Posts tagged with "Luxury Condos":

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Miami’s jet-set mixes art, design, and luxury, leading to a new wave of high-design condo projects

This article appears in The Architect’s Newspaper’s April 2017 issue, which takes a deep dive into Florida to coincide with the upcoming AIA Conference on Architecture in Orlando (April 27 to 29). We’re publishing the issue online as the Conference approaches—click here to see the latest articles to be uploaded.

Miami has a certain glitzy, glamorous character unique to its shores and streets. In recent years, the tropical climate and Latin flair have brought an influx of foreign investment and international attention. South Beach, the Design District, and events like Art Basel Miami Beach and Design Miami/ have attracted not only a moneyed crowd of beach-goers, but one that—in a new wave of spending and development—not only wants nice things, but cool things. This new attitude about art and design as an essential element of luxury has spawned a wave of condo projects that incorporate “starchitects” as part of the sales pitch—from Rem Koolhaas and Zaha Hadid to Isay Weinfeld and Renzo Piano.

“Having an extremely high caliber of art, design, and architecture elevates the entire property to a work of art itself. This creates timeless value that speaks to a very niche type of buyer and has the ability to supersede shifts in the market,” Edgardo Defortuna, founder and president of Fortune International Group, said.

Many of the condo projects are based on the old hotel-apartment model, where the most affluent guests would simply live in a resort. But today private, all-residence buildings come equipped with all the amenities of a Florida resort, and then some.

Take a look at the latest batch of residential towers:

Eighty Seven Park 8701 Collins Avenue, Surfside Architect: Renzo Piano Building Workshop with West 8 Status: Under construction Units: 68 Floors: 16

After controversially razing Morris Lapidus’s Biltmore Terrace Hotel, the developers at Eighty Seven Park not only enlisted Renzo Piano to do the building, but they also tapped West 8 to landscape a 35-acre, public oceanfront park. The Towers by Foster + Partners 1201 Brickell Bay Drive, Miami Architect: Foster + Partners Status: Approved Units: 660 Floors: Unknown Announced in November 2016, this 1,049-foot-tall building got FAA clearance and is poised to be one of the tallest towers in Miami—it could be the city’s first completed supertall. Parking will be submerged and it will feature 56,0000 square feet of open space at ground level, including a through-block arcade. The Surf Club | Four Seasons Hotel & Private Residences 9011 Collins Avenue, Miami Architect: Richard Meier & Partners Status: Under construction Units: 150 residences Floors: 12 The historic Surf Club is one of the most famous low-rise hotels in Miami Beach. It is being converted into a large block of residences, but will include 77 hotel rooms. Parts of the old resort will be saved, including the ballroom, which will become the new reception area.

SLS Brickell Hotel and Residences 1300 South Miami Avenue, Miami Architect: Arquitectonica Status: Completed 2016 Units: 124 Floors: 55

This combination condo tower and hotel features an iconic mural on its exterior, painted by Brooklyn-based artist Markus Linnenbrink. The hotel interiors are designed by Philippe Starck and the tower is host to Bazaar Mar by Chef José Andrés, a tile-clad seafood joint closer look on page 6). Grove at Grand Bay 2675 South Bayshore Dr, Miami Architect: Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) Status: Completed 2016 Units: 96 Floors: 20 This spiraling stack’s structure is left exposed with raw concrete columns that slightly lean askance. The concrete floor plates are also exposed and a lush garden by Raymond Jungles complements the canopy and planters made of concrete, which Jungles called “the natural stone of South Florida.” One Park Grove 2701 South Bayshore Drive, Miami Architect: OMA Status: Under construction Units: 54 Floors: 20 Three towers are rising on the Coconut Grove Bank site, where a charming mid-century bank will be demolished and replaced by a new, OMA-designed facility as part of the area’s makeover. The project also includes performance spaces on the ground level. OMA won a high-profile competition for the project, beating Diller Scofidio & Renfro, Christian de Portzamparc, and Atelier Jean Nouvel. Jade Signature 16901 Collins Avenue, Sunny Isles Beach Architect: Herzog & de Meuron Status: Under construction Units: 192 Floors: 57 Every inch of this Sunny Isles Beach tower is designed, from concrete skylights in the common areas to the double height “Sky Villas” just below the $32.9 million penthouse. One Thousand Museum 1000 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami Architect: Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) Status: Under construction Floors: 62 Units: 83 The layouts of the units change as this massive sculptural facade weaves its way up the structure. At 709 feet, it will be the tallest ZHA project to date and one of Miami’s altitudinous when completed. Fasano Miami Beach 1901 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach Architect: Isay Weinfeld Status: Approved Units: 67 residences Floors: 22 The Shore Club has a long history as one of the iconic hotels on South Beach. This stylish renovation—by HFZ Capital—will convert the hotel into condos, but the public pool and hotel spaces will remain under the label of Brazilian hospitality superstars Fasano. The pool will be surrounded by five two-story beach homes.
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Public art component added to San Diego’s “Super Prime” Pacific Gate development by KPF

