Posts tagged with "living wall":

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Leafy tower sprouts in Singapore’s Central Business District

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The Oasia Downtown is a mixed-use office and hotel tower designed by Singapore-based architecture firm WOHA, which set out to create “an alternative imagery for commercial high-rise developments.” Clad in a saturating orange and red metal screen living wall system, the building combines innovative ways to intensify land use with a tropical approach that showcases a perforated, permeable, furry, verdant tower of green in the heart of Singapore’s Central Business District.
  • Architects WOHA
  • Facade Installer Jinyue Aluminum Engineering (S) Pte Ltd (curtain wall);  Century Construction & Engineering Pte Ltd (facade mesh)
  • Location Singapore
  • Date of Completion 2016
  • System Expanded aluminum mesh on galvanized steel frame; Galvanized steel mesh ledge with fiberglass planters (Roof); RC ledge with fiberglass planters (Building); RC structure and Curtain wall (Building)
  • Products Expanded aluminum mesh in powder coated finish
WOHA said the Oasia’s living wall serves as an aesthetic and functional buffer between the surrounding cityscape and the building, creating a layer of shade, absorbing heat, and providing cover. 21 varieties of creeping plants were ultimately used on the project to adapt to various environmental solar conditions responsive to light and shade. “Some produce colorful flowers that will attract birds and insects at different times of the year. The facade is also extended down to the ground, creating possibilities for small animals (such as squirrels) to climb up the building and use it as a vertical habitat.” Together with 33 different species of trees and shrubs on the sky terraces, there is a total of 54 species within this building that attract biodiversity and support ecosystems. This variety also provides natural resilience against disease and bugs, ensuring a more healthy long-term system. The building's structure is constructed of a reinforced concrete frame wrapped in a three-layer building envelope assembly: an internal curtain wall, prefabricated fiberglass planters set on an integrated reinforced concrete ledge, and an expanded aluminum mesh that serves as a climbing base for greenery. Planters tap into an automatic irrigation system and are positioned within easy reach of an inner ring of maintenance catwalks located on every floor of the tower. This architecture provides simple, low-tech maintenance avoiding the need for costly specialized care. The architects said the programming of the tower is analogous to a club sandwich, a stacked typology where distinct floors of offices and hotel rooms are sandwiched between elevated “sky gardens.” Rather than relying on external views of the surrounding city, the tower reorients views inward to a series of vertical urban-scaled verandahs. This openness also allows the wind to pass through the building for improved cross-ventilation. In this way, the public areas become functional, comfortable tropical spaces with greenery, natural light, and fresh air instead of enclosed, internalized air conditioned spaces. Living wall systems are not a new concept for WOHA, which has previously integrated a system onto a 36-story residential development called Newton Suites in 2007 and School of the Arts in 2010, with green plot ratios of 130 percent and 140 percent respectively. Green plot ratios measure the area of vegetation with respect to site area. In comparison to these projects, Oasia Downtown has achieved an 1100 percent green plot ratio, thanks for the extensive use of landscaping as an architectural surface treatment, both internally and externally throughout the building. The architects say the tower ultimately performs as a tropical, urbanistically sensitive and humanistic addition to the city. “We are interested in how green, vegetated facades and sky gardens can transform not just a building, but an entire neighborhood by creating visual relief while achieving psychological, as well as environmental benefits.”
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Diamond Schmitt Architects Cleanse Building with Vertical Living Wall

At six stories high, this is the tallest living Biofilter wall in North America.

Neatly contained behind a glass and steel structure is Diamond Schmitt Architects and Nedlaw Living Walls’ latest creation: a 1,370 s.f. vertical living wall assembly, located within a prominent skylit atrium in Vanier Hall, a Social Sciences building on the University of Ottawa’s campus. What appears as a vertical leafy green decorative wall is actually a sophisticated system fully integrated into the building’s air handling system. Contaminated indoor air is drawn through the filtration mechanism—made of plant and root media—where microorganisms consume airborne pollutants as food, breaking them down into water and carbon dioxide. The biofilter effectively cleanses over 13,800 CFM of air. Birgit Siber, Principal at Diamond Schmitt Architects, has incorporated over a dozen large living wall installations in her projects: “One of the things I find so elegant about the initiative of using plants on a large scale within buildings is that it contributes to the indoor environment on so many fronts.” Not only does the wall cleanse dust and odor from the indoor air, but in the atrium, the living wall frames the school’s collaborative social space and functions as an acoustical attenuation device. The living wall can be seen prominently from the exterior, contributing to the school’s identity. The cost of the assembly was determined to be “cost neutral” by the University’s administration, which is seeking a LEED Gold Certification for the building. Biofiltration is a product of research developed at the University of Guelph’s Controlled Environment System Research Facility (1.5 hours west of Toronto), and resulted from an investigation done for the International Space Agency to purify air at a proposed lunar base. Siber teamed with researcher Dr. Alan Darlington, founder of Nedlaw Living Walls, to develop an installation to showcase his research 12 years ago.
  • Facade Manufacturer Nedlaw Living Walls
  • Architects Diamond Schmitt Architects, KWC Architects
  • Facade Installer Nedlaw Living Walls
  • Facade Consultants Nedlaw Living Walls
  • Location Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Date of Completion September 2012
  • System synthetic growth media fed by remote hydroponic system connected to return air system of HVAC
  • Products custom components
From this early collaboration between Siber and Darlington, a “no waste” spirit has driven the development of the system, which continues to evolve through seven built versions.  Darlington attributes these developments to an underlying desire to improve building performance, “We’ve done a lot of work to streamline and make this as efficient as possible without losing the aesthetics of this system.” The wall at Vanier Hall is loaded with creative features to close the energy “loop holes” found in traditional building systems. Storm water runoff and HVAC condensation are captured and reused for watering the hydroponic plants, while a sophisticated daylight-integral lighting system limits electricity usage used for plant growth to adjust lighting conditions on the plants. The biofiltration living wall system is scalable, having been deployed by Diamond Schmitt Architects and Nedlaw Living Walls in city halls, offices, and universities. It has been developed in coordination with both new construction and renovation projects. Darlington notes that under ideal conditions, roughly 10 square feet of biofilters can generate enough “virtual” outside air for 5-10 people. Diamond Schmitt Architects currently have two US projects under construction – a mixed use tower in Buffalo, and a stacked sequence of four two-story living walls in an academic building at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Architect Birgit Siber of Diamond Schmitt Architects will be speaking at the upcoming Cities Alive conference in New York City on October 6th on a panel discussion from 10:30am-noon entitled, "Living Walls Biofilters: Design, Operating Costs and Return on Investment."
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Product> Water Retention Materials That Are Happy When Wet

