Posts tagged with "Long Island":

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North Fork architecture to be displayed in exhibit curated by Barry Bergdoll

This fall, the Cutchogue New Suffolk Library will be hosting an exhibition on the modernist homes sweeping North Fork, a beach community on New York's Long Island. A New Wave of Modern Architecture on the North Fork will catalogue the work of six architects and firms who have completed modernist projects across the enclave. Columbia art history professor Barry Bergdoll previously curated Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive at the Museum of Modern Art. A New Wave of Modern Architecture on the North Fork will open with a wine and cheese reception on September 7 and will run through September and October at the library’s rotating exhibition space, the Upstairs Gallery. The architects featured will include SO-ILShenton Architects, Joseph Tanney and Robert Luntz from Resolution: 4 Architecture, who specialize in prefabricated modern homes, William Ryall of Ryall Sheridan Architects, Richard Gluckman of Gluckman Tang ArchitectsAllan Wexler, and John Berg of Berg Design Architecture. New York design firm 2x4 will be designing the exhibition, and the Friends of the Cutchogue New Suffolk Library, a group of patrons and businesses who support and help program events at the library, will be hosting the event. While the bulk of the exhibition will cover work in the area designed after the year 2000, homes by Tony Smith and the sharply-angled houses of Charles Moore will be mentioned on a text panel at the show's entrance.
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WXY unveils spiffy cabin prototypes for New York State parks

Cabins and tiny houses seem to be cropping up everywhere, from country homes to affordable housing. In Wildwood State Park on Long Island, New York City–based WXY Architecture + Urban Design has designed a cabin prototype, the NYS cabin, specifically for the Long Island campground. While the usual image of a cabin in the woods is claustrophobic, window-starved and lacking in amenities, WXY’s design is anything but. The contemporary one- and two-bedroom cabins range in size from over 600 to nearly 800 square feet and feature tall, sloping ceilings, flexible floor plans, full kitchens, and naturally lit interiors. The exteriors of the cabins are clad in cedar shingles, with reclaimed mahogany detailing and metal roofing, allowing the structures to fit seamlessly in with existing Works Progress Administration (WPA) cabins that date from the 1930s. Designed to function across similar New York State campgrounds, WXY’s straightforward update of a classic design may very well end up in your neck of the woods. Claire Weisz, a principal of WXY, told Dwell the cabins were meant to be "robust, chunky, and larger in scale," with sparse detailing that will allow the structures to "silver out" with age.  This is not the first time architects have forayed into the nation's park system. Minneapolis-based HGA won the 2016 American architectural award for its stylish cabins on concrete piers in Dakota County, Minnesota.
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2017 Best of Design Awards for Unbuilt – Residential

2017 Best of Design Award for Unbuilt – Residential: 14 White Street Architect: DXA Studio with Nava Location: New York
Located in the Tribeca East Historic District, 14 White Street is a 30,000-square-foot mixed-use building clad in a distinctive patinated copper alloy panel. This contemporary metal envelope establishes a dialogue with the neighboring cast-iron manufacturing buildings through subtle references to proportions, cadence, and texture. Each panel is acid-etched with the very line work used during fabrication. The panel’s angles and resultant etching vary from window to window, capitalizing on the ease of customization in automated digital fabrication and allowing for smaller apertures for private spaces like bedrooms and bathrooms, and larger for public areas like living and dining rooms. It will be an ultra-efficient build- ing with high-performance windows and a hyper-insulated rainscreen envelope beneath its metal-clad exterior. "In a city with an increasing number of one-off icons, it's refreshing to see a building that unapologetically situates its inventiveness at the scale of the detail, resulting in an elegant, cohesive whole.” —Eric Bunge, Principal, nArchitects (juror)   Honorable Mention  Project: Long Island City Oyster Architect: Carlos Arnaiz Architects (CAZA)  Location: New York LIC Oyster addresses the imbalance of a high-rise residential boom amidst the steady retreat of manufacturing in NYC, reinterpreting the local aesthetic of brick arches as a shell-shaped development on the Queens Waterfront. LIC Oyster’s built footprint occupies 55 percent of the total site area, leaving a public park measuring over 2.5 acres.   Honorable Mention  Project: Necklace Residence Architect: REX Location: Long Island, New York This residence is organized into a necklace of five homes and three shared pavilions for events, entertainment, and children’s play. The family compound’s exterior is wrapped in mirror glass to make it disappear into the site upon approach, reducing the perception of its large mass. A circular walkway overlooking the courtyard garden connects all the residence’s gems.
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SHoP and Gensler revamp the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Long Island

