Posts tagged with "Manhattan":

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Waldorf Astoria interiors designated as historic landmarks by LPC

Following an initial hearing in January, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) voted unanimously on March 7th to designate several of the interior spaces of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel as historic landmarks. The move was widely expected and has not stymied the owner’s ambitious plan to renovate the building, a plan which includes converting a majority of the existing 1,413 rooms into condominium apartments. The Anbang Insurance Group released a statement in response to the decision:
Anbang knows the Waldorf Astoria's history is a large part of what makes this hotel so unforgettable. That is why we fully supported the commission's recommendations for designation of the Waldorf Astoria's most important public spaces and applaud the commission on achieving landmark status for them.
LPC’s designation protects many of the public spaces throughout the first three floors of the iconic art deco building, including the Park Avenue Lobby, entry hall on the ground level, and the Grand Ballroom on the third level, one of the largest event spaces in the New York City. The designation currently awaits approval by the city council.
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New renderings revealed for SOM's The Milstein Center at Barnard College

Barnard College has unveiled designs for a new library and academic center by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM). The Cheryl and Philip Milstein Teaching and Learning Center at Barnard's Morningside Heights campus will feature the "flexible learning spaces" that are pretty much de rigueur for any new academic building. The 128,000-square-foot, 11-story structure will be almost double the size of Lehman Hall, the building it is replacing. Barnard chose SOM to design The Milstein Center back in 2014, though the college waited until last week to reveal all the final renderings. SOM has envisioned a building with a five-story base and a comparatively narrow six-story top, a move that allows sunlight to flood the adjacent main lawn. In growing its footprint by 50 percent, The Milstein Center library program will almost double Lehman's seating while providing access to the outdoors on multiple terraces. Though there will be plenty of individual study spaces for students who prefer to hit the books in relative isolation, the library, in keeping with the times, will de-emphasize books in favor of multimedia labs and group study spaces. The core programming, which includes new offices and conference space, will be framed by a ground floor digital commons (Barnard is one of the only liberal arts colleges with a technology requirement) and a computational science center for teaching and research. The video below gives a snazzy introduction to The Milstein Center, which is slated to open in August 2018:
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New York City plans a tech incubator designed by Davis Brody Bond

The City of New York has unveiled its vision for a tech incubator, designed by Davis Brody Bond, in Manhattan's Union Square. The firm's scheme builds out the city's ambitions for its very own Silicon Alley. Developed in partnership with RAL Development Services, the Union Square Tech Hub also responds to a need for 21st-century office space: Much of New York's older office building stock provides inflexible or hard-to-retrofit layouts that are incompatible with tech industry demands. The hub will house a 36,500-square-foot jobs training and education center, and 58,000 square feet of workspace for new tech-focused enterprises, while Civic Hall, a member-based collaborative workspace that uses technology to benefit the public, will anchor the project. The announcement included buzzing endorsements from elected officials and project partners that verged on tech-babble. The hub will be a "nexus" for "innovation" and "cross-pollination" between startups in the "booming creative economy." In all, the project's expected to cost $250 million. "This new hub will be the front-door for tech in New York City," said Mayor Bill de Blasio, in a statement. "People searching for jobs, training or the resources to start a company will have a place to come to connect and get support. No other city in the nation has anything like it. It represents this City’s commitment to a strong and inclusive tech ecosystem.” The 258,000-square-foot development will replace the electronics store PC Richard & Sons on 14th Street between Third and Fourth avenues. To support fast-growing enterprises, the hub will offer shorter leases (6 months to five years) than a typical commercial office building. In turn, Civic Hall will partner with General Assembly, Per Scholas, the New York City Foundation for Computer Science Education, Code to Work, FedCap, and Coalition for Queens to provide workforce development for city residents. For Davis Brody Bond, 2017's shaping up to be a banner year for development downtown. Late last year, New York University revealed the firm's vision for a 23-story housing and academic center on Mercer Street, designed in collaboration with KieranTimberlake.
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David Chipperfield-designed West Village condo finally gets Landmarks approval

