Posts tagged with "Manhattan":

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New York City’s building trades unions rally at City Hall for higher wages, better working conditions

Today, members of New York's building trades unions marched on City Hall for wages that correspond to the rising cost of living, safer working conditions, more diversity, and strong unions to advocate on behalf of all workers. Middle Class Strong, a grassroots coalition administered through the Building & Construction Trades Council of Greater New York, organized the march and rally. https://twitter.com/LiUNALocal55/status/675041988228620289 Richard Jacobs Jr., business development specialist at D.C. 9 1974 (International Union of Painters & Allied Trades), noted that unions oppose "contractors and businesses that skirt paying a fair wage." The unions, moreover, provide for worker's economic security by ensuring that its members have another job lined up when their current job wraps up. Many protesters held "Middle Class Strong" signs. Middle Class Strong protects the rights of union and nonunion laborers. Coffins in front of the speaker's podium represent lives lost on the job. https://twitter.com/AffordabilityNY/status/675016785406595073 Real Affordability for All (RAFA), a coalition of affordable housing organizations in New York, pledged solidarity with workers protesting for fair wages. RAFA's advocacy underscores the connection between a living wage and housing access. The group's ongoing projects include proposing alternatives to the rezoning of East New York and other low-income neighborhoods. https://twitter.com/ALIGNny/status/675032433448873984 Public Advocate Letitia James, New York State Assembly Representative Francisco Moya, City Council majority leader Jimmy Van Bramer, and others spoke at the rally in support of the union's objectives. Developers, architects, and other builders, what do you think? Are the unions' demands fair? https://twitter.com/RoryLancman/status/675028656146751488 https://twitter.com/TishJames/status/675048530688503809
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Taking Buildings Down: Storefront provokes ideas on the built environment in new competition

Perhaps following up on its Halloween Party this year that explored the theme "DEMO," as in DEMO-lition among other words sharing the root, the Storefront for Art & Architecture has launched a competition called "Taking Buildings Down," where “removal is all that is allowed.” The competition takes what is usually considered to be a violent act and calls upon “anyone interested in articulating visions for the future of our built environment” to submit proposals for “the production of voids; the demolition of buildings, structures, and infrastructures; or the subtraction of objects and/or matter as a creative act.” The intent of the “competition of the competition of competitions” is to elicit ideas about demolition, to provoke criticism, and to speculate. Judges include Jeff Byles, author of Rubble: Unearthing the History of Demolition; architect and professor at Yale University, Keller Easterling; associate professor and associate dean at the New School’s School of Media Studies and adjunct curator of new media arts at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Christiane Paul; and principal of  Selldorf Architects, Annabelle Selldorf. Monetary prizes will be awarded to first, second, and third place winners; winning entries and “any additional entries deemed to be worthy of publication” will be published by Storefront for Art & Architecture. Entries are due on January 20th. More information, including specific eligibility and criteria, can be found here.
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MoMA names Sean Anderson associate curator of the Department of Architecture and Design

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York has selected Sean Anderson as its new associate curator in the department of architecture and design. Anderson will work alongside fellow department employees to create collections, exhibitions, and public programs that focus on contemporary architecture. Anderson will also assist in managing MoMA's Issues in Contemporary Architecture exhibition series and the Young Architects Program, as well as serve as the main contact for both local and global architecture communities. He holds degrees in architectural design and the history of architecture and urban development from Cornell University, a master’s degree in architectural design from Princeton University, and a PhD in art history from the University of California, Los Angeles. Anderson most recently served as the senior lecturer of design and history and undergraduate program director at the University of Sydney in Australia, and he has worked as an architect in Afghanistan, India, Morocco, Sri Lanka, and the United States. "As both an architect and an academic, Sean brings a unique and global perspective to contemporary architecture. He has the capacity to balance the experience of practicing architecture with an intellectually rigorous inquiry into the field, framing contemporary issues in a fascinating and engaging way. We are excited to have him expand our curatorial understanding of contemporary architecture," Martino Stierli, Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, said in a statement. Anderson’s appointment will be effective on November 30, 2015.
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The sky’s the limit: Bjarke Ingels lands a pair of slanting towers on the High Line

