Posts tagged with "Luxury":

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You can use a solid gold toilet at the Guggenheim starting this weekend

If you have ever wanted to use a toilet cast in 18-karat gold, now is your chance.

Starting on Friday, September 16, Maurizio Cattelan's America opens at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. One of the public toilets in the museum will be replaced by a fully-functional gold replica. The super luxury product serves as social commentary on today's America by allowing the public to participate and giving them a very private, individual experience with the artwork. Cattelan is also taking aim at the art market and its extravagance as well as the American Dream (if your personal American Dream is to sit on a solid gold toilet). It's a signifier of wealth beyond what is comprehensible: Extreme luxury is coupled with a utilitarian bath product.

The toilet references Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain (1917) but with a new twist. Rather than provoking the way art is made and its meaning, Catelan assigns a new function to the toilet as an object of opulence and financial speculation. Additionally, he puts the toilet back in the realm of function, acting as an "artistic transgression." The piece also references Piero Manzoni’s Artist’s Shit (1961) in which Manzoni allegedly canned his own excrement and sold each container at a price equal to its weight in gold. A comment on the value of labor and celebrity in the art market.

For more on the piece and Cattelan's cheeky sense of humor, see this interview on the Guggenheim website.

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New renderings revealed for CetraRuddy’s basket-inspired Manhattan tower

New renderings confirm that CetraRuddy's new tower, at the border of Manhattan's Upper East Side and Midtown East, is a total basket case. The images of 200 East 59th Street released in November featured the latticed main entrance, and the wraparound roof decks with spiral staircases, but these are the first images to depict the full tower. 200 East 59th Street is developed by Macklowe Properties, the same entity behind Viñoly's 432 Park Avenue, but this tower is downright diminutive compared to its nearby cousin. It's set to rise 490 feet (35 stories), with 67 units over 99,848 square feet, YIMBY reports. The ceilings will be 14 feet tall, on average, although renderings seem to show the ceilings becoming progressively higher as the floors rise. The base of the tower will host almost 15,000 square feet of retail, and is clad in a shiny facade that takes inspiration from a woven basket. The ground floor looks awfully similar to Shigeru Ban Architects' Aspen Art Museum, a contemporary art space for the ritzy Colorado ski town that was completed in 2014 (and reviewed by AN here). The woven wood panel facade encircles 33,000 square feet of galleries; art sits cozily inside like a hatchlings in an artificial nest. The video below gives a full tour of the museum, for further comparison: https://vimeo.com/165649176 But, since CetraRuddy is a homegrown firm, maybe the luxury tower's true inspiration was the "Big Basket" out in Newark, Ohio that's now threatened with demolition? Regardless of inspiration, CetraRuddy's new Manhattan structure will cost approximately $278 million to build (think of how many crafty woven baskets you could buy for that!). Construction is expected to be complete by the end of 2017.
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LPC approves Herzog & de Meuron’s revamped UES megahome for Russian billionaire

Today the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) approved Herzog & de Meuron's plans to remake two Queen Anne–style townhomes and one neo-Federal-style home on the Upper East Side into a megahome for a Russian billionaire. The homes, on East 75th Street between Madison and Fifth Avenues, were originally designed by William E. Mowbray and built in 1887-89. One of the houses was redesigned in the Federal style in the early 1920s. For this renovation, New York–based Stephen Wang & Associates is the architect of record. The structures fall within the Upper East Side Historic District, and now belong to Roman Abramovich (estimated net worth: $8.1 billion), a sobering reminder that New York real estate is officially off-market for mere thousandaires. In April, the LPC had a mixed response to the architects' plans. Many members were unhappy with plans to convert neo-Federal rowhouse (number 11) into a Queen Anne–style home to match its neighbors, as the historic district recognizes both styles as historically significant. Today, the modified design responded to the LPC's feedback: The neo-Federal rowhouse keeps the style of its current facade (now boarded up thanks to uncompleted renovations by a previous owner), with minor alterations.     The whole suite of plans call for the replacement of the front facade of 11 East 75th Street, an excavation of the yards and cellar, the creation of totally new glass-fronted facade on the back of all three homes, a new rambling verdant wall, rooftop additions, and the removal of party walls. Herzog & de Meuron associate Olga Bolshanina noted that the structures themselves have been altered many times over the years, but that the firm's design "keeps the buildings looking like three separate buildings." A wrought-iron fence unifies the sunken front yards, and a gossamery metal main door at number 13 provided a touch that one LPC member described affectionately as "creative, in a discreet, limited way." The rear facade of the three buildings will be replaced by a wall of glass and bronze. Partner Wim Walschap described the updated design as "more or less the same, with a better relation between the garden and facade." Additions, like the large boulders flanking the pool, reference nearby Central Park. Commissioner Michael Goldblum offered kudos: "[the rear yard] is kinda cute, with the rock." The commission praised the revised designs almost uniformly. Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan called Herzog & de Meuron's design "incredibly responsive to what the commission was looking for. The approach is pro-preservation and restorative. The project has done what we were seeking."
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Renderings finally revealed for the base of the Western Hemisphere’s tallest tower