It seems the third time's the charm for David Chipperfield. After twice declining to approve his firm's proposal for a West Village condo, pictured above, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) has okayed the design, which has changed only slightly since its last hearing. The proposed structure, at 11-19 Jane Street, sits on a largely residential side street in the Greenwich Village Historic District. Chipperfield's work would replace a two-story parking structure with a six-story condominium building. The firm's first proposal, a white precast concrete building, was rejected by LPC in July of last year. A January proposal did not fare any better and was turned down mostly on the basis of its out-of-character entrances and sliding windows. The new design features casement windows divided by red brick mullions topped by stone lintels that echo the neighbors. A more subtle penthouse roofline responded to commissioners' concerns around the building's height. In a post-decision statement, preservation advocacy group the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP) remained deeply unimpressed with Chipperfield's most recent round of revisions, suggesting the condo would look better beside a highway off-ramp:
It is deeply disappointing that the Landmarks Preservation Commission chose to approve a design which is so patently inappropriate for the Greenwich Village Historic District and for Jane Street. The design is barely changed from the one roundly criticized by the public and rejected in January. It still looks like a chain motel, it’s still too large, and it still sticks out like a sore thumb.  The changes made by the architect since January are the proverbial rearranging of the deck chairs on the Titanic.  This design might look at home next to the off-ramp of I-95, but it does not make sense on this historic side street. We hoped for better from this architect, and from the Landmarks Preservation Commission.
Though the project received unanimous approval, the commission urged the architects to continue to refine the design, especially the windows at street level.
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Visual chaos descends on a gallery in downtown Manhattan

The Gallery at Cadillac House, located just west of Soho, is hosting Toiletpaper Paradise—an exhibition that is as eccentric as it sounds. Toiletpaper Paradise invites audiences to touch, play, move, sit, recline, and position themselves in the visual antics of artist Maurizio Cattelan and photographer Pierpaolo Ferrai's curated space. The kaleidoscopic spaghetti world features over-sized stringy pasta pasted to the walls and floor joined on either side by enclaves of further obscurities enamored with space popcorn and cloud fish wallpaper. This description alone should suffice in setting the tone for the exhibit: The inclusion of risqué carpets, a life-size crocodile, tombstone, and ionic column are strangely unsurprising inclusions in their context of peculiarity. Though overwhelmed with imagery, furniture and accessories of note have been interspersed throughout the space. Despite not jumping out at you as much as the wallpaper, a range of midcentury modern furniture can be found within the setting, a feature that has led the exhibition to be dubbed "Mad Men on acid." Meanwhile, if you can spot them, works produced by Italian homeware manufacturers Gufram and Seletti are on display, all carrying with them inflections of Toiletpaper Magazine's off-beat Instagram-ready aesthetic. The exhibition was made possible through creative media agency Visionaire and Toiletpaper Magazine; Ferrari and Cattelan are co-creators of the latter. Toiletpaper Paradise runs through April 12 and is free to the public. The Gallery at Cadillac House 330 Hudson Street New York City
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Pace University gears up for $190 million campus overhaul

Manhattan's Pace University has announced plans for a major expansion starting this summer.

Today the university unveiled a three-phase expansion plan for its lower Manhattan campus. Responding to increasing enrollment, the $190 million plan will reinvigorate academic and common areas at the school's two main academic buildings. New York's FXFOWLE is the design architect.

“Our goal was to create a master plan that matches the clarity and aspirations of Opportunitas: Embracing the Future [Pace's plan],” explained FXFOWLE senior partner Sylvia Smith, in a statement. “The plan responds to the needs of today’s learners, fosters an increased sense of community, and encourages engagement. We focused on student-centric solutions to activate, reveal and connect spaces and places at Pace.”

Phase One channels $45 million into reviving more than 55,000 square feet of space at One Pace Plaza and 41 Park Row, right near City Hall. Improvements will target One Pace Plaza's courtyard entrance, first, and then lower levels, adding a welcome center, new student center, learning commons, and quiet study areas. At (former New York Times building) 41 Park Row, the original entrance along Spruce Street will be restored, and FXFOWLE's work will add an art gallery and another student commons. 

