Posts tagged with "Manhattan":

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The Enterprise Has Landed, Camping Out Until New Building Completed

The U.S.S. Intrepid looks visibly pregnant, and it seems as though she still hopes to give birth to an offshoot of the museum in a parking lot directly across the street. About nine months ago, New York's Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum revealed that it had its eye on a prime parcel owned by New York State adjacent to the museum on 12th Avenue to house its newest attraction, the Space Shuttle Enterprise. Most of the recent attention on the shuttle has focused on the herculean effort to get it onto the deck, where it rests in a temporary pavilion that sits on the bow looking like a bulbous balloon about to burst. A spokesperson for City Planning said that the city's zoning laws extend out to piers but requirements for permanently docked structures are a bit nebulous. In an interview, museum president Susan Marenoff-Zausner said that the goal remains to get the Shuttle onto dry land. She was quick to note that the renderings on display in the temporary pavilion were merely a concept for the new building, not a final design. The display is part of a fund raising effort for the new complex called “Sponsor a Star.” The master plan calls for a permanent home with all of the amenities required of a cultural institution today, including classrooms, an auditorium, retail, and a café. It would also become the entry point to process the expected one million visitors each year. The lot is already connected to the museum by a pedestrian bridge that spans 12th Avenue. Marenoff-Zausner said that Jones Lang Lasalle, a real estate services company, is conducting a feasibility study based in part on the interest generated by the new star attraction over the next year. Asked about about the project's feasibility, the museum president said, “The State has been wonderful."
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Rusticated: That Nouvel Smell

The hanging gardens inside the atrium of Jean Nouvel’s 100 Eleventh Avenue sound idyllic: “From planting boxes built into the structure, trees soar upward and plants cascade down the walls, lending their scent to the atmosphere,” states the building’s website. But the smell may not be so sweet. A source familiar with the project told AN that the huge suspended planters lack proper drainage, leading to standing water and the early onset of rust. Maybe Nouvel can argue that he’s taking a cue from the Cor-ten laden High Line next door?
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Diller Scofidio+Renfro Take on Exhibition Design at the Cooper-Hewitt

Design studio Diller Scofidio+Renfro (DS+R) has certainly had a very good week. As we noted yesterday, the firm’s designs for the Columbia University Medical and Graduate Education Building in Washington Heights have just been released, and now today, the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum has announced that DS+R will be working with museum staff on the redesign of the museum’s exhibition spaces that are currently under renovation on Manhattan's Upper East Side. The Cooper-Hewitt closed last July for an extensive, two-year face lift and is currently undergoing an extensive reprogramming that will increase the amount of exhibition space by 60 percent and rearrange the institution's functional divisions. Gluckman Mayner Architects, with executive architects Beyer Blinder Belle are responsible for the restoration and renovation of the institution's historic Andrew Carnegie Mansion and two adjoining row houses on 90th Street and Fifth Avenue. While the buildings are reprogrammed and historic features preserved, DS+R will be responsible for designing the new exhibitions contained in those spaces. Along with media designer Local Projects, DS+R is responsible for the visitor’s experience in both the permanent exhibition rooms on the first floor and the temporary exhibition spaces on the second and third floors. At this point in the process, neither the collaboration between Local Projects, DS+R, and the Cooper-Hewitt, nor the scope of the final product, has been decided.  Stay tuned to AN for updates on the new exhibition spaces as they emerge.
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A Spinning Piper Seneca Lands in Central Park

It's a bird! It's a plane! No, it's actually a plane. On the corner of 60th Street and 5th Avenue in Manhattan, a six-seat, twin-engine Piper Seneca aircraft balances on two vertical steel posts positioned at the end of its wings, playfully rotating on its own axis and likely confusing visitors to Central Park. After doing a double take on the surreal scene, find a plaque located nearby and you'll learn that this mysterious aircraft is actually an installation by artist Paola Pivi, whose portfolio includes scenes of zebras on snowy mountaintops and arenas of screaming people. Working with the Public Art Fund, an organization dedicated to present artists’ work throughout New York City, Paola Pivi opened her newest installation featuring the Piper Seneca, How I Roll last Wednesday, June 20th. Like much of Paola Pivi's work, How I Roll challenges the onlookers to broaden their imagination and perceive something that's usually inconceivable in reality. Frozen in a continuous loop-the-loop at ground level, the aircraft dismisses its own identity as a flying machine, floating and spinning effortlessly on the edge of the park. By ignoring its own gargantuan weight and the context of flying high in the sky, plane becomes an object, a sculpture, perhaps finally linking industrial design and sculpture. Just take a look at it spinning in the video above, or, even better, get your own in-person dose of surrealism by visiting Pivi's How I Roll any time day or night through August 26th.
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South Street Seaport Preservationistas: Oh no! PoMo Don’t Go!