The New York offices of SHoP Architects and Gensler have teamed up to bring the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Long Island back to life. As part of a $165 million renovation, SHoP worked on the facade aspect of the design while Gensler configured the interior. Billy Joel will inaugurate the venue tomorrow with a concert. The Coliseum first opened in 1972, but after 40 years of being the Islanders' ice hockey home, the arena had fallen into a being a shadow of its former self. Developer Forest City Ratner Companies took on the task in 2013, teaming up with SHoP. The two firms had previously worked together on the Barclays Center in Brooklyn and their second collaborative project appears to have produced a facade of similar standing. Comprising 4,700 brushed aluminum fins, the facade gently undulates upon a horizontal axis as it wraps around the Coliseum. This is achieved by altering the fins' angled vertices incrementally. According to a press release, the material references Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis—the first non-stop solo transatlantic flight which took off nearby. The interior, meanwhile, makes use of the infused daylight from a new exterior glass storefront which illuminates a redesigned concourse, main entrance, and circulatory areas. New seating has also been installed within the 416,000-square-foot space. In addition to this, a new VIP Club and Blue Moon Beer Garden have also been installed as event amenity spaces. For performers, "residential style living spaces" are part of the venue's "Artist Quarters." 1,500 staff are set to work at the Coliseum which will also double-up as a home for the Brooklyn Nets’ NBA Development League affiliate, the Long Island Nets, as well as hosting family shows, sports, and outdoor festivals. “Our goal was to create a space that reflected the tremendous sense of place that permeates Long Island, from the look of the building, to the taste of the food,” said Bruce Ratner, executive chairman of Forest City Ratner Companies, the developer of the new venue in a press release. “Our talented architectural and development team have succeeded beyond our dreams, creating a venue that is visually striking and wonderfully comfortable. We’re excited about the opening and are looking forward to the ongoing development of this entertainment destination.”
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Mayor de Blasio’s $2.75-per-ride ferry service to begin summer 2017

Expanding on the East River Ferry system, Mayor de Blasio will see his $55 million plan for a five borough ferry network come to fruition summer 2017.  At $2.75-a-ride, the system will be managed and operated by a California company, Hornblower, that has a proven track record in the industry, having run services in New York for ten years. Currently, the ferry caters to Manhattan residents and those on the shoreline between DUMBO, Brooklyn and Long Island City, Queens. The network will be expanded to escort people to Astoria, Queens; Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn; and the Rockaways, Queens. Come 2018, Soundview will service the Upper and Lower East Side. Another proposal looks to extend the service further to Staten and Coney Island, though no completion date has yet been penned in. The cost of a ferry trip will align with the price of a single subway ride. Bicycles may be carried on for an extra dollar. This is less than half of what it costs for a standard weekend ferry fare at the moment. Such a pricing scheme is no accident, either, as de Blasio has his eyes on integrating the network with the rest of the MTA system. According to de Blasio, commuters will be able to enjoy the "fresh air, harbor views, and a fast ride on the open water" on the 20-minute journey between Astoria and Manhattan's East 34th Street, as well as being able to make the most of the ferry on the hour-long commute between the Rockaways and Wall Street. “Today I applaud Mayor de Blasio for his $55 million capital commitment to a 5-borough ferry system and declaring that New York City’s waterfront will be open for all. The ripple effect from this service will be felt throughout the entire city from Bay Ridge to Bayside; from Staten Island to Soundview,” said Councilman Vincent Gentile. “Access to a true 5-borough ferry system will be just another jewel to add to our crown here in southwest Brooklyn, one that will be a boon to small businesses and real estate alike.”
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Vice President Biden and Governor Cuomo announce design competition for New York City’s airports

