Posts tagged with "Miami":

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Miami Architects Add Visual Weight to City’s Major League Soccer Quest

A lack of a viable stadium had been seen as a key hole in Miami's efforts to welcome a Major League Soccer franchise. Now local firm Arquitectonica has stepped in to fill that void, collaborating with 360 Architecture to design a potential waterfront soccer venue. The campaign has a rather dashing face in the form of soccer-star David Beckham, who has provided vocal and financial backing for the plan and apparently played active role in the design concept and siting of the proposed stadium. Beckham asked the architects to embrace the notion of water and beach as key elements of the idea of Miami, a consideration that seems to have manifested itself in the wavy amorphous forms of the building. Arquitectonica principal Bernardo Fort-Brescia sees the stadium as a cog in the ongoing development of the Port of Miami, which was selected from a list of 30 locations under consideration. Hotels and office buildings are other new additions seen flanking the stadium in preliminary renderings. Realization of the team is still a ways away, but co-owner Marcelo Claure set an optimistic 2017 date for an MLS debut. Despite the renderings, a waterfront address is no guarantee as negotiations regarding stadium locale are ongoing with Miami-Dade County and Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez. The city's entry will be preceded by Northern neighbors Orlando, who plan to have the woefully-named Orlando City SC ready to join the league by 2015. New York is also set to welcome a second team next year, though their search for a permanent home has been beset by controversy. Delays may force the team to debut in a temporary venue while more lasting arrangements are made.
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Koolhaas’ Miami Convention Center Plan Sent Back to Drawing Board

New Miami mayor Philip Levine has positioned himself as a major roadblock in the way of OMA's proposed Miami Beach Convention CenterSouth Beach ACE, a team lead by Rem Koolhaas, local developer Robert Wennett, and New York City developer Dan Tishman narrowly edged a design by Bjarke Ingles Group in a hotly contested competition held last year to re-design the campus. Levine has now raised questions about the proposed $1 billion cost of the project and is calling for a new set of candidates offering smaller-scale and more affordable renovation options. On Wednesday, the city officially killed the project. Unsurprisingly, ACE has not reacted well to the news, citing the large sums they invested in winning the initial competition. Their vision for the project included extensive green space and constituted a tempt to more effectively integrate the complex into the surrounding South Beach neighborhood. A curved hotel was placed atop the corner of the building in order to minimize the architectural footprint of the plan. According to the Miami Herald, the city called off ACE's proposal, opting instead to "issue a new bid for just the renovation of the city-owned convention center." A separate project to build a new hotel will also be explored independently.
In addition to the aforementioned figures, convention center specialists tvsdesign were attached to the project, while Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates and Raymond Jungles were brought in to handle landscape design.
Despite the star-power behind the proposal Levine has proved reticent to commit money he feels the city does not currently have in its coffers.  Clearly, the recently elected mayor is yet to see the snazzy promotional video ACE produced to present their concept.
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Zaha Hadid Uses Hologram to Reveal Futuristic Design of Miami’s One Thousand Museum Tower

In the same futuristic spirit of its design, One Thousand Museum, the proposed Zaha Hadid-designed condominium building in Miami, Florida, has recently been rendered in hologram form. As anticipation builds about what will be the Pritzker Prize–winning architect’s first residential building in the United States, Zaha Hadid Architects continued the hype with a Miami party and holographic unveiling of the 705-foot condo tower. According to the South Florida Business Journal, the new digital rendering underscores Hadid’s commitment to curvilinear forms, especially prevalent in this sculptural tower that will soon join the Magic City skyline. Curving exoskeletal ribs over a glazed glass facade define areas of private terraces and balconies, simultaneously creating a space age schematic on the exterior of One Thousand Museum. The facade also gives volume; windows sculpt themselves into three-dimension, a crystalline pattern under the curving web. The condo is designed with luxurious amenities for its residents, including a rooftop spa and wellness center on the wide podium base. Situated in the center of the Miami skyline in Bicentennial Park, a downtown area to be renamed “Museum Park” after the December 4th opening of Herzog & de Meuron’s Perez Art Museum Miami, the tower’s double height glass crown will offer spectacular panoramic views of Museum Park, Biscayne Bay, and the Atlantic Ocean. At the recent Miami gathering, hosted by local celebrity architects Gregg Covin and Louis Birdman in the Covin-designed residential building next door to the One Thousand Museum site, architects from Hadid’s firm were present for questions and mingling with privately invited guests, said the Business Journal. Project director Chris Lepine, lead architect Stephan Wurster, and lead designer Michael Powers represented the company and presented the 3D rendering.
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Developer Taps Starchitects, Baz Luhrmann For Miami Cultural & Residential District

