Posts tagged with "Marc Newson":

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Specsheet> Whimsical children’s furniture

From child-sized designer furniture to customized outdoor seating, this jamboree of unique children’s furnishings puts play at the forefront of design. Bunky by Marc Newson Magis Bunky’s design combines fun, privacy, and safety to create an environment where kids can have a space of their own and, obviously, sleep. Made from rotational-molded polyethylene, it is assembled from just four pieces and is available as a children’s single bed. All surfaces are smooth with no sharp edges, and the material is highly durable and easy to clean. Standard Sway Stool by Daniel Michalik kinder MODERN Balancing motion with function, this stool is made from a single block of recycled cork. A special pattern is cut into all four sides, causing the seat to rock and pivot under the weight of body movement. Sitting actively improves the sitter’s posture by the act of maintaining balance. Lou Lou Ghost and Tip Top by Philippe Starck Kartell Philippe Starck’s iconic Louis Ghost Chair and TipTip side table were made into their respective child-sized versions. Just like Louis, the Lou Lou Ghost is made of durable polycarbonate, making it scratch-resistant, stackable, and easy to clean. Meanwhile, the TipTip kid’s round top has a single base that combines a colored top with a hollow transparent leg. Together, they can be used both indoors and outdoors. K desk RaFa-kids This kid’s desk resembles the letter K when seen from the side. The design features rounded corners and a lid that opens to reveal an interior tabletop. The K desk can be used for working or hiding little treasures in the underside of a lid that doubles as a place to pin drawings or photos.   Downtown by Oiva Toikka Magis Magis imagined a square shelving unit that features five setback tiers, a pointed top roof, and legs. Along the sides, recessed squares mimic the shape of windows. The skyscraper-shaped form is molded in polyethylene, making it suitable for both outdoor and indoor use. Adada Rocking Horse Fermob USA Fermob makes the Adada Rocking Horse out of the aluminum leftover from producing other furniture. It has a lightweight frame outfitted with plastic pads on the base to let children rock away indoors or out without scratching the floor.
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Product> Above the Ordinary: Best Bath Fixtures and Fittings

Including an architect-designed element in the bath can elevate the look of the room without breaking the client's budget. Whether a suite of fixtures or a single item, it's an added-value investment. Starck 1 Washbasin Duravit This modern washbasin features a unique faucet hole that is nearly impossible to machine fabricate. The faucet surround of the sink is hand-sanded to create an entirely flat surface on the top and sides of the hole, resulting in a unique appearance. Armonia Console Antonio Lupi Sleekly carved in American walnut, the frame of this console exhibits influences from both mid-century sources and Art Nouveau in its light, fluid lines. Designed by Roberto Lazzeroni. Onda Vanity Hastings Tile & Bath The Onda collection combines curves and colors in almost infinite arrangements. The vanities are available in 36 matte or gloss colors or a natural oak finish. Finishes can be mixed within the same vanity; curves can be parallel or asymmetrical. Tops are offered in 36 glass colors and nine solid surface options. In 60 cm, 90cm, and 105 cm sizes. Beyond Crystal THG The Beyond Crystal collection comprises fittings and accessories that feature Baccarat crystal handles in a contemporary rectangular form. The fittings are illuminated by dimmable LED lights. Available in colors as well as clear crystal, the line includes tub fillers and shower sets. Designed by Rémi Tessier. Marc Newson Linear Drain Infinity Drain For zero-threshold applications, these 14-gauge stainless steel grates have a fixed flange that siplifies installation. Available in five finishes. Designed by Marc Newson. Living Square Washbasin Laufen A proprietary new ceramic material, named SaphirKeramik, has been developed with remarkable properties that directly impact design. Its flexural strength, for example, has been measured at 120kp/sq. mm, which is comparable to steel, and twice as high as that of vitreous china. The hardness of the recyclable material enables the creation of extremely thin (1-2mm) walls and tight corner radii (2mm) that characterize modern design.
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On View> “Marc Newson: At Home” Opens on November 23 at The Philadelphia Museum of Art

