Posts tagged with "Los Angeles":

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New renderings revealed for Lucas Museum in L.A.

MAD Architects’ proposed designs for the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art in Los Angeles have undergone a slew of design changes, according to documents filed with the Los Angeles City Planning Commission (LACPC). The documents, first reported by Urbanize.LA and filed in advance of a forthcoming meeting between the project’s backers and the LACPC set for May 11, come roughly five months after the museum board chose Los Angeles’s Exposition Park as the preferred site for the new $1 billion complex. L.A. was chosen in January over a parcel on San Francisco’s Treasure Island. The two California cities were briefly in competition with for the complex after backers abandoned an earlier pitch made for Chicago, Illinois. Now, as the project moves toward its projected 2018 construction kick-off, developers for the project are making their way through L.A.’s dense building approval process. The planning document calls for the construction of a 115-foot-tall museum, education, and leisure complex that will contain a restaurant, movie theater, lecture hall, digital classrooms, library, and event spaces in addition to gallery spaces. The project—unlike the proposed bids for San Francisco or Chicago—will contain a massive amount of parking: 2,425 stalls contained within a three-level subterranean garage. The 300,000-square foot complex will be organized with a collection of ground floor open spaces that connect to an 11-acre, park-like site. A rendering contained within the document indicates that the complex has tightened up, programmatically-speaking, and occupies a both a wider footprint and tighter envelope than before. The complex will be organized within an arrangement of dual, three-story piers topped by a continuous, two-level gallery block. The ground floor of the southern pier will contain archives and offices, with educational spaces on the second floor, and the library on the third. The northern pier will contain a pair of theaters and a main entry pavilion for the museum. A rendering included in planning documents shows a sinuous, metal-clad structure topped with trees and planted areas. The renderings differ somewhat from earlier designs and include the addition of a new underground space located below the project site. Construction for the project is expected to begin in 2018 and complete in 2021.
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Breuer-inspired Los Angeles house turns old split-level conventions upside down

The Los Angeles Design Group (LADG) recently completed work on their Armstrong Residence, a 1,894-square-foot renovation of an existing, split-level single family house in Los Angeles’s Silverlake neighborhood. The house's massing is directly inspired by Marcel Breuer’s former Whitney Museum in New York City, except that instead of jutting out over a busy Manhattan street, the Armstrong House instead steps out along its back facade, mimicking the slope of a gentle hill located behind the house. Along the street front, an inset-bay window—Breuer’s streetside eye juts out from the structure—interrupts the otherwise monolithic, charred cedar wood exterior. The front window is contained within an overhanging car port and its panes are torqued to align perpendicularly with the nearby Silverlake Reservoir. On the back side of the house, a projecting oculus is similarly torqued and arranged here, in parallel with the slope. Both windows are an attempt, according to the LADG principals Andrew Holder and Claus Benjamin Freyinger, to “interiorize” exterior landscape features as elements of interior scenography. Along areas where the exterior envelope is broken, like along the lids of the oculus or the planes of a stepped-back, third-floor facade, the wood siding shifts to a natural finish. The house is designed as an “upside down house,” organized with a large, clear-span living room at the top floor with two levels containing two bedrooms, bathrooms, a study, and a laundry room located below. The new top floor acts like a hat over the existing spaces. The living room organization, much like the original split-level design, maximizes the house’s viewshed toward the reservoir. The space is organized around its views, with a built-in kitchen assembly on one short end of the rectangular great room, and a relaxed seating area located opposite. The areas between these spaces are animated through the presence of a pair of operable window-walls that open onto a generous exterior terrace. The indoor-outdoor living room—its front wall pulled back from the facade and clad in naturally-finished cedar—looks out over the surrounding hillsides and reservoir.
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Legal ruling forces Frank Gehry’s 8150 Sunset to reconsider historic midcentury modern bank