With all the attention focused on the impossible height of New York's new crop of supertalls, it's easy to forget that even skyscrapers have a tether to earth. Renderings were recently revealed for the base of Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill's 1,550-foot-tower, which, when complete, will be the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. Most mere mortals will never ascend to Central Park Tower's 95th floor, let alone live in one of its 182 condominium units, but it will be possible to go shopping at its base. The anchor tenant, Seattle–based Nordstrom, will occupy 363,000 square feet over eight floors: Three below and five aboveground. James Carpenter Design Associates created the undulating glass facade that runs up seven stories from the sidewalk. The sprawling department store will be Nordstrom's first Manhattan flagship, but it won't be contained to 217 West 57th Street, The Seattle Times reports. As seen in the two renderings below, the retail footprint will blend new and old by extending into three adjacent prewar buildings. Nordstrom's, along with the rest of the building, is expected to open in 2019.
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Construction wraps up on Moshe Safdie’s Sky Habitat towers in Singapore

Reaching up into the sky in Bishan, Singapore is Moshe Safdie's recently completed development, and aptly named, Sky Habitat. Safdie's design includes walkways that connect the the two structures up to 38 storey's up, offering views across the suburban sprawl of Bishan. Views aren't the only thing offered to residents who take to the bridges at the complex either. As pictured above, a swimming pool spans the majority of the highest bridge (on the 38th floor) complete with palm trees. Below are two more bridges connecting the towers. They provide circulation between the buildings and facilitate airflow through the structures. In fact, ventilation was somewhat of a priority in the context of the Singapore's tropical and climate. As a result, by separating the volumes, Safdie has maximised exposure to each dwelling to combat the humid conditions. That's not to say that they too have been left bereft of vegetation, something which has been a key feature of Safdie's design. The inclusion of such greenery has lead to the bridges being termed as "sky gardens," offering a natural counter to the surrounding urban environment. Bishan, by comparison, is one of Singapore's fastest developing cities. The two volumes of the towers show off a staggered facade that maximizes each dwelling's views and sunlight exposure. Sky Habitat, by name, builds on Safdie's most recognized work, Habitat 67 in Montreal, Canada. Equally hierarchical and arguably more complex, Habitat 67 had its roots in his Master's thesis at McGill University. http://www.skyhabitat.com.sg/assets/video/commercial.mp4
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Bjarke Ingels’ twin towers along the High Line get a rethink with new twisty renderings

2015 was a big year for for the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), but 2016 may be even BIG-ger. New renderings were revealed this week for 76 Eleventh Avenue, Bjarke Ingels' towers on the High Line in New York City. These new views are quite a lot different than images of the diamond-shaped towers that surfaced last November. At 28 and 38 stories, the towers are the same heights as before. It seems the developers, HFZ Capital, haven't finalized the program. The base will still include 85,000 square feet of retail, but office space may replace the hotel portion included in the project when it was first reported. Whatever arrangement HFZ decides on, it needs to be lucrative enough to recoup the (astonishing) $870 million that the site was purchased for in April 2014. Nevertheless, EB-5 materials received by real estate blog YIMBY indicate that the base will hold 85,000 square feet of retail space, 130 hotel rooms, 100 parking spaces, and 260 apartments on the upper floors. These are not the architect's only twisted towers. Construction on the Grove at Grand Bay, in Coconut Grove, Florida, is well underway. The two, 20-story towers swoop into scoliotic, 38-degree curves to optimize ocean views. Ingels posted a photo of the development's outdoor canopy on Instagram yesterday, pictured below. 2016 will be the year to see how the firm's bumper crop of projects from the past five years come to fruition. AN is on the lookout for updates to the Pittsburgh master plan, the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project, the "courtscraper," the Redskins' new stadium (maybe), and Two World Trade Center, among other projects.
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Post-Office Architectes puts its stamp on Tribeca with a luxury takeover on Church Street

