritime Center” for operations and amenities, won the city’s approval, and next it goes in front of the Miami City Commission and the Miami Sports and Exhibition Authority. Once the plan gets the green light, Friends of Miami Marine Stadium will focus their efforts on fundraising for the stadium. The Grove at Grand Bay by Bjarke Ingels Group The once popular celebrity-frequented Grand Bay Hotel will become the site of Bjarke Ingels’ two new twisting residential towers in Coconut Grove. The 20-story luxurious high-rises will feature terraces, wraparound balconies, and a roof deck with private and communal pools. The $400 million project is slated for completion in 2014. Miami Beach Convention Center The competition is heating up in Miami between two developments teams vying for the massive Miami Beach Convention Center project. According to Curbed, Rem Koolhaas, the architect on the South Beach ACE team (with developers Robert Wennett and Tishman and landscape architect Raymond Jungles), went head to head with Bjarke Ingels of the Portman-CMC team (with developr Ugo Columbo and landscape architects West 8) at a public meeting a few weeks ago to show off their designs. Both teams propose new landscaping and parks, retail space, and residential developments for the 52-acre site in addition to plans for the convention center and updating the area around City Hall. Pérez Art Museum Miami Just as Herzog & de Meuron embarks on the Jade Signature tower, the firm is nearing completion of its 200,000 square-foot Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM and formally know as  the Miami Art Museum). The new three-story building will house interior and exterior programming space for the museum’s collections and special exhibitions; an educational complex with classrooms, auditorium, and digital workspaces; and a restaurant and store. Shaded by a canopy, the museum will sit on an elevated platform and open to a veranda and plazas. If all goes as planned, the new building will be open to the public by fall of 2013.
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Zaha Hadid to Design Residential Tower in Downtown Miami

New York said no, but Miami says yes. After losing out to Norman Foster to design a tower in Midtown Manhattan, Zaha Hadid has been asked to design her first skyscraper in the Western hemisphere in downtown Miami, the Miami Herald reported. No design has been released, but the new residential tower will be located at 1000 Biscayne Boulevard on the site of a BP gas station on the city's waterfront Museum Park, seen in red above. The site is part of a row of condo towers along the boulevard known as the "Biscayne Wall." Developers Gregg Covin and Louis Birdman aren't releasing details, but told the Herald the project will be officially unveiled early next year. As AN previously reported, Hadid is also building a new parking garage in Miami, which was approved for construction in November. Elsewhere in North American, Hadid is working on a dramatic house in San Diego and has been designing smaller-scale interiors and products. Also check out renderings of Hadid's Manhattan proposal here.
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An Instagrammers-Eye-View of Art Basel Miami Beach 2012

(Editor's Note: FXFOWLE Architect’s PR head, Karen Bookatz, offers a brief, Instagrammed account of architecture and design highlights at Art Basel Miami Beach 2012.) Don’t get me wrong: I love art and I love attending art fairs. They provide one a unique opportunity to see what’s fresh and new in the art and design industries—or whatever trade is being rep’d—every few months. For me, however, a booth is a booth is a booth. Art fairs must continue to find new ways of further distinguishing themselves or otherwise run the risk of conventionality. What Frieze did last May with SO-IL’s tent design (and to a lesser extent, Bade Stageberg and Cox’s environmental design effort for The Armory Show 2012) was a major step in the right direction. Likewise, custom installations and collaborative efforts, while public relations/marketing ventures more than anything else, have proven to be undeniably effective in creating buzz and increasing visibility for the respective firm, artist, or collaborative. (This is why I was personally so adamant about my own firm’s presence—with an architectural installation/lounge project at the Miami Project art fair—at this year’s Basel.) Untitled Art Fair | Keenan/Riley Architects The example of Frieze was most certainly a source of inspiration behind the new Untitled Art Fair, the tent of which was designed by Keenan/Riley Architects . I had the chance to chat up the founder of Untitled over sunset cocktails on Friday evening. I asked if he was considering commissioning a new tent designer for subsequent years—an RFP, or a call for proposals, perhaps? Unfortunately, this did not seem like his intention, but I nevertheless applauded his efforts. And the location of the fair—right off 5th and Ocean Drive on the beach—was off the chain. Guiro | Absolut Art Bureau Perfectly situated on the beach (between the W Hotel and the The Setai), Guiro, Absolut Art Bureau’s glowing, egg-shaped installation that—quite literally—secreted vodka for nine hours every evening, all in view of top-notch curated art and music programming, is exactly what the doctor ordered. I can’t wait to see what Absolut Art Bureau has in store for us next year. Drift | Snarkitecture There’s not much else to report on this crowd-pleasing, Louise Bourgeois-inspired installation other than restating the obvious: it was awesome and there should have been/should be more installations like it. Miami Art Museum Construction Tour | Herzog & De Meuron A first for me at—what is, now, my fourth—Art Basel: a construction site tour. I spent a beautiful Saturday morning on an intimate site tour of Herzog & de Meuron’s new project for the Miami Art Museum—which is slated to open at Basel 2013—led by Jacques Herzog, in the flesh, along with MAM director Thom Collins. Perfect structure, perfect site….perfect everything.
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In Miami, A Lounge Shows FXFOWLE’s Handiwork

