Posts tagged with "Maps":

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This interactive map lets you explore Manhattan’s skyscraper history in 3D

Publicly accessible data maps on New York's buildings is nothing new, however, an easy-to-navigate three dimensional one is. While Google Maps and others provide accurate visuals, the "Manhattan Skyscraper Explorer," developed by Raluca Nicola, allows users to navigate with ease by sorting buildings into 25-year segments. As a result, it is easy to see the buildings constructed between 1950 and 1975 with the click of a button. Using ArcGIS API for JavaScript (software that allows three-dimensional applications to be powered by web-generated scenes with toggle-able layers), Nicola was able to make a light-weight tool for navigating Manhattan's architecture. "I started by coloring the buildings based on the time period they were built in. This way I could identify the areas with newer or older buildings, discover which buildings were built in the same period or see that in some neighbourhoods like Soho most of the buildings were built before 1925," Nicola explained in a blog post. "Then I was curious to correlate construction year and height, so I built a timeline with Y axis representing the height. In this timeline each building is a circle with the color given by the construction period. It was interesting to confirm that fewer skyscrapers were built during the Great Depression and almost none during World War II." Inside the map, users can scroll to zoom in and out as well as pan by clicking and dragging. When selected, buildings come with images and a short synopsis. Wikipedia API (called MediaWiki) and the Flickr API were used to load images—famous buildings having their own wiki page helped with this. Furthermore, being color coded, spotting the era of a building is easy. Likewise, buildings over or under a certain height can be selected to further narrow scope. Searching directly for a building can also be done too. To find out more about how Nicola built the platform, read the blog post here. The map itself can be found here.
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Announcing a whole new way to discover stories about your city, region, or neighborhood

Have you ever walked by a new construction site and wondered what's being built? Spotted a striking storefront and wanted to know who designed it? Perhaps you'd be alarmed to discover your favorite park is at risk? At The Architect's Newspaper (AN), we're obsessed with covering the most important stories on the built environment, whether it's a mega project or a thoughtful change to a small plaza. Now you can discover our articles based on your location at any given moment. AN has partnered with Hoverpin, a free app that helps users find new people, places, and events, to make this possible. Here's how it works:
  1. Open Facebook's Messenger app on your phone. (If you don't have an iPhone, Messenger is free to download. The app requires you to have a Facebook account.)
  2. In the "Search" bar at the top, type "The Architect's Newspaper."
  3. AN's blue, circular icon should appear—click on it.
  4. Tap "Get Started" for a quick tour, then click "Explore."
  5. Select "Your location"—you'll be asked to send your location. You can adjust your pin on the map if you like. Tap the small, blue arrow once you're ready.
After you send your location, a number of articles will appear, each one relating to a site near you. Each "pin" links to the full article on AN's website. You can also view the project's exact location on a map or share the story others. Curious about a specific city? Just tap "Send a message" then enter the city's name (e.g. Philadelphia). We have over 250 articles available on this Messenger app, so while not every location will have relevant articles, our database grows every day. (A note to our international readers—at the moment, our pins are primarily in the U.S.) Want to explore our archive on your desktop? Visit the Messenger app's desktop version and repeat the steps above; the "Search" bar is at the top left of the page and features a small magnifying glass icon. You can also find all of our "pins" on this easy-to-navigate map. If you'd like to send a regular message through the app, just tap "Contact Us" and we'll respond as quickly as possible. Have questions or comments? Please let us know below or email info[at]archpaper.com!
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This group is mapping the perils and shortcomings of the Dakota Access Pipeline

[UPDATE 6/15/2017: A federal judge has issued a ruling that states DAPL's permits violated the law. Read more here.] Amid protest, the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) opened last week, funneling 450,000 barrels of oil daily from North Dakota to southern Illinois. Over a distance equal to the drive between New York and Kansas City, its 1,172 miles traverse Native American reservations and private land, multiple watersheds, and skirt large cities. An anonymous cohort of designers, working under the name Alma and Friends, is mapping the effects and missed opportunities surrounding the $3.8 billion pipeline. The group built the maps on their own time (more than 200 hours of it) using GIS data. Richly detailed, the maps depict indigenous land, nucleated human settlement, watersheds, and sites of past and potential future oil spills (from May 2016 to May 2017, there were 745 oil spills in North Dakota). Los Angeles–based public television station KCET is running a series on the impact of the DAPL, where users can interact with the maps. h/t Mapping DAPL [Landscape Architecture Magazine]
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New app transports you through NYC’s historic cityscape with archival photos