Clearly, higher ups at the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) are channeling beloved New York rapper Notorious B.I.G.'s approach to urban space. The firm's recent high-profile commissions (hello, Pittsburgh!) reflect Biggie's mantra: "the sky is the limit, and [you] know that you can have what you want, be what you want, have what you want, be what you want," ad infinitum. Now, Ingels is again looking skyward with a new project along New York's High Line. Today, YIMBY reported that BIG has released preliminary renderings for its project on the High Line, at Eleventh Avenue and 17th Street. The eastern tower will rise 28 floors (302 feet) adjacent to its 38 story (402 feet) western sibling. The buildings will feature 300 apartments (most with two and three bedrooms), retail space, and a hotel. Apartments will sit above a three-level, 150,000-square-foot hotel, and 50,00 square feet of ground floor retail. HFZ Capital paid an astonishing $870 million for the site last summer. The tower's aggressive diagonal cut will allow views of the High Line from the southern side of the western tower. The project's expected completion date is 2018. Just keep pressin' on, BIG. Just as newsworthy, perhaps: Why has it taken BIG so long to land a High Line commission alongside fellow starchitects Zaha Hadid, Frank Gehry, Jean Nouvel, Norman Foster, and countless others?
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Santiago Calatrava awarded European Prize for Architecture

Tuesday night at a ceremony on the 33rd floor of World Trade Center 7, high above his World Trade Center Transportation Hub, Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava was awarded the European Prize for Architecture by the Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design and the European Centre for Architecture. The accolade is awarded to architects each year who have made substantial contributions to the field. Last year's winner was Alessandro Mendini, who was given the award at a ceremony in Milan. In the crowd was a host of construction industry professionals, each with a table. Calatrava and his family had a table in the front, and Calatrava was giddy as the representatives of the Chicago Athenaeum and European Centre praised his long and prolific career. The highlight of the night was then he was presented with a crown made of olive leaves from the Parthenon in Athens. Calatrava gave a short lecture about his work, from his first projects in Zurich and Spain to his over 50 bridges around the world. He explained how he was trained as an engineer, but was eventually inspired by the human form and eyebrows, which evolved into his signature reptilian style.    
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Sleek renderings show what it’s like to live in Zaha Hadid’s luxurious 520 West 28th Street in New York

Renowned architect Zaha Hadid has unveiled interior renderings of her futuristic, 11-story residential development located at 520 West 28th Street in New York's Chelsea neighborhood, which, believe it or not, is her first residential building in the Big Apple. The curvaceous tower stands 135 feet tall and features two- to five-bedroom floor plans that range from a price tag of $4.95 million to $50 million. The tower will be outfitted with a 2,500-square-foot sculpture deck, art from Friends of the High Line, an automated underground parking lot with a robot-operated storage facility, a double-height lobby, an entertainment lounge, and a 12-seat IMAX screening room. The development will also include a 75-foot pool, a gym, and a luxury spa suite equipped with a spa pool, cold plunge pool, waterfall shower, sauna, steam room, chaise lounges, and massage beds.   The unit’s bathrooms will be comprised of electrochromic glass with a frosting feature, and the kitchens will include high-end appliances by Gaggenau. The new complex is slated to open in late 2016 or early 2017. Based on the complex's website, it looks like developers are looking to "casually" add Hadid's name to the building title. Perhaps, following the lead of New York By Gehry? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.  
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Vote for your favorite Critical Halloween costumes in Storefront for Art & Architecture’s annual competition

Each year, the Storefront for Art and Architecture hosts a Halloween Party in New York called "Critical Halloween." Themes have ranged from "Corporate Avant-Garde" to "On Banality, On Metaphor," and the costume contest is the highlight of the night, as party-goers relive the Avant-garde tradition of building fantastic architectural costumes. This year, the theme as "DEMO-", giving dressers-up an open field for ideas, including democracy, demolition, demographics, and even Nicholas DE MOnchaux or MaDEMOiselle. With Halloween receding into the past, it's time to vote for your favorite costume. Vote here and make sure to cast your vote for AN Senior Editor Matt Shaw, pictured below, and his "you figure it out," knowledge-DEMOlishing costume non-sequitur "DEMO? I thought you said DEVO!?" COSTUME COMPETITION PRIZES This year the DEMO jury announced the awards at midnight. The jury was comprised of: Keller Easterling, Winka Dubbeldam, Andres Jaque, and Beatrice Galilee. The jury awarded seven prizes in the following categories: Best Overall Costume “Building Cuts: The Ghost of Matta” Steven Holl Architects Best Individual Costume “Archzilla” Evalynn Rosado – Weiss/Manfredi Best Duo/Couple Costume “Permitted and Unpermitted” Adam Frampton and Karolina Czeczek – ONLY IF Best Group Costume “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon” Francisco Rocha, Joana Bem-Haja, Joana Torres, and Sandra Shizuka Special Prize for Best Demolition Costume “The Fall of the Berlin Wall” Leong Leong Special Prize for Best Demonstration Costume “Smoke” Studio Dror Special Prize for Best Democracy Costume “Democracy, The Puppet of Capital” Miguel de Guzman and Ines Esnal Vote for our editor Matt Shaw here.
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Already under construction, SHoP’s plan modified for South Street Seaport’s Pier 17