Fabrikator

At Miami Basel, a digitally fabricated pavilion marries classic origami techniques with advanced technology

For this year’s inaugural Miami Project Fair, the design team at FXFOWLE Architects, led by Sarah Gerber, created a temporary architectural pavilion, the FXFOWLE Lounge, from both cutting-edge technology and good-old-fashioned manual labor. The 24-foot-long pavilion embodies the “duality of this very high-tech and sophisticated fabrication and this very low-tech material and assembly process,” said designer Lucio Santos. Over the next few days, the sculpture will be housed in a lounge and bar area outfitted with beanbag chairs and a carbon fiber bar that FXFOWLE also designed for the event. In past years, architects such as David Adjaye, Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY, and Rachely Rotem and Phu Hoang (now of Modu), have designed temporary pavilions for Miami Basel—introducing their work to a wider audience. This project is “a first” Santos said, but this might be changing for FXFOWLE, which is trying to branch out on the digital side of architecture.
  • Fabricator FXFOWLE
  • Designer FXFOWLE
  • Location Miami
  • Date of Completion  December 2012
  • Materials Museum white board, Elmer's glue, stock adhesive, and cable ties
  • Process RhinoScript, laser cutting, and folding
“FXFOWLE has never designed a pavilion like this fully utilizing scripted computational methods for design and fabrication. We typically work on much larger scale projects where computational and parametric processes are sometimes used in conceptual design phases for form finding and especially for facade studies,” Santos said. “The office is making an active effort to explore the potential of different digital tools, platforms, and workflows. We have used this pavilion as an internal research project and will continue developing and integrating these digital processes to other projects in the office.” From the get-go, Santos knew that FXFOWLE “wanted to create an organic sculptural form with a non-repetitive textural pattern utilizing computational design and fabrication methods.” Using RhinoScript, Santos and his colleagues created a series of scripts to first generate a pattern onto a base surface, then unroll and label each component, create tabs around each component for assembly, and generate score and cut lines for laser cutting. Through layer controls and color values, they were able identify all the components. And, since all 180 segments are unique, this enabled them to “organize the enormous quantity of components,” Santos explained. The process, which required some dexterity, took three weeks of folding in-house, and then four days of assembling in Miami. Santos and his team—which included Kazuhiro Adachi, Karen Bookatz, and Miwa Fukui—set out to “test the structural properties of paper,” and then employed “basic origami techniques” using museum white board, which is typically used for picture frame mats. The segments were then assembled into 18 ribs (ten panels to a rib), held together by Elmer’s glue and a stock adhesive, and then secured with cable ties. “It took a few iterations, but we finally found the right fit,” said Santos.
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Frank Gehry to Masterplan Miami’s Landmark Bacardi Complex

