Posts tagged with "loot":

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Raise A Glass (and Funds) for CUP (Center for Urban Pedagogy)

The Center or Urban Pedagogy (CUP), long one of the most provocative, insightful and productive non-profits in New York City, is holding its annual benefit event Thursday ,October 16th at The Green Building, 452 Union Street in Brooklyn. CUP uses the power of design and art to increase meaningful civic engagement. It has a long history of successful collaborations with designers, educators, advocates, students, and communities to make educational tools that "demystify complex policy and planning issues." There is not organization in New York more deserving of our support than CUP and tickets are now on sale for the evening of conversation, cocktails, and CUP projects! Get your tickets now! 
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And the Rome Prize Winners Are….

The American Academy in Rome announced the winners of the 116th annual Rome Prize Competition. Drawn from a variety of disciplines including musical composition, literature and design, fellowships have been awarded to 30 Italy-bound scholars. Randall Mason and Elizabeth Kaiser Schulte have been awarded the Historical Preservation and Conservation fellowships; Pablo Castro Estévez and William O'Brien Jr. for Architecture, and Ross Benjamin Altheimer and Karen M'Closkey for Landscape Architecture. Recipients of the 2012-2013 Rome Prizes are provided with a fellowship that includes a stipend, a study or studio, and room and board for a period of six months to two years in Rome, Italy. A more detailed list of the 2012-2013 Rome Prize winners follows: ANCIENT STUDIES National Endowment for the Humanities/Phyllis G. Gordan Post-Doctoral Rome Prize EMMA BLAKE Assistant Professor, School of Anthropology, University of Arizona Prelude to Rome: Networks and Ethnicities in Early Italy National Endowment for the Humanities/Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Post-Doctoral Rome Prize STEVEN J.R. ELLIS Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, University of Cincinnati The Roman Retail Industry: A contextual and interdisciplinary approach to its history and socio-economic role in the shaping of Roman urban space Arthur Ross Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize THOMAS HENDRICKSON Department of Classics, University of California, Berkeley Life and Libraries in Ancient Rome Andrew Heiskell Post-Doctoral Rome Prize BRENDA LONGFELLOW Associate Professor, School of Art & Art History, University of Iowa Past Lives, Present Meanings: Reused Statues in Imperial Rome Irene Rosenzweig/Samuel H. Kress Foundation/Helen M. Woodruff Fellowship of the Archaeological Institute of America Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize CLAUDIA MOSER Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University Material Witnesses: The Altars of Republican Rome and Latium and the Memory of Sacrifice Paul Mellon/Samuel H. Kress Foundation Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize (year one of a two-year fellowship) IRENE SAN PIETRO Department of Classical Studies, Columbia University Fasting, Prayer, Alms: Christian Virtue Theory and the Transition from Apostolic to Institutional Church Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize DENTON ALEXANDER WALTHALL Department of Art & Archaeology, Princeton University A Measured Harvest: Grain, Tithes, and Territories in Hellenistic and Roman Sicily (276-31 BCE) ARCHITECTURE James R. Lamantia, Jr., Rome Prize PABLO CASTRO ESTÉVEZ Principal, OBRA Architects, New York, NY Seeking a New Poetic of Dwelling: The Lessons of Modern Social Housing in Europe in the Early Twentieth Century Founders Rome Prize WILLIAM O’BRIEN, JR. Assistant Professor, Department of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Principal, William O'Brien, Jr., LLC, Cambridge, Massachusetts Anachronous Formalisms: The Renewed Novelty of Architectures of Rome DESIGN Katherine Edwards Gordon Rome Prize ERIK ADIGARD Founder and Designer, M-A-D Lecturer, California College of the Arts From Stones to Cloud: the entropy of image Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Rome Prize NICHOLAS BLECHMAN Art Director, The New York Times, New York, NY Nozone XI: Indigestion (The Food