A new public art installation by Jaume Plensa, the artist behind the Crown Fountain in Chicago’s Millennium Park, has been commissioned to adorn a plaza at the foot of the Kohn Pedersen Fox Architects (KPF)-designed Pacific Gate development in San Diego. The sculpture, made with stylized characters from the Latin, Hebrew, Greek, Cyrillic, Arabic, Japanese, Chinese, and Hindi alphabets and inspired by the roots of rainforest trees, will stand about 25-feet tall. It takes the shape of a seated individual looking out over the Pacific Ocean. The sculpture was commissioned by Bosa Development, the firm behind the project, specifically to compliment the new tower. It will adorn the public plaza beneath the so-called “Super Prime,” 41-story high-end condo tower. Residences in the development are being priced between $1.1 million and $2.8 million for two-bedroom and three-bedroom units, respectively. The 215 units contained within the tower will run between 1,240-square feet and 2,608-square feet in size and will feature interior design by Hirsch Bedner Associates (HBA), a group known mostly for high-end hotel interiors. Overall designs for the tower echo the form of a sea shell, with the facade of the tower taking the shape of a pair of conjoined, nested-curve-shaped towers designed to maximize outward views from each unit. The residences are to be located above a three-story parking and retail podium that will house 16,000 square feet of retail space and 460 parking stalls. Interiors will feature automated climate, lighting, and window treatments that can be controlled via smartphone or tablet. The units will also feature custom-designed kitchens by HBA, with cabinets made from “grain-matched cathedral veneer hewn from single lengths of wood,” as well as custom kitchen hardware, also by HBA, as well as quartz countertops and appliances by Wolf, Sub-Zero, and Miele. The project’s master bathrooms will contain polished stone floors and stone mosaic walls. Vancouver, Canada—based Chris Dikeakos Architects acted as architect-of-record for the project. The Pacific Gate development is expected to finish construction toward the end of 2017.
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Waldorf Astoria to be mostly converted into luxury apartments starting next year

A major renovation is in the works for the iconic Waldorf Astoria hotel, which will be gutted and converted primarily to luxury apartments over a three-year period. The building will close for renovations starting in spring 2017 until 2020. While the exact details of the renovation haven’t been revealed, The Wall Street Journal reports that the hotel’s owner Anbang Insurance Group plans to convert up to 1,100 of the hotel’s 1,413 rooms into private apartments and sell them as condominiums. The other 300-500 rooms will also be upgraded but will remain in use by the hotel. Until recently, a similar plan was in place for the Sony Tower on Madison Avenue, but the building was sold to owners who scrapped a scheme to build luxury apartments in favor of offices. The Waldorf Astoria is one of the world’s most famous hotels, and has been synonymous with luxury since opening in 1931. The architecture firm Schultze & Weaver designed the Art Deco style building in the late 1920s, after the hotel’s original building was torn down to make way for the Empire State Building. High-profile tenants have included Marilyn Monroe, Winston Churchill, and Douglas MacArthur; currently there are fewer than 200 suites available for monthly rental. The hotel is a popular destination for celebrities and others looking for a luxury stay in New York. Anbang Insurance Group will invest up to $1 billion in the renovation. The Chinese holding company purchased the hotel for $1.95 billion in 2014, making it the most expensive hotel sale in history.
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Arquitectonica teams with Paris-based Jean-Louis Deniot for latest Miami tower