Finally, a digital archive of historic New York City photos that geolocates to your smartphone! This new app mines the digital collections of three NYC cultural institutions, placing the images onto an interactive map of the city. Working with Brooklyn Historical Society, the New York Public Library, and the Museum of the City of New York, Urban Archive has made accessible over 2,500 images from all five boroughs (sorry New Jersey). The newly formed nonprofit's ambition is to create apertures into the city’s urban history in a multi-dimensional digital platform that both informs and entertains the public.  This democratization of images has the potential to allow communities to articulate untold urban histories in a new forum of public engagement. The app has a sophisticated interface that, among other features, sends push notifications when you walk pass a historic building, giving new agency to urban explorers and history enthusiasts. The app also has curated walking tours of certain neighborhoods and a popular side-by-side photo generator that produces images you can share on social media. To "check-in," you need to be within 150 feet of the chosen location. "Certain check-ins may unlock achievements within the app, so no short cuts are allowed!" Urban Archive says on their website. While the available database is still in beta testing, Urban Archive continues to sort and geotag some 50,000 additional images, encouraging other institutions to share their collections. The Urban Archive iOS app requires an iPhone running iOS 10 or later. No iPad or Android versions are available yet.
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Travel through space-time with the NYPL’s new map tool

The past few months have been a blessing to New York City map lovers: Cartography fiends can browse future skyscrapers, prepare for L-mageddon, and discover the city's noisiest neighborhoods or hidden civil rights histories. Now, the New York Public Library (NYPL) has unveiled what could be—for history nerds, at least—the mother of all maps: The NYC Space/Time Directory, a “digital time-travel service" that combines the library's map collection with geospatial tools to illuminate the city's messy and beautiful development over more than a century. The project's first map takes 5,000 street maps from across the city and folds them into one interactive database that spans a century, from 1850–1950. Maps by Decade aggregates maps from the NYPL collection, an improvement on the library's previous georectification tool, the Map Warper. The NYC Space/Time Directory, which includes more than 8,000 maps and 40,000 geo-referenced photos and counting, is supported by a grant from the Knight Foundation. Ready to time travel? A click on The Architect's Newspaper's home neighborhood of Tribeca shows six maps from 165 years ago. The user can transpose a ward map from 1852 onto present-day streets, or view the same map in the NYPL's digital collections, or take the map for a spin in the Map Warper, below: Better yet, the project is all open source. Users can access each map's geospatial data, and the source code for Maps by Decade is on GitHub. For those who wish to collaborate on more mapping projects, Hyperallergic reports that NYPL’s Space/Time Directory Engineer Bert Spaan is organizing IRL meetups around the city to make more maps using the library's resources.
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DOT releases first-ever noise map of the United States

The U.S. Department of Transportation has released its first map of all the noise made by cars and airplanes across the United States. Though airports, ambulances, garbage pickup, and the neighbor's sweet new sound system can cost us our hearing (and sanity), most U.S. residents live in safe noise zones. But some people, mostly city-dwellers, may have cause for concern around their exposure to constant, too-loud sounds.

The National Transportation Noise Map shows that almost all U.S. residents—97 percent—hear background noise from highways and planes overhead at a safe 50 decibels, about equal to a humming refrigerator. A small fraction of citizens, though, hear noise equivalent to a garbage truck every day. Less than one-tenth of one percent of U.S. residents (approximately 223,000 people) hear 80 or more decibels on a regular basis. Sustained exposure to 85 or more decibels—heavy city traffic—can cause permanent hearing loss over time. In the New York metro area, pictured above, residents living near the region's airports or under flight paths are at greatest risk for unhealthy noise exposure. The U.S. DOT's Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) compiled and analyzed data for the Noise Map, which is meant to help agencies track transit-related noise at the state and local levels. Officials can use the information to implement policies that reduce transit noise. The layers, which now include data up to 2014, will be updated annually and may eventually include noise data from rail and ships. The Noise Map is part of the U.S. DOT's National Transportation Atlas Database (NTAD), a collection of publicly-available infrastructure data.
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New interactive 3-D map visualizes Downtown Manhattan’s future