Frank Gehry should be plenty busy with ambitious plans to revitalize downtown Toronto and to expand Facebook’s offices on the boards. Now, Gehry has been commissioned by the National YoungArts Foundation (NYAF) to update one of Miami’s most elegant and historically significant urban spaces: The Bacardi Complex on Biscayne Boulevard. Purchased below market for $10 million by the NYAF—a nonprofit arts organization that helps aspiring high school artists—Gehry will convert the former 3.5 acre corporate campus into a new arts complex. “By acquiring the Bacardi campus we are able to honor and preserve an important part of Miami’s cultural history,” Paul T. Lehr, executive director of YoungArts, said in a statement. Known for his curvaceous object-buildings, Gehry has already addressed obvious concerns from local community members and historic preservationists. “It’s not going to be a building that’s architecturally published in any way,” he told The New York Times, suggesting that his renovations won't include his typical flourishes on the campus' exterior. “But it’s a place I want to go.” A jewel of Miami Modernism (MiMo), the complex houses the beautifully-proportioned, 8-story Bacardi Headquarters Building (1963), a structure that elegantly fuses European, Latin American, and Caribbean Modern influences. Arguably one of Cuban architect Enrique Gutierrez’s best projects (designed in collaboration with Mies van der Rohe), Bacardi quickly became a symbol of hope and nostalgia to Miami’s newly immigrated Cuban community, a burst of intense formal beauty on an otherwise banal Miami streetscape. Its solid north-south facades showcase tropical murals designed by Brazilian artist Francisco Brennand, who used 28,000 6" by 6" hand-painted blue and white ceramic tiles to produce a warm, exotic contrast to the cool, gridded glass facade floating above the street. Behind the tower, a smaller, 2-story annex building nicknamed “The Jewel Box on a Pedestal” (1975) hovers 47-feet above the street. Designed by local Coral Gables architect Ignacio Carrera-Justiz , the Jewel Box also fuses architecture, culture, and art. Its exuberant one-inch thick glass mosaic walls,  produced by French stained glass artists Gabriel and Jacques Loire, were designed by German artist Johannes Dietz to reference the rich and complex rum-making process. Miami's Preservation Board designated the complex, including its buildings, “historic” in October 2009, prohibiting demolition and protecting its heritage from insensitive alterations. Gehry, who has long been friends with NYAF's founders, will make interior alterations to accommodate new educational programs, design a new public park, and build a new performing arts center to replace an existing—non-landmarked—office building. “I have been a mentor to some of the YoungArts students and know what a tremendous impact this organization has on them,” Gehry said in a statement. “It’s a privilege to help make a new home for YoungArts, so it can do even more for these wonderful young people.”
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Quick Clicks> Carchitecture, Cats, Litter, Blight

[ Quick Clicks> A guided tour of interesting links from across the web. And beyond. ] Carchitecture. What happens when you hire Herzog & de Meuron to design your parking garage? People suddenly begin to push out the cars. That seems to be the case in Miami Beach according to a NY Times article on the upscale soirees and and tourists that have become common place in the uncommon structure. Cats on Broadway. No, it's not a return of Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical, but a proposal to add a little theatrics to Chicago's Broadway. Curbed reports that the proposal is part of an IIT thesis project calling for a pedestrian-oriented street complete with a statue of a giant waving car (or more properly, a Maneki Neko). Please Litter. Could the latest trend in snail mail be a pro-littering campaign? According to TreeHugger, Google has embedded seeds in paper (recycled, of course) for a recent mailer. The letter advises its recipient to "plant in a sunny spot with a thin layer of soil... and watch it grow." Abandonment. Detroit has become infamous for its ruins, and ruins can be oh so seductive, but Noreen Malone at The New Republic says it's time to end our infatuation with "ruin porn." Malone takes aim at the message a deserted photograph devoid of people sends when Detroit's abandoned are left out of the abandonment. [ Photo credit: joevare/flickr. ]
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Towering Beacon Awaits Approval in Miami Beach

You won't see German artist Tobias Rehberger's proposed Lighthouse installation at this year's Art Basel exhibition in Miami Beach, but if the city approves the project next week, the towering beacon could be lighting up the night sky by the end of 2011.  To be located in South Pointe Park at a cost of $500,000, the 55-foot tall Lighthouse is comprised of stacked cylinders and would represent Rehberger's first public commission in the United States. [ Via The Art Newspaper. ]
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Design Miami: Under the Big Top

Design Miami is all about furnishings as art, parties, being someplace warm in December, and more parties. It’s not so much about architecture, except that the most riveting eye-grabber is often an installation by an architect. In 2006, Zaha Hadid, named Designer of the Year, created a plasticene web of wonder that ensorcelled the interior atrium of the Moore Building in the Design District. More recently ArandaLasch created tents set up closer to the action and directly in front of the convention center where Art Basel Miami Beach is located. This year the tent went to New York architects Moorhead & Moorhead. They worked in collaboration with ArandaLasch who fitted out the interiors. This year’s Designer of the Year, Konstantin Grcic elected to put his installation in the tent-shaded courtyard:  his Netscapes are structurally intense hammocks, swing sets for real swingers, as it were. The morning after opening night, we talked to Granger Moorhead about their tent installation:  “We had to cover a lot of area on a limited budget [$40,000], so we decided to work as much as possible with existing rental tents. We started with those solid vinyl panels that are basically floppy and flat. Then we slit them with an offset pattern and folded them in and out and fixed them with aluminum pop rivets to create tension and to make them volumetric. The openings allowed for light and air and a very pleasant atmosphere for hanging out on the hammocks.” Two tents are set up side by side with the smaller one serving as an open forecourt with partially slit sides to show off the process and the transition,  a favorite Moorhead & Moorhead motif. The larger portion is left untouched. “We started working on it conceptually six months ago but because it’s in a parking lot, it had to go up really fast, in a week and a half,” said Moorhead. He added that the best part of Design Miami so far was finding a Miami edition of the Shake Shack, but with no lines.