If you’re not a fan of Auntie Anne’s Pretzels, then LaGuardia Airport really has nothing to offer you. Besides travel-friendly food options like “jalapeño and cheese pretzel dogs" the aging, dirty, sometimes-leaking airport is by all accounts a disaster. Just ask Vice President Joe Biden who once said that if he blindfolded someone and took them to LaGuardia they would think they were in “some third world country.” The Vice President adding, "I'm not joking." A few months after the Veep made that non-joke, he appeared alongside New York Governor Andrew Cuomo to announce design competitions to revamp LaGuardia and JFK, as well as the smaller Republic Airport on Long Island and Stewart Airport in the Hudson Valley. Those competitions will be launched in 30 days and last for 60 days; three finalists will be awarded $500,000. The New York Observer reported that the governor wants to see better retail and restaurant options at the airports (move over Auntie Anne's!), a Long Island Railroad link and ferry connection to LaGuardia, faster rail connections to JFK, and tax-free zones around Republic and Stewart airports. At LaGuardia, at least, the results could possibly look like the totally non-official rendering above. How would any of these changes be funded? That’s a question the governor did not address at the event. According to the Observer, "[Cuomo] did not tell reporters how the cash-strapped state, Port Authority or Metropolitan Transportation Authority would pay for these upgrades, but told reporters all options ‘were on the table,’ including new tolls on bridges.'” Cuomo later told the New York Times that designs had to be selected before financing could be secured, and he deflected criticism that his competition would get in the way of the Port Authority's multi-billion-dollar plan to overhaul LaGuardia's main terminal. There's no word yet on who will oversee that project, or what it will entail, but the Port Authority's very announcement of its plans earlier this year led to the exciting, but entirely unsolicited, completely non-official rendering at top.
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Architects propose sunken forest to protect and restore the Rockaways

A proposal for a dense forest along the Rockaways shoreline in New York City could boost storm resiliency in the area. Local Office Landscape and Urban Design, led by Walter Meyer and Jennifer Bolstad, has proposed the forest along the Robert Moses roadway in Rockaway, Queens. The so-called “Rockaway East Resiliency Preserve” would turn the storm-weary Rockaways into a blooming, natural location. The Rockaway East Resiliency Preserve is among the projects adding to the more general plan to install structures and natural objects to better protect the city's coastal areas against future storms. Prior to the arrival of Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the Shore Front parkway stood between the boardwalk and the rest of the residential areas. The parkway, albeit large and four-lanes wide, was rarely used and is on Meyer’s agenda of places to renovate and re-purpose. Meyer intends to take half of this parkway and create an area filled with dunes and trees as a solution to any future problems involving natural disasters. This dune system will house trees of pitch pine, that, when fully grown, will grow thick roots into the ground which will interlock with each other. Once planted, however, these trees will need to or three years in order to be strong and durable. The nature preserve will be well sunken, and will act as an efficient water basin in case of a flood. Meyer has stated his intentions to lower areas of this nature preserve to different heights so as to create an effective dune system. The preserve will also house wetlands and freshwater habitats for animals as well as to quickly absorb water from a flooding. The proposal is currently under review by the Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD), and has garnered the support of some local politicians. City Councilman Donovan Richards has taken to supporting the proposal, and stated he would be speaking with HPD department to get this project passed.
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Four Architectural Firms to Reimagine Parking on Long Island