Launched by the Alliance for Downtown New York, a free interactive 3-D map (dubbed LM3D) uses real-time data to show all current and development projects one-square-mile south of Chamber Street. Although it may seem very specific, Lower Manhattan is the third largest central business district in the United States. The map will display all residential, office, retail, and hospitality developments, as well as open space and transit. Users can view information on individual buildings, select specific areas to learn about land use, building and unit counts, identify key corridors, see upcoming developments, and sort between residential, hotel, office, transportation, institutional, retail, and restaurant services. By the end of the year, LM3D should also provide historic data on the area’s development. The map is in beta and currently accessible through the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, or Safari browsers. Learn more by watching this how-to video:
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This new transit map will help you prepare for the L train shutdown

More than a quarter-million people take the L train to get to and from Manhattan everyday, but riders are already bracing for that fateful day when the line's underwater tunnel closes for crucial repairs in 2019. In response to the shutdown, a group of New Yorkers are taking post–L train survival into their own hands with a new interactive map that may help all of us travel a little smarter.

In collaboration with transit advocacy group Transportation Alternatives, Google's New York–based Sidewalk Labs has put together an interactive map to illustrate how the L train shutdown will impact riders across the system. Now in beta, NYC Transit Explorer reveals transit access visually, encouraging New Yorkers to think more broadly about how to get around. Here's how it works: The map aggregates the MTA's GTFS feeds for subways, buses, and the Staten Island Ferry to ascertain how long it would take to get to point A to B or point B from A, C, D, and E. NYC Transit Explorer allows users to tweak the variables to their liking—if a bus-loving Queens-to-Brooklyn rider prefers to walk fewer than ten minutes at any given point in the trip, she can adjust variables to access the most surface transit possible, while a Bronx-to-Manhattan rush hour commuter might prefer the faster subway. The map depicts travel time on a gradient from each location, and it allows you to compare travel times to the same destination via a bus-only, subway-only or combination routes. Best yet, users can see, via a time gradient, how long it would take to get from two different points. If a person is moving, for example, he can plot his commute from his current home and get a sense of where he could relocate to preserve the same (or shorter) travel time. Looking towards the future, the map also allows users to see commutes without the L train, or with the newly-opened Second Avenue subway. Sidewalk Labs' handy video offers an explainer and how-to for getting around New York faster: For those whose map skills start and end with Google Maps, some of the Transit Explorer's features are less than intuitive. Addresses are added through a pin drop, while minor streets remain unlabeled even in the closest zoom. Nevertheless, the map reveals transit deserts and hubs outside the city center (hello, Jamaica) and could be a useful tool for L-train dependent Brooklynites wondering how they'll get to the city when their train powers down.
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How old are the buildings in your area? A new interactive map might tell you

As part of its ReUrbanism initiative, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has produced interactive maps which chart the age and character of cities across the United States. The Atlas of ReUrbanism is meant to be a new tool for urbanists and advocates, one that better utilizes massive amounts of data on the age of cities. Along with the interactive map, the report draws connections between the physical character of cities and social, economic, and environmental concerns. Used together, the report and maps help give a complex understanding of American cities. The maps highlight the median age of buildings and the size of buildings and parcels. Information is distilled into 200-by-200-meter squares and color coded. The atlas gives each grid square a Character Score, which is a function of its buildings' sizes and ages. This score can be compared to other measurable quantities, such as economic growth, to better understand the impact of older buildings within the city fabric. Other layers in the maps include National Historic Landmarks, City Landmarks, and National Historic Districts. The National Trust’s Preservation Green Lab has led the development of the maps. Information was gathered from the sources such as the U.S. Census and the American Community Survey. Currently, maps for 10 cities have been released, including New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Buffalo, Detroit, Chicago, Louisville, Houston, Los Angeles, and Portland. Forty other cities were included in the study and will be added to the collection of maps. The Preservation Green Lab is an initiative that works to find new uses for old buildings. The lab is based on the belief that the continued use of older buildings is a key to creating sustainable, equitable, and affordable cities. By conducting research and creating tools, the lab hopes to bring together different urban stakeholders to encourage economic development through the use of existing and underutilized spaces and buildings.
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This interactive map lets you see what buildings are rising in your neighborhood