The debate over what is—and what is not—historically significant enough to save from demolition continues to heat up in Los Angeles, where a Los Angeles Superior Court Judge recently ruled in favor of the preservation of the historic Lytton Savings bank building. Townscape Partners, the developers behind the Gehry Associates–designed 8150 Sunset project, are seeking to demolish the midcentury modern structure so as to have a clean site for the controversial $300 million project. 8150 Sunset will consist of 60,000 square feet of commercial spaces and 249 housing units organized in a cluster of rumpled towers surrounded by plazas. The mixed-use development has received criticism from multiple fronts, including anti-density neighborhood advocates who see the project as incongruous with its surroundings. Detractors have also criticized the project’s parking stall count, saying the project has either too little or too much parking, depending on whom one asks. Preservationists—never to be left out of a good development fight—have waged a quest to save the historic bank building at the center of the recent ruling. The Friends of Lytton Savings group successfully nominated the structure for Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM) designation last year, but not before the Los Angeles City Council approved a development scheme for the project that presupposed the bank’s demolition. The Superior Court has determined that the city’s overall project approval was in violation of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), a state law meant to defend both natural and built environments from harmful development. CEQA legislation is often used in California for historic preservation aims, especially with regards to culturally-important structures that might lack normative architectural significance. The decision with Lytton, however, was made easier because the project’s Environmental Impact Report (EIR) included two development alternatives that incorporated plans for repurposing the building, which was designed by architect Kurt Meyer in 1960. Under CEQA guidelines, historic structures must be incorporated into new developments if the project can still meet its fundamental objectives without demolition. As a result of the ruling, the City’s approval is being set aside and 8150 Sunset will have to either be re-approved to include preserving the historic structure or prove that keeping the structure intact would place an undue burden on the viability of the project.  Of the various groups challenging the project, the L.A. Conservancy has perhaps has the firmest ground to stand on regarding their bid to positively impact the project's outcome. Sparing the Lytton building is a no-brainer, according to the Los Angeles Conservancy, as the structure is an important example of mid-20th-century design and has functioned for its original purpose—the building is currently home to a Chase branch bank—for its entire history. Moreover, according to the organization, the 20,000-square foot structure makes up a small percentage of the 330,000-square-foot project and could feasibly be incorporated into Gehry Partners’ plan for the site. Simply put, it’s unreasonable that the design and development teams should be able to clear a site of historic structures simply for convenience’s sake. In a statement announcing the Superior Court’s decision, Linda Dishman, president and CEO of the L.A. Conservancy said, “We’re very grateful for this decision, and we’re excited that the development project can move forward incorporating the historic Lytton Savings building.” Adrian Scott Fine, director of advocacy at the L.A. Conservancy added, “We’ve worked with many architects and developers to successfully integrate historic places into new development, and now that can happen here.” Scott Fine explained further: “blending old and new is the wave of the future in Los Angeles.” For now, Townscape Partners’ lawyers are evaluating whether to appeal the ruling.
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The long-delayed Los Angeles State Historic Park finally opens to the public

The long-delayed Los Angeles State Historic Park opened to the public this weekend, capping off a two-decade-long saga for local and state officials and residents. The current iteration of the park has been in development since 2005 and is the first California State Park in the City of Los Angeles. It is located on a multi-layered historical site that originally housed an indigenous settlement home to Los Angeles’s Tongva indigenous community. The park sits along a broad, gently-sloping plane that connected the Tongva’s main settlement in the vicinity of today’s Union Station with the Los Angeles River, roughly one mile away. Native peoples used the river for bathing purposes and water collection. Later in its history, the site served as a railway and warehouse hub for Los Angeles’s burgeoning immigrant communities. The site currently sits at a nexus between a constellation of working class neighborhoods, including Lincoln Heights, Elysian Park, Solano Canyon, Chinatown, Chavez Ravine, and William Mead Homes public housing. Efforts to remake the disused industrial area into a park began in the 1990s via the work of community activists known as the Chinatown Yard Alliance who came together to stop the redevelopment of the site into a new industrial warehouse complex. The park was designed by in-house architects and landscape architects with the California State Parks service, who took over a Hargreaves Associates-designed proposal from 2006. The Hargreaves Associates plan was originally chosen as part of an international design competition in 2006 and was abandoned due to the financial crisis of 2008. The park was built using $20.8 million in funding appropriated by the state in later years, a funding package that includes parks- and clean water-related initiatives. The park is organized into three programmatic areas, including a “Great Lawn” at the southern and central portions of the park for field games, a series of wetlands along the northern end of the park that connects to the Los Angeles River, and a collection of interpretive centers and cultural structures arranged along North Spring Street, the eastern border of the park. The park is threaded with a sinuous jogging trail and also contains a series of mounds connected by a large, sculptural bridge. Portions of the park are designed to become submerged during rain events in order to allow for groundwater infiltration and sequestration. The two cultural structures on the site are also designed with catenary-shaped roofs meant to collect and channel rainwater into underground cisterns. The park is planted with a wide selection of native and imported plant species, including species introduced to the area by Spanish conquerors; agricultural specimens; and ornamental plantings meant to denote the region’s post-World War II flora. There are several installations dedicated specifically to native plantings. Artist collective Fallen Fruit has developed a small orchard installation, as well. California State Senate President Pro Tempore Kevin De León celebrated the park via press release, saying, “Too many of our kids grow up without park access, with nowhere to play, have a birthday party, or a picnic. This park has it all—walkways, bike paths, nature, history, the L.A. skyline—and all within steps of Chinatown,” adding, “This spot is intrinsic to the birth of L.A. and is just as much a museum to LA history as it is an open green space.”
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Los Angeles’s A+D Museum to host Free School of Architecture