On October 20, the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) approved the Howard Hughes Corporation and SHoP Architects' re-visioning of the South Street Seaport's Pier 17—with one crucial change. The developers will comply with the LPC's request to remove a glass pergola shading the rooftop lawn. The 250,000-square-foot, $200 million Pier 17 retail mall and public space  is the anchor of the Seaport makeover. Though the LPC approved the design in 2013 (and construction has begun), the LPC review last week was precipitated by the addition of the pergola and the demolition of the adjacent Link Building, two unapproved aspects of the initial development plan. When the pier plan was introduced in August, the LPC raised concerns about the pergola. Neighbors' fears were classic NIMBY: residents worried that covering the lawn would draw bigger crowds to the Seaport's popular concerts and events. Though the LPC can't regulate city vistas, neighbors also voiced concerns that the pergola would block views of the Brooklyn Bridge. Now, residents will enjoy unobstructed—or at least less obstructed—views of the bridge, as well the last coup from the LPC meeting: modified paving on the site's access road. The road is an extension of Fulton Street that will encircle the front of the pier. Instead of asphalt, visitors will tread on precast concrete pavers. Though the Pier 17 deal seems like a relatively utopian public-private compromise, controversy over the overall development looms. Neighbors and preservationists have greeted SHoP's planned, 42 story, 500 tower with vociferous opposition. While the tower is not in a historic district, and thus outside the LPC's purview, the community continues to debate the project. Another major (and potentially contentious) project in the area is the S. Russell Groves–designed, 60 story skyscraper at 151 Maiden Lane, announced in September. The typology of the South Street Seaport reflects its status as one of New York's oldest districts. Like all historic neighborhoods, it must contend with the priorities of a densifying city. It remains to be seen how SHoP's plan, and other nearby redevelopments, impact the district's function and character.
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Archtober Building of the Day 30> Chilewich Store by De-Spec

Chilewich Store 23 East 20th Street, Manhattan De-Spec This is the project that every architect dreams of (or should, at least). With designers as clients, visually striking product, and close involvement from the start, Tom Shea and Farnaz Mansuri of De-Spec were able to develop a concept for Chilewich from the ground up. The close collaboration between Chilewich and De-Spec began with the De-Spec–designed artisanal chocolate shop XOCOLATTI, a previous Building of the Day and 2012 AIANY Design Award winner. The shop caught Sandy Chilewich’s eye as she walked past its Soho storefront a couple of years ago. She and her husband/business partner Tom Sultan got in touch with the firm, asking it to develop a concept for what would become their first brick-and-mortar store – and a 2015 AIANY Design Award winner. A matrix of movable pegs displays the merchandise as a network of points and lines. Brightly-colored tablecloths, runners, and rugs pop against a matte-black MDF surface. The simultaneously soft and fractured surface of a long wall running behind the register contrasts with the adjacent grids, and keeps the store from appearing cluttered. Any display space that is lost is more than made up for by a similarly well-organized basement. De-Spec also designed the store’s furniture, which is rearranged every few months to show off new products. A pair of pentagonal tables visible from the street offers an intentionally awkward canvas for place settings, and lends a touch of quirkiness to the display. Although the peg system is not changed all that often, it’s nice to know that it can be tinkered with. Because the designers came up with the concept before the site was selected, they know that its bones can be replicated in new spaces if the company decides to expand its collection of retail stores. Fun fact: The Ramones’ first performance, with tickets at $2, took place here. Something to think about the next time you’re shopping for table linens. Join us tomorrow for this year’s final Building of the Day: SculptureCenter in Long Island City. Julia Cohen is the Archtober Coordinator at the Center for Architecture.
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Archtober Building of the Day 29> The Musket Room by Shadow Architects

The Musket Room 265 Elizabeth Street, Manhattan Shadow Architects If we visit Michelin star restaurants next Archtober, we’ve got to make a deal for the meal. The meal’s the thing here. The Musket Room moved into Manhattan's old Rialto space, a long-gone hangout for architects working in the nearby Puck Building. It's got a gun over the bar. Larry Cohn of architect-of-record Shadow Architects, prepared the filing documents that wended their way through the post-Sandy building department. The warm woods and teal leather banquettes specified by London-based Alexander Waterworth Interiors, have replaced the bright red plastic ones that lined the brick side walls of the not-forgotten Rialto. A nice chap, Larry, took us through the restaurant, and showed us the spanking clean basement kitchen with its array of chemical lab experiments called food. Frank Hanes, the sous chef, explained the polyethylene-encased meats that were being cooked sous-vide: venison leg fillets, a specialty of the house on the menu as “New Zealand red deer/flavors of gin,” which includes licorice and fennel – and maybe a juniper berry or two. You can tell I’m not a foodie. It was nice to see nasturtiums growing in the raised beds in the back that serve as an herb garden for the chef, New Zealander Mack Lambert, who conjures a nasturtium vinaigrette that might appear somewhere in the early courses of our future meal. We could top it off with Pig’s blood/berries/rhubarb/herbs for dessert. Cynthia Phifer Kracauer is the Managing Director of the Center for Architecture and the festival director for Archtober: Architecture and Design Month NYC. She was previously a partner at Butler Rogers Baskett, and from 1989-2005 at Swanke Hayden Connell. After graduating from Princeton (AB 1975, M.Arch 1979) she worked for Philip Johnson, held faculty appointments at the University of Virginia, NJIT, and her alma mater.
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Archtober Building of the Day 27> National September 11 Memorial Museum Pavilion

