Posts tagged with "live-work spaces":

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L.A. developer is bringing live-work units to Downtown Boise

With the 159-unit Fowler and 37-unit Water Cooler projects, Los Angeles–based developers Local Construct are expanding their horizons by building for a growing niche of budget-conscious transplants seeking classically urban qualities like walkability and affordable density in Boise, Idaho.

Casey Lynch, cofounder of Local Construct, explained that Boise is “more progressive in terms of land-use and transportation planning” than larger municipalities, which allowed the developer to implement and expand on its existing suite of best practices.

The firm’s seven-story Fowler, designed by Holst Architecture, is a subtly zigzagging complex that includes 4,000 square feet of ground-floor retail and five ground floor live-work units that allow residents to “live above the shop.” The iron-washed brick and troweled-stucco block features gridded facades made up of punched openings that overlook the street and a central courtyard.

Local Construct also partnered with package-handling start-up Parcel Pending to create a package room outfitted with refrigerated lockers that alert residents when their packages arrive.

The developer, with The Architects Office (TAO) and Beebe Skidmore, is simultaneously working on the three-story Water Cooler apartments, which features protruding plywood-clad sections interrupted by white stucco massing. The wood-siding-clad bump-outs overhang the ground level storefront spaces, providing shelter above the building’s entrances. The building will contain seven live-work units along the ground floor, and 900 square feet of retail.

Both complexes are far into the construction process and are expected to open to tenants later this year.

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This designer created a live-work prefab development for Detroit’s growing creative class

Detroit is full of surprises. From the Mies-designed Lafayette Park to the currently disassembled Heidelberg Project, small enclaves throughout the city challenge the perceived image of a city that has lost 60 percent of its population in the last 50 years. Tapping into this potential of small community spaces, Edwin Chan and his Los Angeles–based design practice EC3 have recently completed True North Detroit, a half-acre live-work community.

Specifically designed to cater to Detroit’s growing creative population, True North comprises nine lightweight prefabricated Quonset huts in the Core City neighborhood about two and a half miles northwest of the downtown. Core City has not seen any significant construction in over 60 years, and the area surrounding the project mostly consists of vacant lots.

“The majority of Detroit’s housing stock is either out of date or completely dilapidated,” Edwin Chan said. “Rather than being determined by ‘market demands,’ True North’s design is an inclusive and aspirational vision to create a new typology of affordable housing and to promote alternative, creative lifestyles in one of the world’s most iconic cities.”

The small complex of vaulted buildings is arranged in such a way as to provide access from the street and produce open outdoor communal spaces. Security, views, and privacy were also considered in the strategic orientation of each structure. The shape of the Quonset huts was also modified from the typical semicircular section to better serve the targeted residents.

Elongated and heightened wall space was produced for hanging art for production and exhibition. Kitchens, bathrooms, and utilities were moved into a center “island” and built out of a durable polycarbonate. Translucent and transparent polycarbonate was also used throughout to provide generous light and extra security. Radiant concrete floors, finished plywood, and other inexpensive materials and construction methods help keep the spaces affordable. The apartments range from 475 to 1,600 square feet, all with a lofted space above the kitchen area that can be used as a bedroom or additional workspace.

Even before its completion early this summer, True North received an honorable mention in the 64th annual P/A Awards in the community category. Far from the massive developments happening in the city’s downtown, projects like True North attempt to add to the city in more elegant way. As such, True North is the first of an iterative plan designed by EC3 to build on another seven acres in the neighborhood. It would seem that it is unavoidable that Detroit is going to be a testing ground for architectural and urban innovation. Projects like True North will hopefully prove that this can be a positive, and truly progressive, experience for the city.

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Studio One Eleven to bring 110-unit live-work complex to L.A.’s Arts District

Studio One Eleven has unveiled renderings for the 2110 Bay Development in Downtown Los Angeles. The 1.8-acre complex consists of three distinct buildings tied together via a mix of public and private open spaces, all sitting atop a three-level subterranean garage in L.A.’s Arts District. The project, located on a site adjacent to the recently-announced SoHo Warehouse private club, will continue the southern momentum catalyzed by that development as the Arts District’s physical boundaries continue to expand toward Interstate-10 block-by-block. Interstate 10 is widely seen as the far-southern border of Downtown Los Angeles, with a broad expanse of low, industrial buildings and warehouses standing between the previously-observed southern boundary of the Arts District along 7th Street and the freeway. The coffee roaster Stumptown opened a regional production facility and cafe a block south of 7th Street in 2013 and the area has been seeing steady activity since. The announcement late in 2015 of SoHo Warehouse’s arrival immediately codified that southward expansion, rising land values in the area overnight. The 2110 Bay lot was purchased in the heat of the moment by the project’s developer, Bay Capital Fund LLC, in April 2015 for $11 million. The new complex, located directly behind the forthcoming Warehouse, will include an 110-unit “live-work tower” of unspecified height as well as a 100,000 square foot office building and in excess of 50,000 square feet of commercial space. That commercial space will be housed in a repurposed industrial shed structure containing an outdoor mezzanine level. All of the structures will be similarly intertwined with exterior open spaces via exterior circulation and plazas. This includes the rooftops, as two of the structures, the tower and office structure, will host a pool and restaurant, respectively. Renderings released by the firm show a bricolage of materials and formal strategies for the complex, with the industrial structure’s sawtooth roof and structural frame acting as an armature for the open-air commercial spaces and mezzanine. That sawtooth form is repeated over one of the apartment buildings while the shed’s industrial materials are complemented by other hard surfaces nearby like the concrete piers of the SoHo Warehouse and what appears to be buff brick and corrugated metal cladding on two of the structures. A construction timeline for the project has not been released.
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Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill selected for high-tech overhaul in South Bend, Indiana

Union Station Technology Center (USTC) in South Bend, Indiana began its life as a train station. Now it's a data center and the state's second largest carrier hotel. As a piece of internet infrastructure, it's high tech. With the help of Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, the building owners are aiming for a design to suit. The building is in South Bend's Studebaker Corridor, so named for the wagon company turned automobile titan. Before it closed in 1963, Studebaker was the fourth largest automobile manufacturer in the nation, employing as many as 23,000 people in South Bend. Union Station Technology Center is among the tech-oriented rehabs that local businesspeople like Nick Easley, director of strategic initiatives for USTC, and developer Kevin Smith are using to rebrand the area as South Bend’s Renaissance District. AS+GG was selected as the emerging district's master planner in 2012. On Sunday it was announced that the Chicago-based firm—known for energy-efficient, eye-grabbing projects around the world—would lead the redesign of USTC, as well as “a mixed-use campus consisting of more than one million square feet of Class A office, education, technology, research grade manufacturing, data center, and live-work spaces.” A press release promises to turn USTC into “a large scale, sustainably designed tech hub that promises to spur a second economic boom for South Bend and the surrounding region.” South Bend's boosters hope the cold climate—which cuts server cooling costs—and local knowledge base at University of Notre Dame will help it stand out among cities from coast to coast currently chasing tech jobs to replace manufacturing work.