The school's 13,000 undergraduate and graduate students take classes in the performing arts and liberal arts, business, science, and tech in Manhattan and at a Westchester County campus.

Construction on Phase One is expected to wrap in fall 2018.

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4,000 cubic yards of concrete poured for One Vanderbilt's foundation

Progress was made over the weekend—starting Friday, 9pm through Saturday afternoon—on New York City’s One Vanderbilt Avenue as construction crews poured 4,000 cubic yards of concrete foundations into the excavated site. The KPF-designed project broke ground in October of last year after a lengthy squabble over air rights and the controversial rezoning of portions of Midtown. The project’s 1,401-foot, 58-story height was made possible through a special permit which will see the developer make $220 million worth improvements to Grand Central’s transportation infrastructure and pedestrian access. The complex foundation design is indicative of those improvements, making the concrete pour one of the largest in New York City’s history.
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Witness the beginning of high-rise Manhattan with this online interactive map

In 1874 The New York Tribune Building, designed by Richard Morris Hunt, topped out at 260 feet (including the clock tower) on 154 Printing House Square (Nassau Street and Spruce Street) in Manhattan. Though demolished in 1966, the building lives on in TEN & TALLER: 1874-1900, an exhibition at the Skyscraper Museum in New York City. But if you can't wait to delve into the TEN & TALLER, an online interactive map is available below. TEN & TALLER documents all 252 Manhattan buildings erected before and 1900 that, as its name suggests, were ten stories or taller. The museum's online interactive map plots the 252 structures on both historic and contemporary maps of Manhattan. A timeline feature starting at 1874 (the year Manhattan's first ten story building went up) allows users to toggle through the years, revealing ten-story-plus buildings all color coded by typology ("office, hotel, apartment, loft," and "other") in the process. In addition to zooming in and out, users can also appear and disappear the historic/contemporary Manhattan grid. The historic grid is comprised of 101 plates from 1909 Bromley’s Atlas (updated to 1915). The result of more than 1,500 hours of work—stitching individual files together and aligning them with the modern-day grid of Manhattan—the map (according to its creators) is the only one of its kind that covers such a wide geography of Manhattan and can be examined in such detail. Upon this mega-map, the footprints of the buildings appear as users alter the date. Buildings can be clicked on too, in order to find out more information on the building such as: when it was built; its status; height, width and slenderness (height divided by width); depth; architect; building use; framing; type of walling used (and their material composition) and cost. As to why the study only looks at 26 years of New York's high-rise development history, The Skyscraper Museum said in a press release that the early development of skyscrapers was a narrative which they felt deserved more attention. By 1900, the standard method of construction was skeleton construction and thus the technology to allow towers to rise skyward paved the way for an influx of high-rise development. At the museum's gallery, the exhibition features models, maps, historic photographs, and original architectural drawings to depict this narrative. The exhibition is now on show at 39 Battery Place runs through April this year. [Warning: This map will not scale on a mobile device or small screen. You can also access it on the Skyscraper Museum's website here.]
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A new Manhattan exhibition creates a dialogue between two generations of architects

Architectural rendering and design today is filtered through digital platforms that define contemporary production. It is rare to see an architecture that breaks out of this design template, whether the architect asserts environmental, stylistic, or urban design as the impulse behind the form. But Re-Constructivist Architecture: A Call From Rome, a carefully crafted exhibition at Ierimonti Gallery in Midtown, purposefully tries to avoid this new international style. Curated by Jacopo Costanzo and Giovanni Cozzani with Giulia Leone, the exhibit presents the work of thirteen, mostly Italian, architects born in the 1980s and sets them the task of generating “a debate between two generation of architects”; principally those presented in the 1988 MoMA show Deconstructive Architecture and of that show's generation. The Deconstructivists, the curators argue, "destabilized a certain kind of relationship with the design theory" and the architects in this exhibit want to rediscover a thoughtful dimension behind the architectural subject. This new work is more about place, specific local issues, and conditions, and operates from an Italian perspective, much as the manifesto of postmodernism did in 1980. The Architect’s Newspaper is sponsoring a special preview of the exhibition next Tuesday, February 7 from 6:00 to 8:30 at the gallery. It will feature short comments from Kenneth Frampton, Morris Adjmi, Umberto Napolitano from LAN and Enrique Walker. Ierimonti Gallery is located at 24 West 57 Street, suite 501.
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100 illuminated Tiffany Lamps will feature in the New-York Historical Society's revamped 4th floor