Issue) HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND CONSERVATION National Endowment for the Arts Rome Prize RANDALL MASON Associate Professor, Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania Gustavo Giovannoni’s Urban Conservation Booth Family Rome Prize ELIZABETH KAISER SCHULTE Owner/Chief Conservator, Elizabeth Kaiser Schulte Conservation of Art and Historic Artifacts on Paper, Atlanta, GA Changing Views of Rome Through the Eyes of Tourists and Mapmakers: Creation, Preservation, Education LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Prince Charitable Trusts Rome Prize ROSS BENJAMIN ALTHEIMER Landscape Architecture Studio Leader, Hammel Green and Abrahamson, Minneapolis, MN Welds and Quips in Subterranean Rome Garden Club of America Rome Prize KAREN M’CLOSKEY Assistant Professor, Department of Landscape Architecture, University of Pennsylvania A Field Guide to Rome: Baedeker and Beyond LITERATURE John Guare Writer’s Fund Rome Prize, a gift of Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman LUCY CORIN Associate Professor, Department of English, University of California, Davis BELL Joseph Brodsky Rome Prize, a gift of the Drue Heinz Trust/American Academy of Arts and Letters JESSICA FISHER Holloway Post-Doctoral Fellow in Poetry and Poetics, University of California, Berkeley A lyric essay, Defect, and a book that draws on aspects of fresco painting, tentatively titled Daywork MEDIEVAL STUDIES Millicent Mercer Johnsen Post-Doctoral Rome Prize JOSHUA COLIN BIRK Assistant Professor, Department of History, Smith College Baptized Sultans: The Norman Kings of Sicily & the Birth of the Anti-Islamic Critique MODERN ITALIAN STUDIES Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Post-Doctoral Rome Prize DOMINIQUE KIRCHNER REILL Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Miami Rebel City: Fiume's Challenge To Wilson's Europe, 1918-1924 Marian and Andrew Heiskell Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize BETH SAUNDERS Department of Art History, The Graduate Center of the City University of New York Developing Italy: Photography, History, and National Identity during the Risorgimento, 1839-1855 Donald and Maria Cox/Samuel H. Kress Foundation Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize (year two of a two-year fellowship) CAMILLE S. MATHIEU Department of the History of Art, University of California, Berkeley Revolutionizing the Antique: French Artists and Artistic Community in Napoleonic Rome, 1803-1819 MUSICAL COMPOSITION Luciano Berio Rome Prize ANTHONY CHEUNG Junior Fellow, Society of Fellows, Harvard University SynchroniCities for Chamber Ensemble with Electronics; A 20th Century Genealogy of Transcription (Aide-mémoire, Pedagogy, Recording, and the Jazz Canon) Elliott Carter Rome Prize JESSE JONES DMA Candidate, Department of Music, Cornell University Of the Soul RENAISSANCE AND EARLY MODERN STUDIES Lily Auchincloss Post-Doctoral Rome Prize PATRICK BAKER Senior Lecturer, Department of Medieval and Neo-Latin Philology, University of Münster The Roots of the ars historica in Fifteenth-Century Italy Robert Lehman Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize PETER JONATHAN BELL Institute of Fine Arts, New York University The Reinvention of the Bronze Statuette in Renaissance Italy: Presentation, Material, Facture Samuel H. Kress Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize (year one of a two-year fellowship) MARI YOKO HARA McIntire Department of Art, University of Virginia Places of Performance: Scenography, Painting, and Architecture of Baldassarre Peruzzi VISUAL ARTS Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize POLLY APFELBAUM Artist, New York, NY Critic, Graduate Fine Arts Department, School of Visual Arts and Art Institute of Chicago Rome and the flatbed picture plane Henry W. and Marian T. Mitchell Rome Prize CARL D’ALVIA Artist, West Cornwall, CT Metamorphosis and Grotesquerie John Armstrong Chaloner/Jacob H. Lazarus-Metropolitan Museum of Art Rome Prize GLENDALYS MEDINA Artist, New York, NY The Shank comes to Rome! Chuck Close Rome Prize NARI WARD Artist, New York, NY Professor, Department of Art, Hunter College, City University of New York If You See Something, Sense Something    
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Aga Khan Award for Architecture Prize Doubles