In finalizing a key component of the Long Island Index’s 2014 effort to explore innovations for Long Island’s downtown area parking facilities, Build a Better Burb: ParkingPLUS Design Challenge has revealed the chosen architectural firms to take on the venture. The Rauch Foundation’s project goal is to investigate new parking design concepts that integrate local amenities and transform parking facilities into architectural attractions. The four firms—dub studios, LTL Architects, Roger Sherman Architecture + Urban Design, and Utile, Inc.—will individually tackle downtown needs in one of four Long Island communities: Patchogue, Rockville Centre, Ronkonkoma, and Westbury. Each community will collaborate with a selected architectural firm to pinpoint prospective sites. With more than 4,000 acres of surface parking lots in Long Island’s downtowns, the chance to re-imagine parking will hopefully encourage residents to contribute to the process. The Design Challenge seeks to stimulate innovative thinking about the area’s mass transit-served downtowns. The Long Island Index’s online journal of suburban design, Build a Better Burb, will be the principal site for public discussion about the designs. Each of the winning architectural teams will receive design stipends and will have six weeks to complete their designs, which will be revealed in January by the Long Island Index. The firms and their corresponding communities are:
  • dub studios, Patchogue
  • LTL Architects, Westbury
  • Roger Sherman Architecture + Urban Design, Ronkonkoma
  • Utile, Inc., Rockville Centre
Nancy Rauch Douzinas, President of the Rauch Foundation, said in a statement that the search “produced some of the most creative firms in the nation for this challenge. We hope that the designs that emerge will both project the transformative potential of the specific sites in these communities and inspire a broader discussion on Long Island of the inventively positive presence that parking facilities could provide.”
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Forest City Ratner and SHoP to Revive Aging Nassau Coliseum

The team behind Brooklyn's Barclays Center—Forest City Ratner and SHoP Architects—will join forces again to overhaul the run-down Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Uniondale, Long Island. The developer beat out the competition, Madison Square Garden Co, and took home the prize: the commission to manage and rehabilitate the 41-year old crumbling arena that has been home to the Islanders since the hockey team was first founded in 1972. The Islanders will be moving their franchise to the Barclays Center in 2014. The Wall Street Journal reported that Bruce Ratner expects the entire renovation will cost an estimated $229 million, but will require no public funding. The rent from the arena, along with ticket sales and other deals, will generate roughly $195 million over the period of its 34-year lease. Madison Square Garden, however, projected that they would raise $112 million within the same timeframe. The proposal calls for slashing 5,000 seats from the arena and for a new undulating facade designed to emulate the landscape of Long Island, with visual references to the dunes, beach fencing and boardwalks. Ratner also plans to add a new plaza, theaters, restaurants, and bowling alley, and outdoor concert venue to the 77-acre site.
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Waterfront Gateway Design Competition: New Rochelle, NY To Launch Important Architecture Competition June 19

The City of New Rochelle, New York, is announcing the start of an exciting new competition to re-imagine its waterfront and downtown communities. Founded in 1688 by a craftsman from La Rochelle, France, New Rochelle, sits on the shore of Long Island Sound just a few miles north of New York City. A diverse, highly livable, and walkable place, the city has made great strides in recent years to rehabilitate its infrastructure and historic downtown. However, there is only a single block in the commercial quarter that touches on the shore of Long Island Sound. This is the site of the competition. In order to take advantage of this valuable waterfront, the city is sponsoring the three-part Waterfront Gateway Design Competition, which will officially launch tomorrow, Thursday at noon. Located at the edge of downtown and surrounding residential communities, the 2.92-acre plot is on historic highway Route 1. The site is home to a 1931 armory that has been abandoned for many years. It is also on an important promontory overlooking Long Island Sound's Echo Bay. This competition seeks creative and innovative proposals for the design, planning, and re-imaging of the site, as well as two adjacent parcels on Echo Bay. It is anticipated that the winning proposal, which will be selected by a high-profile jury of architects, planners, and public officials, will become the basis for the development of the site. We believe this is the most important competition to take place in Westchester County in many years. The competition website with more details on how to enter launches tomorrow, so stay tuned for your chance to make a lasting impact in New Rochelle. The competition concludes November 22, 2013.
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Quick Clicks> Demolition Roundup and a Fortress, Too