A tired strip along Collins Avenue in Miami, once populated by swanky hotels, will soon be returned to its former glory days. The Miami Herald reported that Argentinian developer Alan Faena is moving forward with his grand vision for this ghostly side of town, dubbed the "Faena District Miami Beach," which will consist of an elaborate mix of residential, hotels, retail, and cultural space. Modeled after his successful transformation of the Puerto Madero district in his hometown of Buenos Aires, this new plan aims to turn this washed up, beachfront stretch into a bustling cultural and residential neighborhood. And to accomplish this, Faena has enlisted the help of big name architects such as Norman FosterRem Koolhaas, and Roman & Williams. The developer just broke ground on the first phase:  A lavish 18-story condo tower designed by Foster + Partners with apartments, ranging from 4,000 to 18,000-square feet in size, and costing up to $50 million. Across the street, Koolhaas' OMA will design a cultural center with a domed auditorium and an underground parking garage with shops on ground floor. The firm will also overhaul the understated Atlantic Beach Hotel and turn it into an open courtyard building for retail. The developer has also purchased the run down Saxony Hotel and asked Roman & Williams to renovate the interior of the historic landmark. And apparently designers aren't the only creatives coming on board this project. Filmmaker Baz Luhrmann—of the flashy, over-the-top productions, such as The Great GatsbyMoulin Rouge, and Romeo and Juliette—will work in some currently-vague capacity, along with his wife Catherine Martin, in what the Herald has called a “creative role’’ at the hotel. Should we expect to find his visual spectacles projected on walls of suites playing to soundtracks by Jay-Z?
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Discover The Biggest Glass in Miami Dade County at Glass+Performance in Atlanta on September 11

Earlier this year, AN assembled a list of the most prominent projects rising in Miami. One of the developments, the Herzog & de Meuron–designed Pérez Art Museum (PAMM, formerly the Miami Art Museum), is nearing completion and is scheduled to open to the public by the end of the year. At The Architects Forum Glass+Performance on September 11th in Atlanta, key participants, including Peter Arbour of seele, Vinu Abraham of Architectural Testing, and Emil Hoogendoorn of John Moriarty & Associates will present on the ambitious design and construction process of the Miami Art Museum facade, calling the endeavor The Biggest Glass in Miami Dade County. Positioned on Museum Park overlooking Biscayne Bay, upon what has been declared the Magic City’s “last big piece of public land downtown,” the new museum’s concrete and glass structure gestures to Stiltsville, a vernacular 1930s form of architecture built on the bay. Various column-free exhibition galleries within the 200,000-square-foot, three-story building accommodate works of differing scales. The museum contains an educational complex, auditorium, and digital workspaces, along with a restaurant and store. Shaded by a canopy, the museum is situated on an elevated plinth open to a landscaped veranda and plazas. The Architects Forum is hosting a session at GlassBuild America filled with short presentations of the design, prototype testing, and construction of the museum's state-of-the-art facade. Arbour, Abraham, and Hoogendoorn will explain the multifaceted and impressive process, focusing on the use of glass as a facade material.  A panel discussion and audience Q+A will take place after the presentation. Register to learn about the process behind the Pérez Art Museum's glass facades and discover more information about Session 3: The Biggest Glass in Miami Dade County: Construction of the Miami Art
 Museum Facades.  
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Zaha Hadid unveils new details about her curvy Miami skyscraper

Miami's development scene has been heating up in the past year with starchitects lining up for a chance to build in the Magic CityZaha Hadid has been equally as hot with several irons in the fire since the last series of renderings for her first U.S. skyscraper, the residential One Thousand Museum tower on the city's waterfront, were unveiled in April. Along with designing a stadium for the 2022 World Cup and the New National Stadium in Japan, she managed to find time to make plans for the already dramatic tower even more extraordinary. New details have recently surfaced on the project's website about the fanciful sculptural structure, detailing the building's sky lounge, aquatic center, and curvy-furniture-stocked lobby, not to mention Miami’s first private helipad placed on a residential complex. Based on earlier renderings, we already knew about many of the building's ultra-luxe amenities, but these newly refined views offer a more refined glimpse of the impressive Aquatic Center and Sky Lounge situated more than 600 feet above the sidewalk on the tower's 60th and 61st floors. Envisaged as a luxurious retreat hovering above the urban environment, the double height space presents stunning panoramic views over Biscayne Bay, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Miami skyline. Sculptural domed walls evocative of water drops and a double-height glass facade encloses the infinity-edge indoor pool. By day the space is bathed with natural light and by night is immersed in the city’s glow refracting off its sculptural form. The new renderings reveal folded glass components at each corner on the top levels that appear as delicately cut jewels. At the tower’s ground level within the podium-like pedestal, the porte-cochère offers privacy from the city streets and a distinguished arrival in line with the cachet of One Thousand Museum. A multi-level wellness and spa center sits atop the porte-cochère and looks over recreational pools and a terrace space pierced by the tower’s curved exoskeleton beams. Construction is set to begin in 2014. All renderings courtesy One Thousand Museum.
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University of Miami Architecture School Dean Steps Down