The following selections can substantially aid in stormwater management, along roofs, walls, plazas, and more. Hybrid Green Roof System LiveRoof This modular roofing system features Moisture Portal technology and hidden tray lips that connect the roots of each vegetation unit for even water and nutrient distribution across the entire system. In times of excess precipitation, drain channels disperse water at seven gallons per minute for each linear foot. LiveRoof features mature grasses and perennials for a monolithic appearance, but with modular benefits for maintenance and ease of installation. It comes with a 20-year module warranty. Easiwall TreeBox TreeBox’s vertical green cladding panel is made from recycled poly-propylene with a waterproof barrier along a solid back panel. Measuring just under 11 feet squared, each panel weighs 34 pounds empty and can support 150 pounds—including a saturated substrate—when attached to a vertical surface via galvanized steel support rails. Easiwall absorbs 35 to 40 percent of soil volume in moisture. Its modular design is scalable to most building dimensions. Silva Cell DeepRoot The Silva Cell modular containment system transfers above-grade loads to a compacted sub-base. Increased root space serves as an on-site storm water management system and can hold up to 2 inches of storm water. Each 48-by-24-by-16-inch frame features approximately 92 percent void space for ample soil distribution and can accommodate under-ground utilities. Recently specified to support 33 Maples at Toronto’s Sugar Beach, landscape architect Marc Hallé reported that the trees “look they are on steroids. EcoPriora Unilock Multiple shapes and colors are available in Unilock’s new permeable pavers thanks to the introduction of new face mix technology. The rectangular and square pavers—large and small—feature tight joint tolerances compliant with ADA regulation. The pavers also support rapid storm water infiltration and they are strong enough to support commercial vehicular traffic. Enka Retain & Drain Bonar Enka Retain & Drain combines effective green roof drainage while promoting root health by retaining requisite moisture. Water retention material is constructed from 100 percent post-industrial recycled non-woven polypropylene that is designed to hold 15 times its weight in water and conforms to irregular surfaces and offsets. The drainage core is made up of 40 percent post-industrial recycled polypropylene filaments entangled in a square waffle pattern that creates an open flow path for water. Rainstore3 Invisible Structures Constructed from injection-molded plastic, Rainstore panels are suitable for stormwater storage and retention systems in driving areas and parking lots. Thirty-six vertical columns in each 40-by-40-by-4-inch unit store up to a total of 25 gallons of water, and can be stacked up to 24 high, accommodating more storage than chambers and pipes over a smaller surface area. Its open design also supports exfiltration of stormwater along the bottom and sides of the chamber. EPDM Geomembrane Firestone Building Products Suitable for critical containment jobs or decorative water features, EPDM Geomembrane is a flexible, easily installable water barrier for constructed wetlands, agricultural ponds, reservoirs, and landscape features. A variety of panel sizes can be specified and, with 300 percent elongation potential, the product can conform to irregular shapes and contours. It is compatible with Firestone’s QuickSeam Tape for seamless connections. It is also safe for fish and wildlife. HOG RainwaterHOG This 50-gallon storage tank can be connected vertically or horizontally to other HOGs for increased storage capacity. Constructed from a ¼-inch thick, food-grade plastic resin, the HOG can contain potable water as easily as irrigation or emergency stores. The cistern’s outlet is located on the floor of the tank rather than the side for easier access. Designed in Australia for warmer climates, it can withstand temperatures between 22 degrees and 140 degrees Fahrenheit, thanks to a UV8 stabilizer mixed into the resin.