Posts tagged with "Manica Architecture":

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Raiders’ Las Vegas stadium clears final hurdle

Today the Raiders inked a deal that allows for construction to proceed on their 65,000-seat, Manica Architecture–designed stadium in Las Vegas. Raiders President Marc Badain and Steve Hill, chairman of the Las Vegas Stadium Authority, the public entity that facilities the construction and financing of the project, agreed to a deal that allows the $1.8 billion project to move forward. With that, the Raiders are cleared to move from their current home in Oakland, California, to their new digs in the Nevada desert. So far, the team has spent $180 million on the stadium, a figure that includes preliminary site work and last year's $77.5 million purchase of the 62-acre property. At the meeting in Orlando yesterday, NFL owners okayed a $200 million league loan that will finance the construction, with only one of the league's 32 owners voting against the deal. On the public side, the Las Vegas Sun reported that Clark County (which includes Las Vegas) will direct $750 million in hotel room tax revenue towards the project. In a Q&A posted on the Raiders website, owner Mark Davis expounded on the stadium design, comparing it favorably to the stadium the team almost occupied in California:
"I think it’s an iconic building, number one. It’s something that… the basic structure of it and everything has brought the dynamic back to what we were doing with the Carson building with the Chargers. I just fell in love with the architectural design of it. To adapt that building that we did for Carson, put a roof on it… to come out with glass, which has always been a prerequisite for me. To get that aspect done, I think building looks fantastic. Just excited that the Raiders will have a home. Something the fans can be proud of, the league can be proud of, the players can be proud of..."
The Las Vegas Review-Journal reported that construction is expected to be finished by August 1, 2020, about a month before the regular season begins.
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$1.9 billion Las Vegas Raiders stadium clears penultimate hurdle as public funding deal is approved

The odds for the Oakland Raiders football team’s relocation to Las Vegas are looking very good right about now. Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval signed a bill into law this week that would set aside $1.15 billion in public funds to build two new mega-projects in Las Vegas: a new Manica Architecturedesigned Las Vegas Raiders stadium and a large-scale upgrade to the Las Vegas Convention Center. In the deal, the stadium would get $750 million in funding with the remainder going toward the convention center project. Nevada lawmakers narrowly approved the bill in a special legislative session last week, capping off several months of deal-making and buzz for the nearly $2 billion project. Of the remaining sum, local billionaire Sheldon Adelson intends to contribute $650 million in funding, with the team putting roughly $500 million toward the project. Manica Architecture’s proposal for the 65,000-seat stadium has been mostly repurposed from the team’s failed bid to relocate to Los Angeles and features a large, retractable roof canopy. The arena would be located on one of two sites, both adjacent to Interstate-15 and the Mandalay Bay casino towers. One of the proposed sites is located on top of what is currently a portion of the Bali Hai Golf Club. The deal marks the largest amount ever in terms of sheer dollars that a municipality has provided to subsidize the building of a National Football League (NFL) franchise stadium. Construction Dive reports that several concessions were made in order to have the legislature approve the deal, including increasing the amount of access the University of Nevada, Las Vegas would have to the stadium and providing a different rental rate to the university for access to the facilities. In a boastful ceremony marking the signing of the bill, the Sandoval cited inter-city competition as a driver for the funding plan, stating, “Cities such as New York and Chicago and Seattle, they have not only stadiums and major sports franchises, but are also investing over a billion dollars per year in their respective convention centers.” Sandoval’s approval marks the penultimate step in the Raiders’ bid to build a new stadium for the franchise. In order for the move to become officially-sanctioned, two-thirds of current NFL franchise owners would have to agree to allow the team to relocate in an upcoming meeting scheduled for January 2017.
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Las Vegas Raiders stadium one step closer to reality

Las Vegas is one step closer to getting its own football team and stadium. Yesterday, The Southern Nevada Tourism Infrastructure Committee (SNTIC) unanimously approved a bid for $750 million in public funding for the Manica Architecture-designed project. The decision infuses the itinerant team and it's stadium with a higher potential for realization, but there are still many questions to be answered. SNTIC’s support punts the stadium issue over to Nevada’s Republican Governor Brian Sandoval, who must now convene a special legislative session to approve the funding request. Public financing for the project would be a contingent on the legislature increasing the Clark County hotel tax, perhaps a difficult proposition in a Republican-leaning state where the governor is up for reelection. In a statement released by the governor, Sandoval pledged to hold off deliberating on the matter “until all questions have been resolved,” adding “Nevada has served as the standard bearer for global tourism, gaming, and conventions for decades. In order to remain the top destination, we must explore potential opportunities and push forward to lead this international industry into the next generation of travel and tourism. I am hopeful the work completed by this committee will serve as a roadmap to Southern Nevada’s unrivaled and continued success.” Manica Architecture’s proposal for the stadium, transplanted from an earlier, failed bid the Raiders made for a new home in Los Angeles, is projected to cost nearly $2 billion. Developers for the project consider the $750 million in public funding essential to building the stadium and bringing the team from Oakland to Sin City. The stadium proposal features a massive, retractable roof canopy that would shield the stadium’s 65,000 spectators from the blazing desert heat and aims to connect with the adjacent Mandalay Bay casino and the remainder of the Las Vegas Strip. The final site within the city for the potential stadium to occupy, however, is yet to be finalized. The team is eyeing two adjacent lots hugging Interstate 15: A compact scheme to the west of the Mandalay Bay casino towers, and another, more expansive one to their south. The southern scheme would require partial demolition of the Bali Hai Golf Club but would ultimately consist of a more heavily-landscaped proposal featuring expansive of surface parking.
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Oakland Raiders’ failed L.A. stadium proposal pitched to Las Vegas