The Aga Khan Award for Architecture, awarded every three years to projects that set new standards of excellence in architecture, planning, landscape architecture, and historic preservation, has announced its prize will double to $1 million. The Award, which seeks projects that address the needs of societies in which Muslims have a significant presence, typically goes to projects that innovate the use of local resources and technology. Recent winners have focused on improving public spaces in rural societies and communities on the outskirts of urban centers. His Highness the Aga Khan explained in a statement, “One of the important aspects of the Award is that winners should be able to reposition their future with the support they get from the Award, both professionally and institutionally.”
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Another $9 Million Banked for Chicago’s Newest Linear Park

Today, Mayor Emanuel announced an additional $9 million in pledges for the Bloomingdale Trail, completing funding for the first phase of the elevated rails to trails project, according to the Sun-Times. The funds include a $5 million gift from Excelon, $1 million each from Boeing and CNA, and a $2 million commitment from the city, which, combined with $37 million in federal funds, will cover the $46 million cost of the first phase. The city and park advocates hope to raise an additional $36 million to complete the project, mostly through private, corporate, and foundation sources.
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Vikings Commit to Minneapolis…If They Get A New Stadium

It's a story that's been told in city after city. If you build it, they won't leave. Professional sports teams hold cities hostage, playing on the loyalty of fans to get expensive, taxpayer-funded facilities, while displaying little civic loyalty of their own. Anyway! In Minneapolis, the Vikings have said they won't decamp for Los Angeles if the city and state agree to help build a new $975 million stadium on the site of the Metrodome, according to the Star-Tribune. The new Metrodome would be built in time for the 2016 season, but only if the state agrees to a $398 million subsidy and the city agrees to forgo $150 in hospitality taxes. Details about the design are sketchy at best. A rendering presented at the press conference was developed by HKS Architects several years ago, though an aerial rendering differs somewhat from the HKS design.
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Whew! EPA Declares Chicago’s Air is Still Dirty

Most people would think that politicians would want their cities to be declared in compliance with Clean Air Act standards, but not Chicago! Illinois Governor Quinn and others the EPA lobbied to make sure  Chicago is counted as having dirty air, in spite of initial findings from that Chicago's pollution levels had improved significantly from 2008 to 2010. Why? Money of course! According to Crain's, a cleaner air ruling would have jeopardized up to $80 million in funding for projects to promote cleaner air, including transit upgrades and bike paths. While the logic is mind-bending, at least it means better public transportation and biking options!
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Ahoy! Treasure in the Gowanus Muck!

The Enviornmental Protection Agency is beginning its analysis and cleanup of the filthy yet fascinating Gowanus canal. It's proving to be full of all kinds of junk, including horrendous carcinogenic chemicals and, as the Brooklyn Paper reports, a 60 foot long sunken ship! Located where Fifth Street meets the canal, the wooden ship likely dates from the 19th century, the channel's shipping heyday. What we're calling the S.S. Superfund was discovered through sonar scanning, its outline is clearly visible in the image above. This is the second time in a year that New York's maritime past has resurfaced. Last summer another submerged ship was found buried at the World Trade Center site.
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Competing Visions for Chicago, Big and Small

Two new competitions of note explore possible futures for Chicago's public realm. The 2011 Burnham Prize ideas competition sponsored by AIA Chicago and the Chicago Architectural Club calls for new visions for the McCormick Place East building, the 1971 modernist covention center on the lakefront designed by Gene Summers of C.F. Murphy Associates. The massive, Miesian building has a powerful presence on the lakefront, and a vast column-free interior, but parks advocates have long contended it should be removed. Meanwhile, the building's owner, the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority, says it needs $150 million in repairs and is functionally obsolete. The competition aims to inspire new dialogue around the future of the building and site. The Street Furniture 2011 competition sponsored by Architecture for Humanity's Chicago chapter aims for something more universal, new street furniture that could be deployed to activate almost any vacant site. With a $1000 budget in mind, the competition calls for a piece or pieces of street furniture that could activate an open lot for a year in anticipation of future development as a garden. The furniture could then also be moved to a new site. The winning design will be built and installed at an unnamed location.
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Driehaus Awards the Much-Awarded Stern

The University of Notre Dame School of Architecture announced that Robert A. M. Stern has been named this year's Richard H. Driehaus laureate. The prize, which comes with a $200,000 purse, "honors the best practitioners of traditional, classical, and sustainable architecture and urbanism in the modern world," according to a statement. Founded in 2003, the prize has previously honored lesser known architects such as Rafael Manzano Martos of Spain and Abdel-Wahed El-Wakil of Egypt in addition to marquee American traditional and classicist architects like Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk and Allan Greenberg (several Driehaus recipients have also won or been involved in the National Building Museum's Vincent Scully Prize). Stern's office told AN that he will donate his award to Yale, where he is the Dean of the School of Architecture. Stern's career has covered furniture design, residences, skyscrapers, civic buildings, and town plans, in a variety of historical and modern styles. He is also a noted architectural historian, particularly for his collection of books on New York City. The Comcast Center in Philadelphia is Stern's tallest building to date, and one of his most unabashedly modern designs, though the Driehaus committee was quick to point out its resemblance to an obelisk. Stern designed the masterplan for Celebration Florida, a New Urbanist community originally developed by Disney. Detractors have called the project "sprawl in drag." 15 Central Park West is now one of the New York's most expensive addresses. Stern adapted the forms and style of early classic 20th century apartment houses for contemporary life. The Nashville public library was completed in 2001. A neo-classical residence in Seaside, Florida, the first New Urbanist community, completed in 2006. Robert A. M. Stern.
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Dyson Awards Aim to Improve Society Through Design

