Posts tagged with "Manhattan Bridge":

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New York City planning a pedestrian-safety overhaul the dangerous approach to the Manhattan Bridge

Vision Zero is coming to the dangerous and traffic-clogged Manhattan Bridge approach in Chinatown. The New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) has presented a plan to rearrange the tangle of streets that connect to the bridge, create new space for pedestrians, and update traffic flows. It doesn't take any expert knowledge in transportation policy to see why the area has been labeled as a "high crash corridor" by the NYCDOT. There are a lot of cars, unclear and changing alignments, and street markings that are faded, if present at all. For pedestrians, getting from one side of the street to another can be a harrowing experience. The Bowery crossing, for example, is almost 90 feet wide. But that could all change soon. Perhaps the most significant change in the plan is the rerouting of traffic. Currently, the bridge's lower roadway heads toward Brooklyn from 3:00–9:00p.m., but the NYCDOT wants to make it Manhattan-bound at all times instead. This would allow for a large curb extension right in front of the bridge. Crossing distances for those on foot would be reduced further by the expansion of two existing pedestrian islands. These new areas would include planters, so the plan comes with some greenery too. Over on Bowery, a concrete median extension would provide pedestrian refuge in the middle of the busy roadway. The DOT also proposes new marked sidewalks and signaled intersections to further clear things up. This plan comes as construction continues on a long-talked-about scheme to turn a triangular plot next to the Manhattan Bridge into the Forsyth Street Plaza. The 10,000-square-foot pedestrian space will cost about $3.5 million and is slated to be completed spring 2016. As for the NYCDOT plan, Streetsblog reported that it will be voted on by Community Board 3 on May 26. If approved, work would start this summer and wrap up in the fall.
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Michael Van Valkenburgh Releases Details of Main Street Section of Brooklyn Bridge Park

[beforeafter]bbp_mainSt_02 bbp_mainSt_03[/beforeafter] Much has been brewing at Brooklyn Bridge Park (BBP) over the last six months starting with the opening of Pier 5 to the completion of Squibb Park Pedestrian Bridge. And now, according to DUMBO NYC, the Park, along with Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, recently unveiled plans at a community meeting to overhaul the Main Street section of its 1.3-mile waterfront stretch at the foot of the Manhattan Bridge. [beforeafter] bbp_mainSt_04 bbp_mainSt_05[/beforeafter] The proposal sketches out space for a variety of activities and amenities such as an outdoor nature exhibit facility, a new Department of Environmental Protection building with restrooms and center for children's educational programming, a revamped landscaping program, a bouldering wall, a dog run, and an area reserved for active recreation.
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Another Announcement at Brooklyn Bridge Park: Rock Climbing Wall Could Rise Under the Manhattan Bridge

It seems as if a day can’t go by without a new announcement from Brooklyn Bridge Park. The Brooklyn Paper reported Tuesday that park planners are pushing for a free bouldering wall to be built beneath the Manhattan Bridge. The proposal calls for a ten to 12-foot-tall climbing wall at Plymouth and Washington streets. This fits within a larger vision to develop the park area by Main Street by expanding lawn space, designing a new entry plaza, and relocating the dog run. This news comes right after philanthropist Joshua Rechnitz announced he was abandoning plans to build a velodrome, a complex for cyclists, in the park. As planners delved into the project, they found that the mounting costs of construction exceeded Rechnitz’s $50 million budget and growing concerns about flooding as a result of Hurricane Sandy added another layer of complexity to the design. Rechnitz, however, is still on the hunt for the right location for his velodrome in New York.
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Proposal Transforms Park Space Under the Manhattan Bridge

Let’s face it, outside of Central Park, Manhattan isn't known for its abundance of open space. This is beginning to change, however, as in this increasingly innovative architectural age, people are looking to odd, underutilized remnants in the city, from abandoned rail lines to decrepit industrial buildings and toxic waterfronts to create the next amazing public space. One such space sits just beneath the Manhattan Bridge, where Architecture for Humanity has secured a grant and invited nine design firms to take on Coleman Oval Skate Park. Holm Architecture Office (HAO) with Niklas Thormark has taken on the challenge and revealed their program-driven proposal. HAO looked to the surrounding Lower East Side and Chinatown neighborhoods for inspiration and the site conditions informed their comprehensive program strategy. Currently shrouded by the massive legs of the Manhattan Bridge, the design seeks to address the park’s lack of exposure by providing opportunities for local artists to create murals, signage, and other installations, giving the park local identity. Other program intentions include adding bike paths (above), an elevated dog-run with views to the East River, the opportunity for a pop-up movie theater under the bridge (bel0w), and a space for potential street festivals and markets.               At the heart of HAO’s proposal is the skate park. The design combines successful elements of other skate parks in New York City but maintains its originality and affords the opportunity for iconic status by using the existing bridge structures as walls for a "super-pipe." It's hoped this new layout developed with skate consultants Shan Reddy and Jack Dakin will not only challenge skaters, but also perform as the stage for a complex design strategy, befitting of the entire local community. Check out the rest of the proposal:
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Quick Clicks> London Calling, Dumbo Nuptials, Eco-Edgy, Odd Couple

  London Calling. The State Department is pushing for design excellence standards and is using its new embassy in London as a prototype.  The  embassy, designed by Philly-based KieranTimberlake, is still in its early phases, but as the project evolves, so will the standards for future buildings commissioned by the Bureau of Overseas Buildings, reports Engineering News-Record. While haute design remains part of the goal, sustainability and efficiency will take the fore. (Via Arch Record.) New York Answering. The call from London that many answered Friday morning came from Westminster Abbey. Of the more auspicious outcomes, the  so-called "Little Britain" section in the Village got it's nickname sanctified by The Times. Off the beaten path, under a bridge really, Brownstoner reports that an early morning crowd beneath the Manhattan Bridge gathered for a live video feed. U2 in Malibu. Well not the whole group, just The Edge. He got approval from the Santa Monica Mountain Conservancy to build five eco-friendly homes in the Hollywood Hills. The dirty little tid-bit revealed in the LA Times is that the conservancy group accepted about $1 million in payments and services provided by a consultant hired by Mr. Edge. (via Curbed LA) Jane and Andy. Two names you might never consider putting together are Jane Jacons and Andy Warhol. But an essay by Timothy Mennel pairs to the "two libertarians" together in this week's Design Observer. Besides both coming from Pennsylvania steel towns, Mennel shows how their respective notions of community shaped the city as we know it today: eyes on your street vs. eyes on your navel.