  A new luxury residential tower is coming to the Miami skyline: Elysee Residences. Construction for this 57-story condominium at 700 NE 23rd Street in the East Edgewater neighborhood is currently underway and should be completed by 2018, according to a recent press release for the project. The project team consists of South Florida-based real estate development firm Two Roads Development, Miami-based architecture firm Arquitectonica, and Paris-based interior designer Jean-Louis Deniot. The tower, directly on the water along Biscayne Bay, will house 100 units, some half-floor and others full-floor residences, each boasting direct views of the water. In order to take full advantage of these waterfront views, the building grows larger as it ascends into the sky, creating a bold, multi-tiered silhouette. “In this era of technology, this design challenges gravity and announces the triumph of man,” said Bernardo Fort-Brescia, founding principal of Arquitectonica, in a design brief. Other features of the Elysee Residences include a Bayfront facing sunrise pool on the lobby level, a 75-foot resort pool, fitness center, outdoor summer kitchen/barbecue area, yoga studio, spa, a Grand Dining Room, and a library that converts to private theater on the 30th floor level. The building’s pricing ranges from $1.85 million to over $10 million, translating to an average $750 per square foot. When complete, the tower will be the tallest in the Edgewater district.
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Jeanne Gang’s Vista tower in Chicago unveils interior design plans

Since Jeanne Gang's supertall Vista tower first appeared in 2014, numerous design alterations have taken place. However, the project has maintained its original form: a series of simple stacked volumes inspired by a frustum—a naturally-occurring crystal formation that resembles a pyramid with its top cut off. As the $950 million project develops, luxury interior renderings have been released showcasing some of the spectacular views the Chicago tower will have to offer. The skyscraper is staggered into three volumes that will reach 46, 70 and 95 stories, the tallest rising to 1,140 feet. As a result, the Vista tower is set to be the city’s third tallest building in the Lakeshore East neighborhood. California-based interiors firm Hirsch Bedner Associates (HBA) are behind the project's 406 luxury condos, none of which come cheap. A two-story penthouse apartment is may set clients back up to $17.1 million. The project is due to break ground later this year, with completion set for 2020. The mixed-use project will include retail and a hotel. Chicago developers, Magellan have already set up an inquiries page on the tower's website, where 360 degree window views can be found. https://vimeo.com/139190710
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Renderings finally revealed for the base of the Western Hemisphere’s tallest tower

With all the attention focused on the impossible height of New York's new crop of supertalls, it's easy to forget that even skyscrapers have a tether to earth. Renderings were recently revealed for the base of Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill's 1,550-foot-tower, which, when complete, will be the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. Most mere mortals will never ascend to Central Park Tower's 95th floor, let alone live in one of its 182 condominium units, but it will be possible to go shopping at its base. The anchor tenant, Seattle–based Nordstrom, will occupy 363,000 square feet over eight floors: Three below and five aboveground. James Carpenter Design Associates created the undulating glass facade that runs up seven stories from the sidewalk. The sprawling department store will be Nordstrom's first Manhattan flagship, but it won't be contained to 217 West 57th Street, The Seattle Times reports. As seen in the two renderings below, the retail footprint will blend new and old by extending into three adjacent prewar buildings. Nordstrom's, along with the rest of the building, is expected to open in 2019.
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Arquitectonica gets real wavy with new seaside tower in Florida

Arquitectonica tests the surf with ocean-influenced Regalia, a newly unveiled 488-foot-tall luxury condo in Sunny Isles, a city northeast of Miami. But the Florida skyscraper is leaving us with a distinct sense of déjà vu. The tower looks strikingly similar to Studio Gang's Aqua in Chicago. While Gang's undulating concrete balconies extend as far as 12 feet to maximize views in the skyscraper-dense downtown, Arquitectonica's balconies in the same style afford uninterrupted views of the Atlantic on the building's sea-side. Gang's curving terraces were based on striated limestone outcroppings in the Great Lakes region, while Arquitectonica's are modeled on ocean waves. Although Chicago's lake-affected weather presumably hinders Aqua residents from enjoying their outdoor spaces year-round, Regalia's residents will have unfettered access to their sunny terraces all the time, if the barrier island the building is situated on doesn't flood or sink in the meantime. Regalia's 39 floor-through units and two penthouses are spread over 46 stories. "A rectangular glass prism houses the functional requirements," explained Bernardo Fort-Brescia, founding partner of Arquitectonica, in a statement to designboom. "Its transparent surfaces connect inside and outside, linking the occupants with the surrounding environment. Its orthogonal geometry creates elegant, serene, classical, zen-like spaces. Each floor is wrapped by a sensuously undulating terrace. The resulting walk-around veranda protects the glass surfaces from the sun, as in traditional Florida homes. It is this veranda that shapes the architecture." This is not the first curvy tower the Miami–based firm has designed for the Sunshine State. Last year, their 42-story residential tower, also inspired by (far choppier, it seems) ocean waves, opened on Miami's Biscayne Bay.
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Report finds the Middle East could soon be too hot for human inhabitation as Dubai moves forward with its own indoor rainforest in a skyscraper