Louis Comfort Tiffany is synonymous with the lamps that bear his name. However, a recent discovery about the lamps' origins helped shape a new exhibition space currently under construction at the New-York Historical Society. It was well-known that Tiffany employed dozens of women—known as "Tiffany Girls"—to carefully select the glass fragments that went into Tiffany lamps, one of the many types of objets de luxe his company produced. (Tiffany thought women had a better eye for color.) However, letters discovered in 2005 and written by one such Tiffany Girl, Clara Driscoll, revealed that she was a leading creative force in the lamp studio and designed several lamps herself. Now, the New-York Historical Society's 100 Tiffany lamps will be celebrated in a new gallery that will stand adjacent to the also new 1,500-square-foot Joyce B. Cowin's History Gallery, a space dedicated to exhibitions organized by the New-York Historical Society's Center for Women's History. The newly-established center is the first institution of its kind dedicated to public exhibits on women in American history. Both spaces will be located on the museum's fourth floor, which was previously an archive. London and Prague-based architect Eva Jiřičná, who designed the Jewellery gallery at the V&A, is behind the Gallery of Tiffany Lamps, with New York City-based PBDW as architects of record. Specially-crafted curving glass displays, surrounded by a low-light environment and dark blue walls, will let the lamps shine unencumbered. The 4,800-square-foot, two-story Gallery of Tiffany Lamps will also feature an all-glass curving staircase lit by LEDs. Its glowing structural glass steps, risers, and vertical fins will fit together with minimal metal connection details. In addition to telling the history of Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls, visitors will be able to create their own Tiffany lamp through an interactive digital installation. The Joyce B. Cowin's History Gallery will be inaugurated with Saving Washington, an exhibition on First Lady Dolley Madison, along with items from the archives of Billie Jean King, an interactive multimedia wall, among other artifacts. Lastly, as part of the 4th floor's revamp, a new North Gallery will host items from the society's permanent collection—such as a copper globe from 1542 that traces Giovanni da Verrazzano's voyage—in fifteen themed niches. The Gallery of Tiffany Lamps, Joyce B. Cowin's History Gallery, and North Gallery will open April 8th. A new 4th floor multimedia center, which will feature scanners, computers, a 3D printer, and more, will come online this summer. This article appears on HoverPin, a new app that lets you build personalized maps of geo-related online content based on your interests: architecture, food, culture, fitness, and more. Never miss The Architect’s Newspaper’s coverage of your city and discover new, exciting projects wherever you go! See our HoverPin layer here and download the app from the Apple Store.
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STEM learning and golf—yes, golf—come together in this Manhattan youth and education center

Hidden away on West 117th Street in Harlem, the Bridge Golf Foundation is setting local schoolboys on the straight and narrow—and down the fairway. Packed into 2,400 square feet, the facility boasts three state-of-the-art golf simulators, a putting green, a 3-D printer, and space for a kitchen, an office, a bathroom, and teaching areas.

On weekdays from three until six, an after-school program brings students from the Eagle Academy for Young Men of Harlem to the foundation’s “Learning Center.” Upon arrival, the boys receive a healthy snack and then go off to engage in either golf or STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) classes.

Tasked with coalescing the plethora of programs within the (relatively) diminutive space was Gordon Kipping, principal of New York studio G TECTS. “We wanted the space to be able to accommodate many things either simultaneously or consecutively,” he said. “I was looking at the programming in visits to the Harlem YMCA where it was already underway. [While the location on West 117th Street was being constructed, the foundation used a YMCA to host programming in its initial months of operation.] I saw the kids taking instruction in golf and in the classroom. I projected how that might take place in the space where we were working. We had considerably less space to work with, so the space is open, flexible, and tailored for the multitude of functions that are taking place in it. It actually works better than a big gym.”