The PoMo aficionados were out in force at yesterday’s Landmarks Preservation hearing for the new proposal for South Street Seaport’s Pier 17. It would seem that just as debate on the value of 1970s Brutalism shifts into high gear, the 1980s PoMo crowd is revving its engines. As preservationists and developers whacked it out, some larger questions about context and neighborhood integration arose. The SHoP-designed tectonic glass response to Ben Thompson’s wood-clad gables of the exiting 1985 Pier 17 building is a clear break from the past, both literally and figuratively. SHoP’s Gregg Pasquarelli didn’t mince words when he told the New York Times “We’re taking away the po-mo and making it a real waterfront market building.” But Thompson, who died in 2002, had plenty of defenders on hand yesterday, including a statement from his wife Jane Thompson, who warned that real estate in the new plan “will inevitably rise to premium rates; privatization will intensify, which forces a turn to luxury retail.” Elise Quasebarth, of the preservation consultancy group Higgins Quasebarth, testified on behalf of Howard Hughes Corporation, the developer, that many of the upland elements planned in conjunction with the 1980s "festival marketplace" are still fundamentally robust. The SHoP worked with James Corner Field Operations to further integrate the street grid through a north-south connection to the East River Waterfront Esplanade and east-west connections to Beekman and Fulton streets. But the deal between NYC Economic Development Corporation and Howard Hughes has a distinct cutoff point at the so-called Tin Building. The empty 1907 structure, which formerly housed a market, sits at the river’s edge where the pier juts into the river. Though the plan has the support of Community Board 1, the board did encourage a master plan that carries through the entire South Street Seaport Historic District. Further complicating matters, the district actually cuts through half of Pier 17. The board resolved the districting by extending the boundary to incorporate the north section of the pier as well. The concern was driven home by local wine merchant Marco Pasanella who testified that the uplands should be considered as part and parcel pier plan and that only a “holistic” approach would work, particularly while the pier is under construction. Pasanella said the big picture should ensure that the plan attract similar tenants and “the right sort of visitors." Speaking on behalf of the Howard Hugh’s Corporation, senior executive vice president Chris Curry said the taking the nearby elements into account, particularly the Tin Building, would require a separate ULURP.  He added that the company wants to make an immediate investment, though that wouldn't preclude additional investments down the line. For the time being however, the cutoff point leaves a few of Thompson’s gables left at the back of the pier. Pasquarelli said they would be painted a uniform color to visually drop away. The gables would still function as a mask for mechanical equipment. If all goes as planned, a little slice of PoMo might survive after all.      
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On View> News Paper Spires at the Skyscraper Museum

News Paper Spires The Skyscraper Museum 39 Battery Pl. Through July 2012 Focusing on the years between 1870 and 1930, News Paper Spires at the Skyscraper Museum considers the buildings where the most important events of the day were committed to the public record with ever-increasing speed. Just after the Civil War, The New York Times, The New-York Tribune, and The New York Post all were headquartered on the so-called “Newspaper Row” to the east of City Hall Park (above), each headquartered in early skyscrapers, where writers and editors worked above, while below typesetters and steam-engine powered printing presses churned out morning, afternoon and evening editions. In this exhibition, the history of these vertical urban factories—including their migration from downtown to midtown—is considered through films, architectural renderings, photographs, typesetting equipment, and the archival newspapers themselves.
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Design for Final Segment of High Line Revealed!

Tonight, the design team from the High Line will present plans for Section 3 to the community.  Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe will introduce James Corner from the project's lead team, James Corner Field Operations, and Ricardo Scofidio from Diller Scofidio + Renfro. High Line co-founder Robert Hammond will moderate a post presentation discussion. Unlike the last two sections of the High Line, Section 3 will be intimately integrated with one major developer, as opposed to a variety of property owners and stakeholders. From 30th to 34th Street, the High Line wraps around Hudson Yards, the 12 million square foot office and residential district being developed by Related Companies. Much of the new section will be built cheek by jowl with Related's construction. At the westernmost section overlooking the Hudson River, an interim walkway will span the existing self-seeded landscape, so as coordinated design efforts alongside Related's development and give Friends of the High Line time to raise more funds. The estimated total cost of capital construction on the High Line at the rail yards is $90 million. Construction is expected to be complete by the end of 2013 with a full public opening in spring 2014. All renderings courtesy Friends of the High Line. Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow.
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On View> The Greatest Grid: The Master Plan of Manhattan

The Greatest Grid: The Master Plan of Manhattan, 1811–2011 Museum of the City of New York 1220 Fifth Avenue Through April 6, 2012 In 1807, to head off health threats and a growing lack of habitable space, New York City’s Common Council commissioned a three-year project to organize massive land development north of Houston Street. The Museum of the City of New York presents The Greatest Grid: The Master Plan of Manhattan, 1811–2011 in honor of the bicentennial of the 1811 Commissioners’ Plan for New York, which established the iconic street grid from Houston to 155th Street. Along with the original, hand-drawn map of New York’s grid plan, other historic documents demonstrate the city’s physical development due to the grid’s application and evolution over time. Co-presented by the Museum of the City of New York, the New York Public Library, and The Architectural League of New York, and sponsored by the Office of the Manhattan Borough President, The Greatest Grid will be on display until April 6. Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow.
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Slideshow> A New York Year in A New York Minute