The Architecture and Design Museum (A+D) in Los Angeles has announced it will host the Free School of Architecture (FSA) during its inaugural session this summer. The tuition-free architecture school launches June 1 and runs through July 15th, 2017, catering to a cohort of 36 students accepted to the school from across the world. The six-week session will feature free courses on a variety of architectural topics taught by ten unpaid lecturers. The school also aims to launch with an inaugural symposium at the museum on the first day of classes. The convocation—dubbed “FREE”—will focus on the current and future states of architectural education and aims to delve into “new forms of education and pedagogy, disciplinary [and] vocational conversations, the socio-economics of education and post-digital and post-studio education.” FSA also plans to publish an online and print journal titled FSAONE. In a statement, founder Peter Zellner said: "We are very grateful for the museum's spirit of collaboration. In particular, I am especially honored by A+D Executive Director Dora Epstein-Jones's vision, generous support and advocacy for the Free School of Architecture." The partnership is not new for A+D, an institution with deep ties to architectural public education. Epstein-Jones—a founding member of the FSA Advisory Board—explained in a statement that the partnership would bolster A+D’s role in the architectural community: “We are pleased to offer classes and spaces in our galleries to this endeavor, and to be a true center for architectural discourse in our city. Education is our ethical mission at the A+D Museum." FSA was started by Zellner following a thought-provoking debate between Zellner and Southern California Institute of Architecture faculty Todd Gannon via The Architect’s Newspaper. See here for Zellner’s original editorial, Architectural education is broken—here’s how to fix it, and here for Gannon’s response: Of prophets and professionals: a response to Peter Zellner. For more information, visit the FSA website.
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Renderings emerge for proposed LAX transit hub

New renderings have come to light depicting the new Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s (Metro) $600 million multi-modal 96th Street Transit Station serving Los Angeles International Airport (LAX).   The link would connect mass transit riders on the Green and forthcoming Crenshaw/LAX light rail lines with the airport’s forthcoming automated peoplemover system. The renderings, first published by Urbanize.la, detail the forthcoming structure at the corner of Aviation Boulevard and Arbor Vista Street in South Los Angeles. The station would span a 9.5-acre site approximately one mile east of the airport and would mark the first light rail connection to LAX in the airport’s history. The airport is currently served by a shuttle service linking the Aviation / LAX station on the Green Line with the facility. The regional Flyaway commuter buses and several traditional bus lines also connect to the airport, in addition to automobile traffic, taxi, and rideshare services. The transit station will include space for automobile drop offs, a bus bus terminal, and a bicycle hub. The new station comes as LAX undergoes a series of expansions and upgrades, including the addition of a new $1.6 billion  international terminal and concourse by Gensler and Corgan meant to accommodate next generation Airbus A380 superjumbo and Boeing 747-8 Intercontinental jets. That expansion—dubbed the Midfield Satellite Concourse—would link to the existing Tom Bradley International Terminal via a pair of underground tunnels and would contain 50,000 square feet of gateway spaces, including a 44,000-square-foot food court and 60,000 square feet of lounges and other waiting area facilities, among other components. LAX was ranked seventh busiest airport worldwide in 2015, according to one survey, with over 70 million passengers that year. The region’s lack of direct light or heavy rail access to LAX have been a long-vexing problem for city and regional planners—not to mention airport travelers—for decades and were described by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti in 2014 as "a historic mistake of our past." The new station is expected to open sometime between 2021 and 2023.
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USC School of Architecture picks Milton Curry as new dean