Chairman, cofounder, and principal owner of the Bridge, Robert Rubin, spoke of the “architectural challenge” of making the space a place the boys “would be proud of, and that told the story of the foundation to people that come in off the street, but also something that was attractive to New York City golfers.”

TrackMan golf simulators, capable of compiling 27 different parameters relating to your golf swing (or in this author’s case, 27 things wrong), makes the facility a viable venue for professional golf classes. Being the only facility of its kind north of 42nd Street, the Bridge faces little local competition.

Golf also works its way into the curriculum. Data sent in from the TrackMan can be translated into a means of STEM learning. To cater to the other programs that take place on site, netting that divides the golf ranges can be pulled back to create a much more open feel.

Here, the Bridge can double as a venue for parties, though the primary use is for teaching. Using a collection of Node chairs from seating manufacturer Steelcase (who worked withan educational consultant company to conceive this particular chair), boys can work in a more traditional class layout or in small groups.

Colors found in the Bridge’s logo (G TECTS designed a full identity package for the foundation) also correspond to different areas within the facility, such as the simulator, teaching kitchen, and office spaces.

“The response has been very positive,” said Kipping. “A lot of the golfers who rent out the bays are pleasantly surprised because they are not accustomed to seeing an integrated space designed for golf. The kids love the space and have been making full use of it.”

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Developer decides not to build huge glass pavilions on landmarked plaza

Thanks to new rules, it appears that one historic downtown plaza will be free of large glass pavilions, for now. For over a year developer Fosun had planned to build glass-clad entrances to retail spaces beneath the landmarked modernist plaza of 28 Liberty, designed by SOM in 1964. Although the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) approved the renovations in August 2015, the project needed an additional—but contentious—green light from the community and the city to move forward. The developer sought to change the site's city-imposed deed restriction (convents that guide the use of land) to allow the pavilions, some as tall as 17 feet, to be constructed. Currently, the site's deed restriction states that no object taller than six feet can rise from the surface of the plaza. Deed restrictions are usually enacted for public benefit; by limiting use, they can thwart an owner's ability to capitalize on the property. For months Manhattan Community Board 1, residents, and preservationists concerned about the integrity of the plaza debated whether to grant Fosun's request. For Fosun, a seemingly routine appeal for its plaza project couldn't have come at a worse time. The developer's campaign to change the deed restriction coincided with the unfolding scandal over the transfer of Rivington House to a private developer. In that deal, the city lifted deed restrictions on the Lower East Side nursing home, a move that allowed a private developer to flip the site for a hefty profit. A series of public meetings revealed the convoluted nature of the deed-change process, with the mayor's office and City Council offering two competing visions of reform. In response, the Council passed a new law in December that lays out a standardized process for removal and modification of deed restrictions. Among other changes, the law's public review component makes it much more difficult for property owners like Fosun to change deed restrictions. "The developers basically told the board that they're not pushing deed modifications now that the new rules are in place," said Diana Switaj, Manhattan CB1's director of planning and land use. Although community board resolutions on developments like 28 Liberty are non-binding, the city-sanctioned groups provide frontline community feedback on development in their jurisdictions. When reached for comment, Fosun confirmed that it will not be building pavilions. “At this time, Fosun is focusing on creating hundreds of feet of new storefront, restoring the historic parapet to its original condition, and creating a larger plaza by removing mechanical components," said Erik Horvat, managing director at Fosun Property, in a statement. "We continue to advance the effort to invigorate the plaza and bring some 200,000 square feet of new retail to Lower Manhattan. The site offers existing access points and we believe the new retail offerings will provide enormous benefit to the community. We will reevaluate the additional glass entryway pavilions in the future." This article appears on HoverPin, a new app that lets you build personalized maps of geo-related online content based on your interests: architecture, food, culture, fitness, and more. Never miss The Architect’s Newspaper’s coverage of your area and discover new, exciting projects wherever you go! See our HoverPin layer here and download the app from the Apple Store.