Kansas City—based Sports stadium juggernaut Manica Architectures unused 65,000-seat stadium proposal for the Oakland Raiders is on a summer road trip. When the team’s bid to relocate to Southern California fell through earlier this year, plans for the potential Los Angeles Raiders’ Carson, California stadium were thought to have evaporated with it. But the itinerant team and their now-$1.9 billion stadium proposal were spotted in the Nevada desert late last week, as the Southern Nevada Tourism Infrastructure Committee reviewed plans for a potential new addition to the Las Vegas Strip. The design for the new stadium bears much resemblance to the old one, with a regulation-size playing field overlooked by raked seating and leisure areas. According to new renderings included in the proposal, a big difference lies in the stadium roof. While the Los Angeles scenario was presented as an open-air proposal, the Las Vegas version is topped by a massive dome shielding spectators from the blazing Nevada sun. To allow for flexibility, the curving facade elements that support the dome, recycled from the prior scheme, host equally-massive but operable expanses of glass that would open and close as necessary. Unlike Los Angeles, a densely populated and urbanized area (where the now-under-construction Los Angeles Rams stadium will sit on what is widely considered to be the last sizable undeveloped swatch of land in the region), Las Vegas, with its patchwork of casino parking lots, desert scrub, and subdivisions offers many more site opportunities. The two sites being considered: The first is west of Interstate 15 and across from the golden Mandalay Bay casino towers. On this relatively tight lot, the stadium would occupy a compactly-landscaped portion of a site that would otherwise be dedicated to surface parking lots as well as parking structures. The second potential site, located south of the Mandalay Bay casino, would replace a portion of the Bali Hai Golf Club with a more heavily-landscaped arrangement and—according to preliminary site plans—contain surface parking exclusively. The scheme is still subject to approval, leaving team owners to pitch the potential economic benefits of the stadium as justification for their insistence on the city providing $750 million in public funding for the project. Could the team’s owners be pressing their luck? Don’t be surprised if you see this stadium again, somewhere else. UPDATE: Las Vegas has voted to approve the deal.
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Gensler to design the interiors of the new Golden State Warriors arena

Architecture firm Gensler has won the commission to design the interior of the Chase Center, which will be located in the firm's native city of San Francisco. The arena, which will be constructed in the Mission Bay area, will host the home matches of the Golden State Warriors in time for the 2019-20 NBA season. Collaborating with Kansas City-based firm MANICA Architecture, who produced proposals for the arena's exterior, Gensler will fit out the 18,000-capacity stadium's concourses, clubs, suites, administrative offices, home and visiting locker rooms, as well as other visitor facilities such as concession areas, sponsor zones, a team store, and retail spaces. The Chase Center aims to create a new 11-acre district that will offer other amenities including restaurants, cafes, offices, and public plazas that aren't otherwise easy to find in the area. A new five-and-a half-acre public waterfront park will be built nearby; the Chase Center itself will have connections to a major Muni Metro rail line and the BART system. Once built, the arena is set to be the "only privately-financed facility of its kind built on private property in the modern era." "Gensler is a perfect fit for Chase Center, bringing both incredible local experience and extensive global expertise to our project—and, of course, a track record of architectural excellence," said Stephen Collins, Chief Operating Officer of Chase Center in a press release. "We want an arena that is a reflection of the Bay Area, but also a stand-out in the world of sports and entertainment. Gensler will help us achieve that mission." "Gensler is excited to join the current design team on such a significant project as Chase Center," said Gensler Sports Principal-in-Charge, Ron Turner, FAIA. "When complete, this will be a showpiece for the NBA, the Warriors, and the Bay Area, so helping to achieve this will be a distinct pleasure for our group."
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Are you ready for some football stadiums? Los Angeles gets even more proposals for its yet-unsecured NFL team

Just when we thought Los Angeles' football stadium craziness had cooled down, the owners of the San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders have unveiled plans for a 72,000 seat, $1.7 billion stadium on a 168-acre site in Carson—which should soon be on that city's ballot—while Inglewood City Council approved a measure to build a stadium for the (for now) St. Louis Rams, originally floated by Rams' owner Stan Kroenke. The firm behind the Carson stadium, MANICA Architecture, is also designing a new arena for the Golden State Warriors in San Francisco's Mission Bay. The architect of the Rams' stadium is HKS. That office's plan would include an 80,000 seat stadium and a 6,000 seat performance venue, both part of a mixed-use development on the site of Hollywood Park. Showing how serious it is about moving an NFL team to LA, the NFL has launched a "Committee on Los Angeles Opportunities," to "oversee the application of the relocation guidelines in the event that one or more clubs seek to move to Los Angeles. A half-dozen Southern California stadium proposals have been pitched in the past three years, although only the two most recent are attached to specific teams. Other proposals have been suggested for City of Industry, Downtown LA, Elysian Park, the Rose Bowl, and the Los Angeles Coliseum. The NFL has not had a team in Los Angeles since the Rams and Raiders both left after the 1994 season.