The University of Southern California (USC) School of Architecture in Los Angeles has chosen Milton S. F. Curry as its new dean. Curry comes to USC from the University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, where he is currently associate dean for academic affairs and strategic initiatives. Curry is an accomplished practitioner and academic who has worked with the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, built speculative real estate and architectural projects in Oakland, California, and worked for client Def Jam entertainment, among others. Curry is also the founder of CriticalProductive Journal—an academic journal focused on architecture, urbanism, and cultural theory—and was one of the co-founders behind Appendx Journal in the early 1990s. According to a statement released by USC, Curry is “at the forefront of disciplinary areas on race, architecture, and urbanism that engages cultural theory and humanities research.” Curry earned a bachelor of architecture from Cornell University and a master in architecture post-professional degree with distinction from Harvard University Graduate School of Design. Curry has spent several decades teaching across the country. He taught for several years at Arizona State University in the early 1990s and began teaching at Cornell University Department of Architecture in 1995. He became tenured faculty at Cornell in 2002 and left for the University of Michigan in 2010. At the University of Michigan, Curry is also a tenured professor. Curry will replace current dean Qingyun Ma, who announced he would be leaving the post in 2016, after two five-year terms; Ma will stay on as USC faculty. Curry’s tenure at USC will be effective July 1, 2017.
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Updated: Peter Zumthor unveils new images and concepts for LACMA replacement

Swiss architect Peter Zumthor and Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) director Michael Govan have unveiled a slew of new images and design concepts for a scheme aiming to replace Los Angeles's largest art museum with a new 368,000-square foot complex. The plans were revealed last night during a joint talk delivered by Zumthor and Govan to a packed audience at the Brown Auditorium on the LACMA campus, where Govan explained that the project sought to re-signify the museum experience and undermine the traditional museum typology by creating a structure with “no back, no front.” The efforts, according to Govan and Zumthor, are aimed at granting prominence to art objects more equally, instead of relegating certain collections to the museum’s nether regions, as is currently the case. The plans build on a previously-released—and much-derided scheme—that aims to create a large, continuous gallery elevated high above the museum’s site in a structure that would span across Wilshire Boulevard to the south. The sinuous, oil-slick inspired structure—an homage to the La Brea Tar Pits next door—is lifted above the ground on a series of seven pavilion towers that house public galleries, conservation spaces, circulation, ground level cafes and restaurants, and an amphitheater. The pavilions stretch up into the levitated mass to create a complex set of interlocking gallery spaces. According to Zumthor, the project contains four types of galleries along this level: so-called meander galleries along the periphery, with smaller “pocket galleries” located throughout and grouped “cluster galleries” and “tower galleries” contained within the pavilions. The “tower galleries” in the scheme will be located within tall, triple-height light cannons meant to funnel sunlight into the galleries. The design is capped by a massive, continuously overhanging roof that would shield the museum’s collection from southern sun; black, retractable drapes are to be installed along eastern and western exposures to control for low-angle solar glare. Zumthor expressed a strong desire to create a museum from “real materials, not sheetrock,” and has proposed board-formed concrete surfaces for the gallery interiors. The building’s exterior—in fact, the entire building, generally speaking—will be made of concrete, as well. This material, depicted in the new images in mud-colored tones, is meant to evoke the Texas Limestone cladding of the nearby Renzo Piano–designed Broad Contemporary Art Museum and A.C. Martin–designed May Company building. In describing the project, Zumthor explained that his scheme originated with the traditional, non-purpose-built art museum: spaces originally constructed as homes for elite art patrons that brought in light via peripheral windows. This “side light,” according to Zumthor, creates dynamic conditions that allow patrons to “make personal discoveries” within artworks and drove the concept’s organization of small, oddly-shaped galleries with various connections to the outdoors. A preliminary timeline for the project aims to finish the project by 2023, in time for the opening of a new subway extension along Wilshire Boulevard. For more info, see the LACMA website.
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Development team releases renderings for North Hollywood’s new skyline

