Posts tagged with "media bloopers":

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Who Designed These Buildings?

On Friday, the prolific New York Times metro reporter Jennifer 8. Lee, whose beat seems to include everything from fortune cookies to urban planning, covered a new mixed supportive and moderate-income housing development in Harlem, co-developed by the Fortune Society. Unfortunately for the architects involved, she misattributed the design of the project, and of another recent affordable housing development in Harlem, David and Joyce Dinkins Gardens, to the other co-developer, Jonathan Rose Companies.
courtesy Curtis + Ginsberg Architects
Designed by Curtis + Ginsberg Architects, the 114-unit, 110,000 square foot Fortune Society project includes housing for former inmates as well as moderate-income apartments. The eleven story building, which is designed to meet LEED Gold Standards, features a terraced green roof system, a portion of which is accessible, rainwater harvesting, sustainable buildings materials, and sun louvers over the windows, among other green design elements. “It has wonderful views of the Hudson,” said Roberta Darby Curtis, principal at Curtis + Ginsberg. “For people who have been incarcerated, having access to the outdoors is that much more important,” Mark Ginsberg, the other principal, told AN.
courtesy Dattner Architects
Dinkins Gardens, completed last year, was designed by Dattner Architects, and was also co-developed by Rose. It also includes affordable housing and is topped with green roof. Though the mistake was surely unintentional, the developers, and the architects, behind these projects deserve credit for these cost effective, environmentally and socially responsive projects.
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Pricking PIN-UP

Like its architecture/fashion/porn mix or not, PIN-UP doesn’t seem like a magazine that takes itself too seriously. Neither does AN, of course, but we do strive for accuracy (even if we sometimes miss!). So in that vein, we feel obliged to point out a small error on their part. In their Fall/Winter 08/09 issue, as a part of a tribute to the late critic Herbert Muschamp, PIN-UP ran “never-before-published” emails between then Guggenheim director Lisa Dennison and Muschamp, in which he proposed a series of new exhibitions for the museum. Sound familiar? Piranesi? Antinous? Any bells? Dedicated AN readers may recall that edited versions of these very proposals were published in our issue #5 in 2008 [AN 05_03.19.2008, p. 22 (pdf)], eight months prior to PIN-UP. When confronted, editor Felix Burrichter wrote by email, “Caught! I remember reading about the Times memorial and Lisa’s speech in AN, but I must have overlooked the actual correspondence in edited form… so I guess it was not much of an exclusive, after all.” No worries, Felix. We’ll stick to breaking news. You stick to topless centerfolds and architects in S&M gear.
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Lost in Translation

While searching for competitions on a number of architecture websites, I came across a misleading description of an international competition in Madrid, Spain, sponsored by the COAM (Colegio Oficial de Arquitectos de Madrid). English-language sites are promoting a “Solar City” competition that would deal with “solar intervention strategies for temporary use in an artistic, architectural development, particularly in neighborhood involvement,” according to one. What does “solar intervention” mean? Using solar panels? Smarter orientation of buildings? Funnily enough the whole purpose of the competition is twisted by a bad translation, since “solar” in Spanish means “site,” and has nothing to do with our astro rey, the Sun. The competition, in fact, is about proposing temporary uses for urban sites, and might more correctly be translated as, “Ideas for the Development and Temporary Use of Urban Gaps.” The real objective is to identify spaces in the urban grid that have been abandoned after a demolition or remain undeveloped or inactive, which could be reprogrammed for temporary community uses and to design strategies for reuse. Jokes aside, it would be a shame if English-speaking competitors miss the point of this interesting brief. Check out or competitions page for up to date (and, we hope, correctly translated) information.