Land's Literal End. A sprawling 25-room colonial mansion called Land's End on Long Island's North Shore has been torn down. Gothamist and Curbed link to a CBS video of the destruction of the house said to have inspired the decadence of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. Fortress in Disguise. Shortlist found a house that can transform itself from a windowless cube of a fortress into a modern luxury mansion with the press of a button. The appropriately named Safe House was designed by KWK Promes architecture Treme Teardown. Preservationists in New Orleans are pushing to save the 1950s-era Phillis Wheatley elementary school designed by Charles Colbert from the wrecking ball. The Times Picayune reports that Tulane architects and a Treme actress are leading the call. The Urban 30. We're tickled to be named in OCU's list of 30 Best Blogs for Urban Planning Students! Renewal 2.0. The NY Times ran a recent story about the proposed rebuilding of Quincy, Mass. The public-private partnership would tear town most of the city's urban core and start over again with a massive roughly $1.5 billion project to create a new downtown. While the article doesn't articulate what would be lost, it does speculate on the size of the real estate gamble if the project falls through.
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Suburbia: The Next Generation

It's official. The suburbs are here to stay. Now we just need to figure out what to do with them. At least that's the premise of the Build A Better Burb competition that we told you about back in July, when entries submitted by architects, urban designers, planners, visionaries and students, all vying for $22,500 in prizes, were slimmed down to 23 finalists. And the winners are...

AgIsland This ambitious entry has Long Island reclaiming its agrarian roots, replacing office parks with farms. It also calls for consolidating and relocating 9 million square feet of office space along Route 110, utilizing a transit-oriented model.

Building C-Burbia Landscape designers created "an infrastructure system for short-term biomass storage and formation of long-term soil carbon reservoirs in suburban landscape."

Levittown: Increasing Density and Opportunity through the Accessory Dwellings One problem of suburban life in the NYC metro area is a lack of affordable housing options. One solution proposed here is to allow a homeowner to maximize the buildable area of his/her lot, preferably by using modular forms (instead of timber) the structure can expand and contract as needs change.

Long Division This vision of a sustainable Long Island starts with a regional plan that aims to preserve the island's aquifer, maximize transportation, and targets several underutilized downtowns for growth. The plan calls for new typologies of space combined with planned voids.

SUBHUB Transit System Transit doesn't always go where people need it to and is sometimes too big for it's own good. Instead, a more walkable and extensive micro-infrastructure that consists of re-imagined transit, a HUB at existing train stations where people and goods transfer to a smaller shuttle system, and SUBHUBs at existing public schools is envisioned for Long Island.

The winning student submission is: Upcycling 2.0 These Columbia University students target the ubiquitous suburban typologies -- single family house, strip mall, train station, street medians, big box stores, endless parking lots -- and re-appropriates them.

The winning Long Island Index People’s Choice Award, selected by the public, goes to: LIRR: Long Island Radically Rezoned Long Island becomes Living Island by re-densifying the residential fabric,  re-centering public space around train stations, and chopping up underused parking surfaces into small blocks that are a more appropriate fit for scale of the neighborhood.

While the Long Island Index originally anticipated having a first prize and multiple other winners, the jurors felt that the winning submissions were all strong and decided to honor the top designs equally.  Therefore, $20,000 will be split among the top five designs; each will receive $4,000: The student prize was $2,500. ( The “People’s Choice Award” did not have a cash prize.)

Winning entries will be on view at The Long Island Museum from October 8th-October 24th and at The Long Island Children’s Museum from October 5th-October 31st.