Areas around the only heavy rail transit stop in Los Angeles’s San Fernando Valley are poised to change dramatically as a new plan calling for the addition of over 1,500 residential units to the area coalesces. The redevelopment plan—orchestrated as a joint proposal by developers Trammell Crow Company, Greenland USA, Cesar Chavez Foundation, architects Gensler, and landscape architects Melendrez—also aims to bring roughly 450,000-square feet of offices and 150,000-square feet of ground-level commercial spaces to a collection of lots owned by the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority (L.A. Metro) surrounding the North Hollywood Red Line station. The plans will also consolidate a series of bus turnaround areas around the station into a single transfer complex. Urbanize LA reports that the plan, to be detailed in an upcoming presentation by the development to L.A. Metro’s San Fernando Valley Service Council (SFVSC), comes after Trammell Crow and Greenland had initially proposed two competing schemes. A rendering of the proposed project showcases a collection of mixed-use towers surrounding a series of open plaza areas and the new bus turnaround. The renderings depict the tallest tower as a podium-style structure located at the northern corner of the site, with a much shorter, perimeter block structure topped with a green roof standing beside it. The back corner of the site is populated by several courtyard apartment building complexes and a mid-rise housing tower. Another tall tower will be located on a corner opposing the main portion of the development. The complex is designed as a Transit Oriented Community (TOC), a notion that builds on transit-accessibility at the core of Transit Oriented Development (TOD) projects by including “holistic community development” that engages not only with mass transit but also facilitates pedestrian activities, according to the report that will be shown to the SFVSC. The plan comes out of a series of community scoping meetings conducted by L.A. Metro and the developers that uncovered historic preservation of the surrounding NoHo Arts District and balance between height, density, and pedestrianism as major community concerns. As such, the development will aim to engage and building upon existing street life in the pedestrian-heavy node while also adding generous paseos between various structures to create pedestrian paths around the station. The project will also include an unspecified number of affordable housing units. A detailed timeline for the project has not been released.
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Bestor Architecture designs new home for Silverlake Conservatory of Music

Bestor Architecture completed work late last year on new facilities for the Silverlake Conservatory of Music in Los Angeles, a music education organization started by Michael “Flea” Balzary of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, music educator Keith Barry, and producer-engineer-mixer-musician Pete Weiss in 2001. The organization helps fill the growing lack of arts education and offers paid classes for the community’s youth as well as fully subsidized scholarships for public school students who qualify for their free lunch program.

The conservatory is located in a 1931 warehouse that has been carefully restored by the architects. An extant wood bowstring truss roof caps the expansive and well-lit interior, while new construction is distributed via faceted volumes that contain 12 practice rooms. These rooms are insulated for sound, featuring double walls and gaskets around windows and doors. Surrounding surfaces made of plywood, cork, and carpeted in certain areas, have also been calibrated to absorb sound.

A mezzanine platform overlooks new volumes that create what Barbara Bestor, principal at Bestor Architecture, has described as an “urban village.” The remaining nooks and crannies created by the resulting geometries are populated by hang-out spaces and can be utilized as a concert hall that holds up to 150 guests.

Silverlake Conservatory of Music 4652 Hollywood Boulevard Los Angeles Tel: 323-665-3363 Architect: Bestor Architecture

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MADWORKSHOP’s Homeless Studio at USC delves into rapid rehousing prototype design

The MADWORKSHOP Homeless Studio, taught by University of Southern California faculty Sofia Borges and R. Scott Mitchell, spent the fall 2016 semester exploring how architecture students can use their skills to address the growing homelessness crisis in Los Angeles.

The studio was funded by MADWORKSHOP, a nonprofit started by David and Mary Martin of the A.C. Martin family in 2005 to bridge the classroom and real world architectural experiences. This semester, the group explored the architectural manifestations of homelessness in order to have students postulate solutions aimed at re-housing individuals.

For their first assignment, students combined off-the-shelf and found materials into mobile “nomadic shelters.” One group repurposed the chassis of a shopping cart, adding telescoping plywood platforms to create covered sleeping surfaces. Two prototypes are designed for bicycle transport: One, a generous box on wheels, utilizes welded aluminum sections for structure and infill panels made of wood and corrugated plastic, while a second works as a mobile bed with a retractable plywood roof wrapped in canvas drop cloth. Others are designed as pushcarts that facilitate fully reclined sleeping positions, with drop-down, accordion-hinged hatches or telescoping pod sections. The prototypes convey a keen sense of appreciation for the dexterity with which transient populations live their day-to-day lives: The compartments on each prototype can lock shut and are designed to be packed up in a few minutes using minimal labor.

Next, students worked with artist Gregory Kloehn to build single-room “tiny homes” that can be used on a semi-permanent basis. These makeshift explorations are designed with space for a bed and reading nook, and were crafted from found objects including shipping pallets, a truck camper, and even mannequin busts, which were used as shingle siding. Here, the students were able to explore the minutiae of domesticity to a level of intimacy not typically emphasized in undergraduate architectural education. The students designed and built cupboards, countertops, and shelving. The emphasis was on introducing subtle aspects of domestic life for occupants, like threshold conditions that could be used as a type of front porch, beds differentiated from the ground, and, perhaps most importantly, a sense of privacy. “A quiet space to get stabilized,” explained Borges, who is also acting director of MADWORKSHOP.