In an ironic twist, the global fuel powerhouse that is the Middle East is at risk of becoming too hot for human life due to the emissions produced as a result of creating that fuel. Such news evidently means little to the city of Dubai which is currently in line for two new luxurious skyscrapers, one of which will feature its very own rainforest. Jeremy Pal and Elfatih A. B. Eltahir recently published "Nature: Climate Change" which outlines how rising temperatures in the Persian Gulf will render the area inhospitable. The study compares a standard model of CO2 emissions over the course of 80 years to the temperatures deemed viable for human life. The more shocking news is that the research factors in mankind's predicted future efforts to curb emissions. The climate variables that were used to determine that human life was unsupportable were complex, though Pal and Eltahir simplified it, using a measurement called "wet bulb" heat. This was described as “a combined measure of temperature and humidity, or ‘mugginess'” by which a maximum exposure time of six hours to the conditions (of 95 Fahrenheit) was stated. Anything more “would probably be intolerable even for the fittest of humans,” they noted, adding that "even the most basic outdoor activities are likely to be severely impacted.” Toronto-based architect firm ZASA, however, has different ideas. Situated off Sheikh Zayed Road (SZR) in Al Thanyah First, two luxury towers in exuberant Dubai style will offer nothing other than the flamboyant panache that made the city famous: the complex boasts its own rainforest and an artificial beach. The 3.2 acre site will encompass the two, 47-story-high towers, a five storey podium, and two basement levels. Both towers will include a "sky lobby" and "sky pool." Meanwhile, the 450-room Key Hotel will offer fine dining restaurants, spa, a health club, and meeting rooms. The other tower is being called a "Serviced Apartment Tower." ZASA says that the architecture is meant to represent contemporary life in Dubai, while the "modernist" structures utilize "active frontage" via the implementation of podiums that proportion the towers. (h/t  The New York Times for Nature: Climate Change)
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Manhattan’s newest luxury building, 252 East 57th Street, almost complete

What's tall, glassy, and grows all over? Manhattan luxury residential buildings, the latest of which is almost complete. On October 9th, developers presided over the topping off ceremony of 252 East 57th Street, a new luxury tower on the Upper East Side by SOM and interior architect Daniel Romualdez. The team designed the 65-story, 700-foot-tall building with a curved glass facade to allow exquisite views of neighboring luxury buildings. The tower, "will offer exclusive amenities that define a life immersed in luxury," including a "resident's club," a 75-foot pool, and a spa. The units range from two to five bedrooms, with a starting price of $4.25 million. The tower is being developed by World Wide Group and Rose Associates. 252 East 57th Street will welcome its first residents late next year.
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Tadao Ando opens up about his first New York City building, architecture as living light, and an early career in professional boxing