Neither blizzards, an earthquake, or Hurricane Irene slowed down work here at 21 Murray Street. Nor did any of these disrupt work down the street at the World Trade Center. The demonstrations at Zuccotti Park did not get in the way, nor the spontaneous turn out following the death of Osama bin Laden. Construction only paused for the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. Some of the year's biggest stories sat at our doorstep, and quite often, we only had to go downstairs to capture their images. Here are a few photos of the news and news-makers taken downtown, as well as a few from uptown, across town, and over the river...
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AN Video> DDG’s Bluestone Clad 41 Bond

DDG Partner's latest project uses a material often found under foot and gives it a hard-earned respect long deserved. New York State bluestone clads the entirety of 41 Bond's facade, a condo with four full floor units, a ground floor townhouse, a duplex, and a penthouse duplex. Over the past few months usual Bond Street soundscape of tires rumbling over cobblestone has been interrupted by the clangs of the quarry, as masons fit the stone into place. All of the stone carving was done on site. DDG's CEO Joseph McMillan, Jr. and chief creative officer Peter Guthrie give AN a tour...
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Coach Seated Business Class at Hudson Yards

Mayor Bloomberg and top city officials joined executives from the Related Companies, Oxford Properties, and fashion label Coach underneath the northernmost spur of the High Line on Tuesday to announce the first anchor tenant at Hudson Yards on Manhattan's West Side. "Today we announce Coach as the anchor tenant at Hudson Yards," said Related CEO Stephen Ross. He told the crowd that construction could start in a few months. Coach will relocate 1,500 employees currently scattered across three buildings nearby into a sleek glass and steel KPF-designed tower overlooking the High Line, occupying about a third of the planned first tower. Covering 26 acres along the Hudson River and spanning a LIRR train storage yard, Hudson Yards will mix residential, commercial, retail, and cultural space to create what Ross described as the "Rockefeller Center of the 21st century." Two tapering buildings on the eastern edge of the site—the first to be built—tilt away from each other, appearing to peek overtop of their neighbors. They are joined by a seven-story glass-enclosed retail podium, forming a twin-towers-over-a-mall typology that Related made famous at the Time Warner Center in Columbus Circle. At 5.5 million square feet and three city blocks long, Related says the "superblock building" will be the largest commercial building in New York. "Finally you're going to get a building as nice as your pocket books," said New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn. The neighborhood is poised to become  a center of fashion and culture in Manhattan, a point Bloomberg made in declaring that Fashion Week will someday take place at the Culture Shed, an arts center designed by Diller, Scofidio & Renfro with Rockwell Group planned at Hudson Yards. While not on stage for the announcement, Bill Pedersen of KPF remarked on the mega-project's design in a statement. "Hudson Yards must link to the prevailing industrial character of the West Side, while also summarizing this context with a fresh visual dynamic. As a time when extraordinary urban projects are arising around the world, Hudson Yards will be an important symbol of New York's continued leadership in global urbanism." The development of Hudson Yards is aided by the extension of the number 7 subway line from Times Square that officials said is on schedule to open at the end of 2013. New glass-canopied subway entrances designed by Toshiko Mori Architect will be located in Hudson Park designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh north of the site. The announcement is also a boon to the third and final segment of the High Line, which wraps around the Hudson Yards site. Coach's new global headquarters is located in the shorter, southern tower straddling a section of the elevated park and a large glass atrium will eventually face the park. All parties involved—Related, Coach, and the city—agreed that the High Line should play a prominent role in Hudson Yards. "We at Related look forward to continuing to work with the city, and the Friends of the High Line to transform segment three, and make it a very special place," said Ross. Bloomberg noted that the city is working with CSX to transfer the final segment of rail to the city.
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Bjarke Ingels, WSJ Architecture Innovator of the Year

If Bjarke Ingelsascension into starchitecture hasn't been dramatic enough, the Danish architect is again moving up in the world. On Friday, Ingels' firm BIG threw a party to christen their new office space in Manhattan. BIG has expanded its Chelsea presence, moving up from the third to the twelfth floor of the Starrett-Lehigh Building. A press preview of the new space preceded the party a couple floors above. Among those in attendance were Crown Prince Frederik and Princess Mary of Denmark, who earlier this month awarded Ingels the $90,000 Culture Prize—the MacArthur of Scandinavia—for his emerging work in architecture. Now it looks like Ingels' October has just been getting started. The Wall Street Journal Magazine will declare the Danish architect among its inaugural Innovators of the Year. Bjarke, seemingly by-passing starchitect status directly to super-starchitect, wins in the architecture category for "his wildly expressive structures, including the radical re-imagining of the New York high-rise apartment building, his commitment to sustainability and his philosophy of 'pragmatic utopianism.'" Richard Wurman, architect, author, and founder of the TED conferences (at which Bjarke has spoken) will present the trailblazing award to Ingels this Thursday at the Museum of Modern Art. No word yet on whether royalty will be in attendance. Ai Weiwei took the innovator award for art, Katie Grand for fashion, Elon Musk for technology, Steve Ells for food, Joris Laarman for design, and Bill Gates' and Warren Buffett's The Giving Pledge for philanthropy. Profiles of each of these Innovators of the Year will be featured in the October 29 issue of WSJ Magazine.