Posts tagged with "Marcus Garvey Park":

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Studio Museum ventures into Marcus Garvey Park with new Maren Hassinger sculptures

This June, The Studio Museum in Harlem will be unveiling a new series of sculptures in Marcus Garvey Park by multidisciplinary artist and Harlem resident Maren Hassinger. Maren Hassinger: Monuments, which was organized by The Studio Museum in partnership with the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance and NYC Parks, will present eight site-specific public sculptures that will be on view for nearly a year. The eight sculptures will use branches bent and shaped into mounds, rings, cubes, and other shapes that respond to the park landscape and its existing forms. Not merely installed in Hassinger’s own neighborhood, the sculptures will also be made with the help of her neighbors, including local volunteers and participants from the Studio Museum’s Teen Leadership Council and Expanding the Walls program. Monuments will be a project made in Harlem, for Harlem. This is part of the museum’s broader inHarlem initiative which, since 2016, focuses on collaborations, exhibitions, conversations, workshops, and more offsite in the museum’s neighborhood As Hallie Ringle, who is the exhibition’s organizer and Assistant Curator at The Studio Museum, explained, “We’re reaching across the generations, and across both indoor and outdoor space, to present these projects...These new inHarlem exhibitions touch on themes of community, creative energy, respect for the earth, and histories both told and untold.” Hassinger, who is also the Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at Maryland Institute College of Art, rose to prominence in the 1970s for sculptures that draw from her background in fiber arts, dance, and performance, and that blend natural and industrial materials and forms. She is also renowned for her performances and videos and many early collaborations with artist Senga Nengudi. Maren Hassinger: Monuments Marcus Garvey Park, New York, NY June 16, 2018–June 10, 2019
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Scott Stringer to Give Harlem’s Historic Fire Watchtower an Expensive Makeover

Earlier this week, Manhattan Borough President and City Controller candidate Scott Stringer announced his $1 million pledge to restore a historic Harlem fire watchtower at the heart of Marcus Garvey Park. In the 19th century, the 47-foot tower served as a lookout point and the bell was raised in case of imminent danger. Today, the tower no longer protects the community but threatens it, showing substantial signs of decay and neglect. Running a tight race against Eliot Spitzer, Stringer lags behind the former governor in terms of African American votes and is thus seeking to salvage one of the community’s most valued landmarks. The past few days, he has generated good publicity from his ability and desire to fund this restoration project.The $1 million provided by Stringer, along with the $1.75 million contributed by Councilmember Inez Dickens and $1.25 million by Mayor Bloomberg will be used to preserve the tower. The project includes a full restoration of the tower’s cast-iron structure, the removal of deficient parts, and the additional construction of a stainless steel support system. As the 157-year-old tower continues to deteriorate, with parts of it falling from its structure each day, Stringer assures that the restoration project will contribute to a safer environment for Harlem inhabitants. Stringer plans on working collaboratively with the Mayor’s Office, the Department of Parks and Recreation, the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance, and the Mount Morris Community Improvement Association in order to protect a historic component of Harlem’s culture and history. The fire tower is the only surviving one of eleven cast-iron watchtowers placed throughout New York City since the 1850s. The project will ensure the preservation of one of the city’s most treasured historical remnants and will ultimately lead to a safer environment within the Harlem community.