New York developers Sumaida & Khurana are breaking architectural ground with a series of residential buildings in New York City designed by architects who have never built there before. Their first is a seven-unit beaut by Tadao Ando—called ICHIGONI (152) or 152 Elizabeth—set to bring glass-smooth concrete and highly detailed steel to Manhattan's Nolita neighborhood. And now Ando is opening up about its design. https://vimeo.com/130195081 AN previously covered the project's design by Ando and Gabellini Sheppard:
According to Ando, “A living space should be a sanctuary,” and for the NoLita project, the team has chosen a natural material palette that creates spaces that compress and expand while giving “life to light and water,” according to Michael Gabellini, principal of Gabellini Sheppard. Concrete solids give way to voids of glass and light. “Concrete is a very democratic material, very accessible,” Gabellini explained. “It doesn’t create a gap between the rich and poor like some other materials.”
Now, design video 'zine Nowness has released a video interview with Ando, where he speaks about his design philosophy and process in his native tongue (with captions, too). In the video, Ando said, "A living space should be a sanctuary. It has to be a place where you can reflect on your life. When one arrives home, there's a very tranquil feeling. This project is about that." He compared the design process to his experience boxing professionally as a teenager, staying a step ahead. "Architecture is also a battle," he said. "I wanted to make something which no one else could," Ando continued. "A very quiet piece of architecture." Specifically, he sought to bring a distinct Japanese sensibility to the project while not losing its unique sense of place in the city. "Here is where you most feel, 'I'm living in New York,'" he said. In his design, he said water and light become "a living thing." Watch the video for yourself above and view more renderings here. Developers also plan another 400-foot-tall tower in Midtown by famed Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza Vieira.
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After years of delays, BKSK is set to revive this half-built luxury tower in New York’s artsy Noho district

With some financial maneuvering, the long-delayed construction site at 22 Bond Street in NoHo will finally see some action. For years, a 14-story super structure has been lurking at the coveted corner as a blatant reminder of a hotel project that went south. Now, with some refinancing, BKSK Architects will adapt the existing skeleton into an 11-story, block-through condo building. The Commercial Observer reported "developers Second Development Services and Richport Group have refinanced their $28 million acquisition and construction loan on 22 Bond Street from Starwood Capital Group with new debt from Glacier Global Partners." So this means that the $52 million project is now moving forward—but there is still no completion date just yet. "Taking advantage of the site’s expansive exposure on Lafayette Street, the building will become a literal canvas for art with a giant, site-specific mural," BKSK wrote on its website. "Additionally, the deep site is bracketed by two facades of weathered steel on the north and south ends, framing an 'art garden' within, visible to passersby through a large vitrine near the entrance on Bond Street. This building-as-art concept continues the neighborhood’s legacy as an incubator for art, where beginning in the 1970s, some the city’s most prominent contemporary artists emerged." This will be BKSK's second major project on the architecturally potent Bond Street. The backside of 22 Bond faces the firm's 25 Bond, a stately condo building clad in stone, bronze, and glass. And right across Lafayette Avenue from 22 Bond are two nearly-completed buildings from other big name design firms: Selldorf Architects and Morris Adjmi. The Selldorf-designed 10 Bond Street is clad in sculpted terracotta panels, while Adjmi's 372 Lafayette has an aluminum skin. Check out the photos and renderings of 22 Broad street below to see the building's sorry state today, and where it's headed soon. [h/t YIMBY]
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Was Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park tower inspired by an architect-designed trashcan?

AN had the unique opportunity to walk around the top floor of the supertall 432 Park Avenue tower, where the full-floor penthouse with a $95 million view of Central Park is nearing completion. A Saudi billionaire, Fawaz Al Hokair, was recently announced as the buyer. Ironically, The Real Deal has reported this week that it was also announced by one of the architects—at a Cornell Center for Real Estate and Finance lecture in December—that the Rafael Viñoly design was inspired by, wait for it, a trashcan. 432-park-trash-can2 It's no ordinary trash can, however. The alleged inspiration is a design by Viennese Secession/ Wiener Werkstätte mastermind Josef Hoffmann. His gridded designs represented a new rational, rigorous way of composing objects in the beginnings of modern industrial design. Today, apparently, they are being copied at a larger scale for entire building. The geometric purity of the tower originally looked to us like it came from Aldo Rossi, but Hoffmann makes more sense, especially given the urban context/political ambiguity of the building. In the lecture, Harry Macklowe, who co-developed the building with the CIM Group, revealed that Renzo Piano was also considered for the tower but didn’t work out. The idea for a tall building with a pure form came from Piano, and Macklowe carried that idea forward through the project. “Renzo Piano had said to me—if you have a pure architectural form like a square and you uphold the integrity of that architectural form you will build a beautiful building,” Macklowe to the Real Deal. “That stayed in my mind, and I had considered Renzo Piano for the architect, but it didn’t work out for several reasons.” While the world's super-elite who will soon call the tower home likely would snub the idea of living like an albeit more sophisticated Oscar the Grouch, they might do well to pick up their own Hoffmann trashcan, available for a cool $225 from the Neue Galerie.