National September 11 Memorial Museum Pavilion 180 Greenwich Street, Manhattan Snøhetta The Survivor Tree lived on the site of the original World Trade Center. After the attacks on September 11, 2001, the burnt and ailing pear tree was removed from its home and nursed back to health. It has since returned and continued to flourish, and has become a symbol for recovery and resiliency. From a spot beside the tree, the glowing National September 11 Memorial Museum Pavilion appears to grow straight out of the ground, itself representing the past and promise of the future. On the 27th Archtober tour, Aaron Dorf from Snøhetta explained that the firm had initially worked on a different project for the site that didn’t go forward, but the team was asked to return and design a welcome center that could address the museum’s security issues. The entrance to the museum presented an entirely new set of security challenges, and Snøhetta was tasked with finding a creative solution. The pavilion’s program expanded to include not only the security-screening lobby, but also a private room for victims’ family members, an auditorium, a café, and myriad back-of-house mechanical services for all of the buildings on the site. In addition to being a transitional space for visitors between the memorial plaza and the below-ground museum, the building is also a vent, allowing air to move through the slatted wood ceiling and perforated metals. Visible through the transparent facade, original steel columns from the World Trade Center  anchor the building. After being removed from the rubble at Ground Zero, these imposing columns were rebuilt and re-engineered. Although they do not serve any structural purpose, the building was designed around them. Referred to as “tridents” because they branch out into three prongs that formed the small but distinct windows of the World Trade Center towers, the dark structures, standing amid the building’s muted tones, set the tone. A prefabricated web of steel beams provide the necessary structural support without distracting from the tridents. Their asymmetrical pattern, however, adds texture and movement next to the glass walls. From inside, they do not diminish views of the site and the surrounding buildings. The mix of raw and highly refined materials, rough concrete and polished wood side by side, creates an intimate space that gently leads visitors into the museum below, and also helps them readjust when they leave. The relatively small building rises like an urban bridge between the vertical towers around it. It is a bridge between the museum below and everything above, between natural and artificial light – and between the past and the future. Emma Pattiz is the Policy Coordinator at the Center for Architecture and the AIA New York Chapter.
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Archtober Building of the Day 26> El Barrio’s Artspace PS109 by HHL Architects

El Barrio’s Artspace PS109 215 East 99th Street, Manhattan HHL Architects Jazz musician Ellen O’Brien still gets teary-eyed when she recounts the tale of how she ended up in a spacious one-bedroom apartment at El Barrio’s Arstpace PS109. Like many artists in New York City, life has been a struggle. When an already precarious financial situation coincided with her apartment burning down, she lost everything except the clothes on her back. Luckily, Ellen was one of 89 applicants selected from a pool of 53,000 to reside in Artspace’s community-driven live/work artists’ housing project. It is quite fitting that El Barrio’s Artspace was once a school, given the spirit of creative development it espouses. Designed in 1898 by Charles B.J. Snyder as a Neo-Gothic public palace of learning, the building was eventually abandoned, sitting fallow during the 1990s. “The place was just a war zone,” said Archtober tour guide and HHL Architects Partner Matthew W. Meier. Steel roof members were rusted through, wooden floors had rotted, and squatters had made the site their home. HHL Architects was challenged to preserve the original characteristics of the dilapidated school while configuring the classroom spaces into functional live/work apartments. They salvaged as many materials as possible, from decorative terracotta to crown moldings, and made a clear distinction between historical and modern conditions. Even the smallest units, at 450 square feet, feel spacious due to the original structure’s soaring ceilings. The artists’ live/work spaces are accompanied by 3,000 feet of resident gallery space in the lobby and 10,000 square feet of space for local arts nonprofits in what used to be the boiler room and storage rooms. The creative energy at PS109 is palpable; the building’s Caribbean-hued corridors and lobbies double as exhibition spaces for resident artists. Ellen has made good use of her creative neighbors, who helped her set up her new website, photographed her latest album’s cover, and even do her hair and makeup. More importantly, she says she hasn’t been so prolific in years. Living around artists has provoked her to create. Camila Schaulsohn is Communications Director and Editor-in-Chief of e-Oculus. She was born and raised in Santiago, Chile.