Nearly three decades after he was launched into design stardom by his biomorphic, aluminum Lockhead Lounge (above), famed Australian industrial designer Marc Newson will soon receive his first solo museum exhibition in the United States. Presented by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, "Marc Newson: At Home" will collect furniture, clothing, appliances, and Newsons’ 021C Ford concept car within a mock, six-room home in the museum’s Collab Gallery. Gathered from collections across Europe, Japan, and the United States, in addition to Newson’s personal cache, the objects on display will highlight the various facets of the designer’s distinctive style of flowing lines, bulbous forms, bright colors, and industrial references which helped to define an era of industrial design. The exhibition opens November 23rd and runs until April 20, 2014. Newson's signature riveted chaise lounge, both one of his most recognizable and rarest works, will be exhibited in the living room along side the matching, cello-shaped Pod of Drawers (1987), Super Guppy lamp (1987), and honeycombed, marble Voronoi Low Shelf (2008), among other works. The kitchen will contain a more attainable collection, including the curving, plastic Dish Doctor dish rack (1997), dinnerware by Noritake, glassware by Iitalla, cutlery from Alessi, and the Champagne Coffret Magnum (2006) for Don Pérignon. Newson's playful forms and vibrant colors take hold of the children's room, wherein the classic, three-legged Embryo Chair (1988), modular, plastic Bunky Bunk Beds (2010), and "Rocky" Rocking Horse create a vibrant, Jetsonian environment. To catch a glimpse of some Newson-designed clothing from G-Star, head over to the adult bedroom, which will also contain the retro Nimrod chair (2003) and transparent Atmos clock for Swiss watchmakers Jaeger LeCoultre (2008). The minimalist, streamlined Wall Hung "Invisi II" Toilet and Wash Basin (2012) take center stage in Newson's bathroom, while the 021C concept car, designed for Ford and exhibited at the Tokyo Auto Show in 1999, is housed within the garage.
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MAD Museum gets Out of Hand

A cross-section of postdigital design work illustrates the role of parametrics in the built environment.

Spawned from his 2011 show on Patrick Jouin, Museum of Arts & Design (MAD) curator Ronald Labaco conceived Out of Hand as a more comprehensive show that clarified the role of digital design, from its capabilities to its significance in our daily lives. “People just didn’t get it,” said Labaco of Jouin’s 2011 MAD show. “Unless you’re immersed in it, it can be hard to understand so I thought if we showed something like this in the galleries again, we needed to provide information that can be digested more clearly.” Staged across three floors of the museum, with two exterior sculptures, Labaco said the show is an important program for MAD among other New York art institutions like MoMA, Cooper Hewitt, and the New Museum. The goal to raise awareness of 3D printing is timely, by chance. “Paolo Antonelli’s Design and the Elastic Mind, and two shows from Material Connection were complements to my show for the uninitiated,” Labaco explained. Out of Hand’s broad scope includes digital designing and fabrication processes like CNC milling, digital weaving and knitting, laser cutting, and 3D printing to display how these technologies influence the built environment. “It’s a historical look at the last 8 years and works from as early as 2005 are incorporated because, in my mind, that was when the major shift between rapid prototyping and 3D printing really occurred,” said Labaco.
  • Curator Ronald Labaco
  • Location Museum of Arts & Design, New York
  • Date October 2013– July 2014
  • Materials ceramic, concrete, polyurethane, resin, PVC, metal, gypsum, wax, paper, wood, jacquard
  • Process water jet cutting, laser cutting, laser sintering, 3D printing, digital weaving
Organized in six themes, a cross-section of traditional methods and new design capabilities are illustrated by architects crafting art, artists doing design, and photographers making sculpture. Approximately half a dozen pieces were commissioned for the show while others were an extension of existing works: For example, a chair by Jan Habraken evolved into the more comprehensive Charigenics. Placards for each piece call out production methods, from 3D printing (10 materials are featured) to digital knitting, underscoring the multi-step creation process to make the point that digital design isn’t only press-and-print. And many of the show’s pieces are a combination of old-world handcrafting and newer digital geometries and computations. Pieces like Rapid Racer, Bosch’s 3D-printed vehicle fabricated over 10 days and weighing just 29 pounds, and Zaha Hadid’s Liquid Glacial "Smoke", a coffee table CNC-milled from polished plexiglass, illustrate the functional role of digital design. Data input is actively incorporated through two interactive pieces from Francios Brument, for which he developed his own scripting, as well as a Shapeways workshop that is open to the public. Traditional forms are realized by new methods in Nendo’s 3D-printed paper boxes that are lacquered with traditional urushi for a ringed faux bois. Other featured artists, architects, and designers include Richard DuPont, Greg Lynn, Anish Kapoor, Marc Newson, Frank Stella, Daniel Libeskind, and Maya Lin. Just as dynamic as the digital disciplines themselves, new pieces are being added throughout the show’s run. Look for a new piece from Iris Van Herpen by mid-November. Out of Hand will remain on view through July 6, 2014.