From tenements to today's skyscrapers, adequate light and air are essential to a livable New York. The city's first zoning code enshrined access to these elements, and now, with supertalls ringing Central Park and cropping up in downtown Brooklyn, sunlight and fresh air are again central considerations in debates around the city's current and future form. To keep tabs on the dizzying array of new construction (supertall and less so) in New York, DNAinfo has put together an interactive 3D map that lets residents track development in their neighborhoods. "How Tall Will New Buildings in My NYC Neighborhood Be?" highlights buildings in two main categories. The first, in turquoise, maps permitted construction, while the second, in royal blue, illustrates proposed buildings—those that have been presented to the community, but haven't been approved by the city. Yellow boxes represent DNAinfo partners, and users are encouraged to add projects the paper hasn't reported on (these items appear on the map in red). The volumes depict height (not design) as reported by the city, the developer, or other relevant agency. The map asks users to enter a neighborhood to see new buildings are going up. This reporter zeroed in on Tribeca, The Architect's Newspaper's home base, and selected a proposed structure on Park Row. Hovering over the rectangle revealed a DNAinfo story on the building, which is being developed by L+M. Other items that are going up but haven't been written about by the outlet have links to DOB documents or information that corroborates the building's height. Here are the sexy details: The paper used the city's MapPluto for the base map, which combines tax lot–level data from the Department of City Planning with data from the Department of Finance's Digital Tax Map. Building heights are calculated using the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat's formula, and all data is September 2016.
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Just when we need it most, a new map charts social justice history in lower Manhattan

To ring in 2017 right, a New York–based preservation advocacy group has created a map that could change the way we see lower Manhattan. The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP) this week debuted its Civil Rights & Social Justice Map, an interactive tool that reveals key downtown sites where women, LGBT people, immigrants, Latinos, and African-Americans have fought for equity, dignity, and representation. Covering its home base, Greenwich Village, as well as the East Village and Noho, the map features places and short blurbs about homes of well-known activists, streets, gathering spaces, and houses of worship. The map draws on the success of the recently-declared Sullivan-Thompson Historic District, which the GVSHP advocated for vigorously. Preservationists are the first to say that the district, also referred to as South Village, is architecturally rich, but its cultural history is just as important. In its designation the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) noted that the rowhouses and tenements illuminate the Italian-American immigrant experience in New York, among other group. The new map, below, pins 100 locations and counting: In addition to famous sites like the National Register–listed Stonewall Inn, the map depicts some of the city's first African-American churches, anarchist Emma Goldman's house, and the Charas-El Bohio Community Center, which served Puerto Rican residents and which neighbors are trying to revive once again. GVSHP intends to update the map "regularly"—if an important site is not listed, readers can email info@gvshp.org with information and sources for consideration.
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New online map reveals wealth of underused land in NYC

The Municipal Art Society of New York (MAS) has debuted an interactive mapping tool that uses public information to display thousands of city-owned and -leased parcels. Viewed as a whole, the maps reveal a hidden geography of underutilized assets that comprise a land area the size of Brooklyn. The MAS Public Assets: City‐Owned and Leased Properties (Public Assets) report subdivides 14,000 properties (43,000 acres) citywide by key land use issues: infrastructure, landmarks, the environment, rezonings, and population. Remarkably, the city classifies an area roughly double the size of Central Park as having "no current use." The full report can be accessed here. "City-owned means citizen-owned; New Yorkers deserve to know that we collectively carry the cost, but also potential profit, on land holdings as large as Brooklyn," said Gina Pollara, president of MAS, in a statement. “These findings raise serious questions about whether our city's available property is being appropriately leveraged for civic benefit. True equity in the city’s planning and land use decisions can only be achieved through an informed and engaged public.” 64 percent of the properties are within the 100-year floodplain, and 247 are state targets of environmental remediation. Consequently, MAS is asking the city to implement flood-protection measures for the properties, take care of the landmarks, and make better use of its assets in low-income, low-density, rezoned areas, and areas eligible for rezoning. Using information from the New York City: MapPLUTOTM V15.1. and City Owned and Leased Properties 2014 (COLP dataset), MAS charted agency control; property for lease or sale; zoning regulations and development potential; and current uses of the city's land (subdivided into current use and underutilized). MapPLUTOTM has information on land use and at a tax lot level, while the COLP dataset draws from the Integrated Property Information System (IPIS), a real estate database run by the Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS). More information on the maps can be found here.