Block by block, the line of demarcation between "prime Tribeca" and Tribeca is slowly creeping south. New York– and Paris-based Post-Office Architectes recently unveiled a 12 story, 23 unit luxury residential building at 30 Warren Street. Last October, AN reported on 30 Warren's neighbor, 12 Warren, a DDG-designed residential building less than a block away. While 12 Warren's bluestone-clad facade sets it apart from neighboring buildings, 30 Warren asserts itself with a full block takeover of Church Street, between Warren and Chambers streets. Along the block's busy streetwall, the development includes approximately 9,700 square feet of ground floor retail. "The design of 30 Warren is purposely asymmetrical arranging for an intentional void, staggered floors on the west side, and a southern facade with two setbacks to take full advantage of the views of the Manhattan skyline, the skyscrapers in the Financial District and the river," explained Post-Office Architectes principal Francois Leininger in a statement. "We focused on framing the amazing views and arranged a sequence of large picture windows to capture the grand moments of the city. The framed views were determined from the interior of the units as a way of bringing the city into the residences without overexposing its occupants." Most of the picture windows are single pane, including the 13-foot-long living room window in each unit. To minimize noise, windows on the Chambers Street side are triple-glazed, the New York Times reports. The exterior walls will be coated with reinforced, one-inch-thick concrete, giving the building a semi-industrial feel that dialogues with its grittier neighbors. The one- t0 three-bedroom units range in size from 1,000 to 2,500 square feet. There is not one, but three, floor-through penthouses. (The physics of luxury development defy comprehension.) 30 Warren is expected to be complete by fall 2017.
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David Chipperfield’s Classical display cabinets take a cue from the Ionic column

Looking for a tasteful way to show off your collection of iconic postmodern teapots or architect-designed shoes? David Chipperfield may have the answer. Debuting during the London Design Festival, the "Ionic" display cases find the architect comfortably ordering classical bronze columns and ribbed glass panels. The cabinets have been developed for the David Gill Gallery. "David Gill encouraged me to think to create furniture outside of the normal commercial criteria—the furniture industry is interested in methods of production that are economical and where pieces sit within the marketplace—be that a sofa or a coffee table," Chipperfield said in a statement. "With David Gill, we were able to operate outside the conventional commercial furniture system. It was strange, and yet very interesting." The project evokes the fantasy of architects everywhere: the dream client, with little to no restrictions on vision and budget. "I still wanted to make a utilitarian object but didn't see utility as its primary concern—or the economy of means," Chipperfield continued. "I didn't have to worry about how it was made, just to make something beautiful out of beautiful materials, such as casting and bronze; things that normally lie beyond the possibilities of the commercial process and invest the object with a strong physical presence."
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Tadao Ando opens up about his first New York City building, architecture as living light, and an early career in professional boxing

New York developers Sumaida & Khurana are breaking architectural ground with a series of residential buildings in New York City designed by architects who have never built there before. Their first is a seven-unit beaut by Tadao Ando—called ICHIGONI (152) or 152 Elizabeth—set to bring glass-smooth concrete and highly detailed steel to Manhattan's Nolita neighborhood. And now Ando is opening up about its design. https://vimeo.com/130195081 AN previously covered the project's design by Ando and Gabellini Sheppard:
According to Ando, “A living space should be a sanctuary,” and for the NoLita project, the team has chosen a natural material palette that creates spaces that compress and expand while giving “life to light and water,” according to Michael Gabellini, principal of Gabellini Sheppard. Concrete solids give way to voids of glass and light. “Concrete is a very democratic material, very accessible,” Gabellini explained. “It doesn’t create a gap between the rich and poor like some other materials.”
Now, design video 'zine Nowness has released a video interview with Ando, where he speaks about his design philosophy and process in his native tongue (with captions, too). In the video, Ando said, "A living space should be a sanctuary. It has to be a place where you can reflect on your life. When one arrives home, there's a very tranquil feeling. This project is about that." He compared the design process to his experience boxing professionally as a teenager, staying a step ahead. "Architecture is also a battle," he said. "I wanted to make something which no one else could," Ando continued. "A very quiet piece of architecture." Specifically, he sought to bring a distinct Japanese sensibility to the project while not losing its unique sense of place in the city. "Here is where you most feel, 'I'm living in New York,'" he said. In his design, he said water and light become "a living thing." Watch the video for yourself above and view more renderings here. Developers also plan another 400-foot-tall tower in Midtown by famed Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza Vieira.
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After years of delays, BKSK is set to revive this half-built luxury tower in New York’s artsy Noho district