Prominent planner and architect Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk has stepped down as dean of University of Miami’s (UM) architecture school after an 18-year-long tenure. Plater-Zyberk will continue to teach at UM, whose faculty she joined in 1979. During Plater-Zyberk’s term, UM’s architecture school became closely associated with traditional and Classical design and New Urbanism. The celebrated dean and her husband, planner and architect Andres Duany, are co-founders of Arquitectonica and planners of the pedestrian-friendly Seaside, a Florida panhandle town and setting of the movie Truman Show. Associate Dean Denis Hector will serve as acting dean. Under Plater-Zyberk’s guidance, UM’s fledgling architecture school achieved nationwide recognition as a unique center for classical design and community engagement. The architecture school was just over a decade old when Plater-Zyberk became dean in 1995, and since then she helped the university create “an identity that ran counter to all trends in architectural education at that time,” according to a UM statement. Before becoming dean, she guided UM’s efforts in preparing the 1992 reconstruction of South Miami-Dade County after Hurricane Andrew. She also lead the university in improving Greater Miami through its Center for Urban and Community Design and impressive projects such as a scheme for West Coconut Grove that resulted in the reconstruction of Grand Avenue as a tree-lined, pedestrian-friendly avenue. Plater-Zyberk will continue to leave her mark on the university by focusing her teaching on an up-and-coming aspect of practice: how cities and towns manage the rising seas and further consequences of climate change.
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Bjarke Ingels Bests Koolhaas in First Vote for Miami Beach Convention Center

In the last month, the competition for the Miami Beach Convention Center commission has morphed into an all out, gloves off, battle between two design teams, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and Rem Koolhaas' OMA. The South Florida Business Journal has reported that the Miami Beach Convention Center Advisory Board chose the Portman CMC team—consisting of BIG, CMC Group, Portman Holdings, and West 8—over South Beach ACE in a 4-3 vote on June 18th. But this vote isn't the deciding factor. Next, the Miami Beach Commission will vote on the matter sometime before July 17th. Then it is up to residents to cast their vote for the stand alone convention center plan or the same plan with additional residential and commercial development tacked on.
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Porsche Design Group Breaks Ground on Miami Condo Tower With a Car Elevator

The architectural climate of Miami has been red hot recently, with dozens of towers being built by some of the world’s leading architects—including all-stars Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Bjarke Ingels, and Herzog & de Meuron. And with the city's reputation for high-design parking garages, it's no secret that the Magic City has a soft spot for the automobile. Now, a new designer very familiar with the road aims to break into the Miami sky. The Wall Street Journal reported that Porsche Design Group broke ground in April on a 60-story luxury residential tower, which will feature an automobile elevator allowing each tenant to park their luxury vehicle right beside their living room. The 132-unit tower is Porsche’s first venture into residential development, and it seems to be working out, with half the units already reported sold. The building’s kicker, the car elevator, may already be familiar to Manhattanites since architect Annabelle Selldorf introduced the high-end concept to her 200 Eleventh Avenue tower in 2010. Tenants at the 641-foot, ultra-luxury Porsche Design Tower Miami will be able to pull their cars into the building’s central elevator shaft, ride up to their floor, and park in a “sky-garage” directly connected to their unit—without ever leaving their car. But be prepared to pay for that privilege. Units range from 4,200 to 17,000 square feet and will cost between $4.5 million and $25 million. In addition to the lift, the building will contain other lavish features for lovers of luxury and auto-enthusiasts alike, including a plunge pool, ocean-view ballroom, outdoor kitchens, spas, and a “car concierge” given the duty to monitor and maintain residents’ high-end rides. Even the building’s website is exclusive, forcing users to register to catch a glimpse of the renderings.
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2013 Landmark Miami Competition Announces Winning Entries