Next, the class partnered with Hope of the Valley, a faith-based missionary organization active in Los Angeles’s San Fernando Valley area—a region that saw its homelessness population increase by 36 percent last year—to develop a modular rapid-rehousing prototype the organization could deploy as needed.

Over the second half of the semester, the class consulted with fabricators, architects, housing developers, and the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety to develop a series of prototypes that could be deployed in as little as two weeks. Vacant lots, the students postulated, could be used as sites for so-called rapid re-housing approaches, tiered measures aimed at re-introducing formerly homeless individuals to sheltered life. Their plans incorporate existing parking lots, under-utilized land, and potentially, land currently slated for redevelopment but not yet under construction, as sites for these temporary housing projects.

The group maintained an eye on the nuts-and-bolts aspects of its proposals, incorporating the technical nuances of the building code into the schemes and settling on a 30-unit courtyard housing proposal that would provide housing units for individuals on a floor above shared eating and leisure areas. The Americans with Disabilities Act compliant complex was also designed with access points for Hope of the Valley’s mobile healthcare team to pick up and drop off patients. Borges described the overall design process: “We brought in all levels [of the design and review process] to the conversation; we’ve really been making it a priority to be compliant on all levels so that we are not a proposing pie-in-the-sky proposal, but a solution.” The team worked to generate modular approaches that could not only be rapidly built, but potentially exist as pre-approved designs vetted by city agencies, ready to be deployed immediately. Mitchell said, “as unit production increases, overall costs will drop via economy of scale. The mobile aspect of the units will have a further costs savings as they are redeployed across multiple sites.”

The class built a full-scale mock-up for its final review, fabricated using the university’s shop. The result is striking in its efficiency: 92-square-feet of white-walled interiors outfitted with a built-in dresser, bed, and desk made of plywood. The rectangular space is outfitted with a special window assembly on the end opposite the door that has been designed to facilitate passive ventilation. From the outside, the modular nature comes into greater focus, as the welded steel moment frame with structural insulated panels is used to structure the module against the white, surface-nailed exterior cladding made of enameled aluminum sheets. The metal frames are designed to attach to adjacent modules while also providing overall structure to the complex.

The plans were praised at the studio’s final reviews, which were attended by representatives from Hope of the Valley, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti’s office, nonprofit homeless housing provider Skid Row Housing Trust, and others. Next, the team plans on moving forward with city agencies to get working drawings for the module approved so the pods can be fabricated and deployed across the city.

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Artist builds replica of “2001: A Space Odyssey” set in L.A. warehouse

In a new immersive art experience on the outskirts of Downtown Los Angeles, Hong Kong–based artist Simon Birch has created a replica of the iconic bedroom from Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey. Birch collaborated with architect Paul Kember of Hong Kong–based firm KplusK to create the space as part of his project The 14th Factory. The duo worked carefully to mimic the details of the original set in ambiance and coloring, using illuminated floor tiles to give the space its otherworldly glow. The replica bedroom, titled The Barmecide Feast, is one of fourteen spaces that weave together across the three acres of the warehouse to create one immersive journey. Birch collaborated with twenty interdisciplinary artists to create this multi-media extravaganza, with work ranging from installations and paintings to video and performance art. “My hope for The 14th Factory is to bring a broad range of minds together, to uplift and inspire, ignite conversation, action, and solutions but also to provoke,” said Birch in a press release. “There are installations here that discuss love, loss, fear, pain, hope... our shared experience, but that also ask the question; as civilizations have risen and fallen, are we now at the brink of collapse or the start of a wonderful new chapter?” Birch continues to explain that he hopes the Factory will act as a “safe haven” where people are able to immerse themselves in a journey and be transformed. It would seem Birch is going further than replicating the cult film’s iconic set, also paralleling its existential quest examining the future of mankind. Birch and his collaborators are currently turning the multi-media adventure into a documentary-style film, where visitors take on the role of protagonists as the space’s story unfolds. The space is currently open to visitors by appointment, and Birch hopes to temporarily open the space to the public once filming has concluded. For more information visiting or about the artists featured at The 14th Factory, you can visit their website here.