With some financial maneuvering, the long-delayed construction site at 22 Bond Street in NoHo will finally see some action. For years, a 14-story super structure has been lurking at the coveted corner as a blatant reminder of a hotel project that went south. Now, with some refinancing, BKSK Architects will adapt the existing skeleton into an 11-story, block-through condo building. The Commercial Observer reported "developers Second Development Services and Richport Group have refinanced their $28 million acquisition and construction loan on 22 Bond Street from Starwood Capital Group with new debt from Glacier Global Partners." So this means that the $52 million project is now moving forward—but there is still no completion date just yet. "Taking advantage of the site’s expansive exposure on Lafayette Street, the building will become a literal canvas for art with a giant, site-specific mural," BKSK wrote on its website. "Additionally, the deep site is bracketed by two facades of weathered steel on the north and south ends, framing an 'art garden' within, visible to passersby through a large vitrine near the entrance on Bond Street. This building-as-art concept continues the neighborhood’s legacy as an incubator for art, where beginning in the 1970s, some the city’s most prominent contemporary artists emerged." This will be BKSK's second major project on the architecturally potent Bond Street. The backside of 22 Bond faces the firm's 25 Bond, a stately condo building clad in stone, bronze, and glass. And right across Lafayette Avenue from 22 Bond are two nearly-completed buildings from other big name design firms: Selldorf Architects and Morris Adjmi. The Selldorf-designed 10 Bond Street is clad in sculpted terracotta panels, while Adjmi's 372 Lafayette has an aluminum skin. Check out the photos and renderings of 22 Broad street below to see the building's sorry state today, and where it's headed soon. [h/t YIMBY]
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Was Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park tower inspired by an architect-designed trashcan?

AN had the unique opportunity to walk around the top floor of the supertall 432 Park Avenue tower, where the full-floor penthouse with a $95 million view of Central Park is nearing completion. A Saudi billionaire, Fawaz Al Hokair, was recently announced as the buyer. Ironically, The Real Deal has reported this week that it was also announced by one of the architects—at a Cornell Center for Real Estate and Finance lecture in December—that the Rafael Viñoly design was inspired by, wait for it, a trashcan. 432-park-trash-can2 It's no ordinary trash can, however. The alleged inspiration is a design by Viennese Secession/ Wiener Werkstätte mastermind Josef Hoffmann. His gridded designs represented a new rational, rigorous way of composing objects in the beginnings of modern industrial design. Today, apparently, they are being copied at a larger scale for entire building. The geometric purity of the tower originally looked to us like it came from Aldo Rossi, but Hoffmann makes more sense, especially given the urban context/political ambiguity of the building. In the lecture, Harry Macklowe, who co-developed the building with the CIM Group, revealed that Renzo Piano was also considered for the tower but didn’t work out. The idea for a tall building with a pure form came from Piano, and Macklowe carried that idea forward through the project. “Renzo Piano had said to me—if you have a pure architectural form like a square and you uphold the integrity of that architectural form you will build a beautiful building,” Macklowe to the Real Deal. “That stayed in my mind, and I had considered Renzo Piano for the architect, but it didn’t work out for several reasons.” While the world's super-elite who will soon call the tower home likely would snub the idea of living like an albeit more sophisticated Oscar the Grouch, they might do well to pick up their own Hoffmann trashcan, available for a cool $225 from the Neue Galerie.
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Peter Marino unveils an unusually restrained High Line condo project

In the insane race to build more and more luxury condos in New York City, the High Line is staking its claim as the scrappy younger sibling of Billionaire’s Row on 57th Street. The latest addition will be an 8-unit, 47,000 square-foot building by “the leather daddy of luxury,” Peter Marino. The new building will be developed by Victor Homes and Michael Shvo. It will be located at 239 Tenth Avenue, at 24th Street, right near the High Line. At first glance, we were nervous that this new structure would abut one of the best buildings on the ‘Line, Neil Denari’s HL23. However, the building in the rendering's background faked us out—it's actually a very similar building to HL23 at 245 10th Avenue, which straddles the corner lot that Marino’s boxy structure will occupy. What makes this building odd is that it is not a typical Marino design. Usually, “the leather daddy of luxury” dispenses over-the-top, opulent designs that are perverse in their subversion and skirting of the logic of efficient detailing. The initial rendering of 239 Tenth shows little in common with Marino's flashy and very luxurious interiors and retail spaces. Instead, the facade appears as a flat black grid with uneven yet predictable fenestrations. We'll be waiting to see the details.