Winners are in for the 2013 Landmark Miami competition. In DawnTown's sixth international ideas competition they challenged designers to explore the iconography of cities by creating a new landmark for the future of Miami that could be placed in Bayfront Park. Landmark Miami received over 100 entries from all over the world, including El Salvador, Cuba, Iran, the Philippines, and France. The jury selected three winners plus an honorable mention. 1st Place Project Name: Miami Lift Team Name: Studio Dror Location: New York City From the design team: Miami's extensive beaches, unique culture, and prime location for cruise travel create a cohesive identity, allowing the city itself to be an icon. Miami Lift pays tribute to this by elevating visitors giving them a new perspective of the city. 2nd Place Project Name: Lemonade Square Team Name: REMED Tame Members: David Giraldeau, Alexandre Guilbeault Locations: Montreal From the design team: The concept of Lemonade Square is a perforated platform of 57,600 square feet, floating above the ground. Floating on delicate legs, this museum-like object succeeds at creating superimposed plazas with contemporary characters. The upper level holds giant wading pools and allows people to escape from summer heat. Underneath, a glamorous public place benefits from the surprising sunlight effects and offers to the city a unique contemplative site. 3rd Place Project Name: Torre De Las Americas Team Members: Mauricio Gonzalez, Alfredo Anida Location: Miami/Santiago, Chlie From the design team: The Tower of the Americas is a spatial deluge. It is a vertical flood of platforms that creates an open exhibit that celebrates the diversity of our emergent metropolis. This open tower works with the vertigo of public space. It challenges its visitors as does the Eiffel Tower in Paris. It is a hiking museum. In each one of the platforms different events are generated. The tower is open, thus reducing the resistance to the torque forces generated by the wind. The proposal has a system of Multiple Tunned-Mass-Dampers and very short spans between the chromed columns. This strategy will allow for this tower to be the "tallest-slender tower" building in the world. Honorable Mention Project Name: Great Spirit Woods Team Name: Vojtěch Kolář + VIZarch.cz Team Members: Jakub Frolik & Vojtěch Kolář Location: Brno, Czech Republic From the design team: Great Spirit Woods is located in the southern part of Bayfront Park, which has always been a place of relax and rest. Idea of this proposal is to maintain these values and enrich them. Walking through an artificial forest made of steel columns of a circular cross-section...the highest columns rise up to 500 feet, the whole monumental project also has a function of a lighthouse.
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Glimpse Miami’s Abandoned Marine Stadium and the New Perez Art Museum Miami

Last month AN compiled a list of the most high profile projects taking place in Miami, and on a recent trip to the Magic City, we had the opportunity to visit two of these sites: the shuttered Marine Stadium and Herzog and de Meuron's new building for the Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM). While new developments flood Miami, preservationists are fighting to save and revive the abandoned Marine Stadium on Virginia Key by Cuban-born architect Hilario Candela. In 2009, the graffiti-covered venue that once held powerboat racing events and large-scale concerts, was placed on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s list of “11 Most Endangered Historic Places.” Now that the advocacy group, Friends of Miami Marine Stadium, has won the approval from Miami City Commission for its Virginia Key Master Plan, including the restoration of the 6,566-seat stadium, the next step is winning the approval for the site plan and raising $20 million. When the Miami Art Museum started to outgrow its cramped quarters in Philip Johnson's Miami-Dade Cultural Center, museum officials and board members selected Herzog and de Meuron to design a new building (now dubbed the Perez Art Museum Miami) right on Museum Park overlooking Biscayne Bay, what Jorge Perez, real estate developer and the benefactor of the museum, has said is the "last big piece of public land downtown." "The board wanted a building that was first functional, and not just a piece of sculpture," said Thom Collins, Director of PAMM. The concrete and glass structure is a nod to Stiltsville, a vernacular form of architecture originally built on the bay in the 1930s, and will house a variety of exhibition spaces to accommodate works of different scale. "Our project was principally driven by the recognition of the fact that Miami is becoming a home for contemporary art," said Collins. "Our building now has no room for storage or conservation, or education."
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Unveiled> One Thousand Museum, Zaha Hadid’s first skyscraper in the West

Miami’s real estate market is climbing yet again after a few years of tense halts in new projects following the 2007 recession. Among the towers set to rise in the Magic City's downtown is a residential high-rise designed by  Pritzker prize-winner Zaha Hadid, who is also designing a dramatic parking structure in the city. Expectations of the new structure are soaring, and a set of renderings of the tower have recently been released. Developed by local hotshots Gregg Covin and Louis Birdman, the One Thousand Museum luxury condominium will be built amid a row of existing condo towers along Biscayne Boulevard just across from what will soon be Museum Park. Set to open by 2018, the 62-story residential tower consists of 83 units costing anywhere from $4 to $30 million each. Among the highly luxurious features are a helipad and an amenity deck with multiple pools and cabanas. The units are massive and packed with enough features to entertain any Miami sun worshiper during their indoor moments, such as private elevators, media rooms, midnight kitchens, and libraries. Full-floor units will measure approximately 11,000 square feet each and will be available in two distinct layouts. Half floor units will measure 5,400 square feet and townhouse units will measure 8,600 square feet. One Thousand Museum will be Zaha Hadid’s first skyscraper in the western hemisphere, another feather in the cap of Miami’s star-studded renewal.