Copenhagen 1 The brief for the James Dyson Award design competition is deceptively simple: Design something that solves a problem. The winner and nine finalists representing the United States all responded with highly functional designs that could make a positive impact on the way we live, none more so than the U.S. winner, the Copenhagen Wheel, designed by Christine Outram and students in the SENSEable City Lab at MIT. The hybrid battery-powered disk turns any bike into an electric boosted bike, helping cyclists go longer distances and ride up hills. Like hybrid cars, the wheel generates energy from the brakes and stores them in batteries for later use by the motor, which assists the manual pedals on hills. Copenhagen 8 All the parts are concealed within the disk. The project was initiated in part by the city government of Copenhagen to further boost the already astonishing 35 percent of the city's population that bikes daily. The design team is working with an italian company to take the wheels from prototypes into production. Each wheel is expected to cost around $600. Other U.S. finalists include Empower by Me, a refillable HIV/AIDS medical kit designed by Jamie Perin of Ohio State University. Empower 1 The kit contains nutritional bars, aspirin, antiretroviral drugs, and a timing device to release pills according to the dosing schedule. The kits can be assembled with inexpensive materials and can cut down on the number of clinic visits. The Parquinho play equipment, designed by Mariana de Salles Ewell of Metropolitan State College, meets the needs of children with autism as well as those without disabilities, as well as facilitate interaction between both groups. The system includes elements like rollers and stairs that are used by occupational therapists to treat sensory disorders. Parquinho 1 Kee to Safe Driving, designed by George Ressler of the University of Kansas, prevents cellphone-related car accidents by requiring the driver to insert the phone into the unit before the ignition will start. Kee 2 Mantis, by Leah Kenttamaa-Squires, is a portable dental chair that doubles as a dolly, making it ideal for non-profit or disaster-relief settings. Mantis 1 Public Bicycle Security System, by Heman Au of the Academy of Art University in Long Beach, CA, includes a retractable cable lock, alarm, and stand attached to a case. The system is accessed with a pre-registered security card so that the owners contact information and the bike's serial number is available to the police in case of the theft. Public Bicycle 2 Seakettle, designed by Kimberly Hoffman of the Academy of Art University in Worchester, MA, is a life raft with a built in desalination system. The raft provides shelter and enough water fresh water for five passengers. Seakettle 1 Travel Pack, by ChangTing Tsai or the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, is a bycicle case for international travel. The case can hold an entire disassbled bike and then when you arrive in you destination can be reconfigured into to small side cases, called panniers. Travel pack 1 Guardian, Nick Boyd of Ohio State University, is an easy to use, safe fire extinguisher and case. Guardian 1 Purify, by Gabriel Collins from Metropolitan State College, is a handwashing station for hospitals and clinics. Built up the Dyson Air blade dryer, Purify also includs air driven water systems. Purify 1 Christine from MIT will travel to the UK to tour the Dyson manufacturing facility. Her designed will be judged against finalists from 18 other countries. The grand prize winner will receive $15,000 and an addition $15,000 will go to the design program at the winning student's school.
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Hefty Bill for AT&T

In April, a seven foot tall presentation drawing of the AT&T building was purchased by the Victoria and Albert Museum in London for $71,000, one of the highest prices ever paid for a "modern architectural drawing," according to a release. The Philip Johnson drawing was sold through the Wright auction house in Chicago, which has become a specialist in selling architectural materials. The V&A will show the piece in an upcoming exhibition on postmodernism. It is one of only a handful of works by an American in the museum's 35,000 piece architecture collection. The building is famous for its "Chippendale" top, which, when it opened in 1984, signaled the ascendency of postmodernism and the return of historical styles and classical references to the architectural vocabulary. The drawing is part of a larger archive of Johnson's work, which includes thousands of drawings, plans, and photographs of AT&T, Pennzoil Place, PPG Place, and the Chrystal Cathedral. The owner of the archive wishes to remain anonymous, according to the release.
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Parks Advocates Picked for Jacobs Medals

Central Park Conservancy founder Elizabeth Barlow Rogers and Friends of the High Line founders Joshua David and Robert Hammond will receive this year's Jane Jacobs Medals, presented by the Municipal Art Society and the Rockefeller Foundation. Rogers founded the Central Park Conservancy in 1980 and served in the dual position of president and park administrator till 1995. The conservancy became a model for public/private park restorations that has been emulated nationwide. Since its inception, the conservancy has raised $500 million for restoration and maintenance of the park. A writer and scholar on landscape history, Rogers is currently the head of the Foundation for Landscape Studies, another organization she founded. She will donate her entire $80,000 prize to the Foundation. David and Hammond fought successfully to preserve the High Line, which was slated for demolition during the Giuliani administration. Enlisting the support of politicians, gallerists, celebrities, and the public, they raised raised awareness, and millions, to transform the dilapidated structure into one of the country's most innovative urban parks. Friends of the High Low now operates as a conservancy and will to cover 70% of the High Line's operating costs. The High Line's second phase is now under construction. Hammond and David will each receive $60,000 and will each donate $20,000 to the Friends.