Posts tagged with "Lighting":

Rich Brilliant Willing: Patterns of Light Exhibition

Experience the Patterns of Light Exhibition for RBW's launch of their latest collection for a limited time during NYCxDesign Week. Their latest introduction of oversized textile pendants will push the boundaries of scale while creating a warm, luminous volume that provides a delicate heft and visual weight to a space.
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These digitally controlled lighting options connect to the entire building

Outfitted with control systems to connect to appliances, surveillance technologies, and other smart building tools, these digital controls provide more than just light.
Linear One LED and Canvas DMX Controller Acclaim Lighting Installable in recessed locations with no visible cords, Linear One LED fits seamlessly in the ceiling to create programmed lighting schemes. When paired with Canvas, a powerful DMX controller by Acclaim, users can design and modify lighting color schemes for temporary installations or permanent displays.
Litecontrol Vora 50L Hubbell This recessed troffer features a backlit LED. The light source is diffused by laser-etched acrylic guides that direct light uniformly across the surface of the fixture. It is available in five sizes with color tuning technology and a wired or wireless control platform powered by Hubbell’s lighting control app.
AI LED Downlight Juno Just ask Alexa! Juno integrates three technologies—a downlight, a speaker, and a built-in voice control system—into a single fixture. With Amazon’s integrated smart home platform, you can easily adjust thermostats, monitor security cameras, play music, get the weather, or dim the lighting.
Aether 2" Extreme Shallow LED Recessed Luminaire WAC Lighting With a diameter of just 2 inches, this incredibly compact fixture casts ample lighting from a tiny pinhole in the ceiling. Meanwhile, the wall washer actively controls glare and the universal driver allows you to dim the light down to just 5 percent. MultiPurpose Linear Columbia Lighting MultiPurpose Linear luminaires link together on one integrated control system to manage the lighting in a small string of rooms or an entire building. For applications ranging from commercial to institutional, it is available in 2 foot, 4 foot, or 8 foot lengths with multiple mounting options.
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Sandy Isenstadt takes readers on a tour of the dawn of electric lighting

Electric Light: An Architectural History Sandy Isenstadt MIT Press $44.95

At the turn of the 20th century, the life-world in Europe and America was deeply transformed by the simultaneous appearance of the telephone, subways, elevators, skyscrapers, cinema, automobiles, and the incandescent lamp. As outlined by Sanford Kwinter in his 1986 article, “La Città Nuova: Modernity and Continuity,” a new order emerged, whose main manifestations also fueled a new aesthetic realm—exemplified by the theoretical program of Italian Futurism.

Electric Light: An Architectural History, written by Sandy Isenstadt and published in 2018 by MIT Press, depicts the same cultural milieu as Kwinter did: It’s an attempt to relate the rise of a novel spatial sensibility with the proliferation of technical innovations. More specifically, Isenstadt, professor in the art history department at the University of Delaware, focuses his attention on electric light as epiphenomenon of a broad paradigm shift: modernity.

The advent of electric light, in fact, not only allowed people to extend conventional daytime activities to nighttime, but also alter the conception of a day-night divide Electric light introduced modern space through two fundamental concepts: instantaneity and action at a distance.

Despite similar premises and a shared chronological framework, Isenstadt’s work differs from Kwinter’s and many other contributions on the same theme in several significant aspects. First, Isenstadt doesn’t directly confront the avant-garde culture of the time. He doesn’t indulge in the typical topoi of movement and dynamism, nor does he introduce Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Umberto Boccioni, and Antonio Sant’Elia, all leading Futurist figures who envisioned a new material world made of speed, electricity, and intensity. On the contrary, Isenstadt is concerned with the impact of electricity on the everyday lives of millions of people. This is because, as he claims, electric light is itself a form of architecture. For this reason, Isenstadt also compiles an inventory of extraordinary objects enabled by electric light, such as cars, lamps, bulbs, animated advertisements, and lighted signs—all of which not only contained novel intrinsic properties, but also forged the emergence of a world that radically altered the perception of existing spaces and created new ones. By compiling these objects, Isenstadt traces a genealogy of modernity crystallized in the description of five different case studies all rooted in the American territory.

Whereas the first case study on the light switch depicts its technical and symbolic relevance—from its use in domestic spaces to the celebration of religious and political events—the second one looks into the experience of night driving; the car becomes a prosthesis of the human body, a projection of desires and curiosities, and the headlamps an instrument to explore unknown territories. The third case study analyses electric light in terms of efficiency and productivity in the workplace, including factories and schools, and the fourth is on Times Square in New York City: a landmark of modernity, a phantasmagoria of signs and billboards that constituted the first example of TEXT-scape, a homogenous field characterized by signs, signals, and advertisements. Lastly, Isenstadt explores the relationship between wartime and lighting during World War II by describing the application in America of collective and individual forms of blackout, which stemmed from paranoia about being bombed.

Regardless of its organization into five different parts, Electric Light: An Architectural History constitutes a narrative continuum on the idea of modernity. A further differentiation emerges. The case studies, in fact, suggest the simultaneous presence of two interpretative criteria. One is merely phenomenological: electric light has altered the perception of the space around us, our experiences, and our feelings. But at the same time, Isenstadt also points out how electricity has physically shaped a new world by inducing the rise of unprecedented spaces and typologies. This twofold perspective translates either into the intriguing description of certain perceptual conditions—such as the act of night driving or the urban reading of Times Square—or into the accurate classification of technical devices and methods of construction.

Whereas the whole narrative skeleton defined by Isenstadt makes his text undoubtedly fascinating, at first sight its subtitle—An Architectural History—can appear misleading. The book, in fact, is not a chronological excursus of architectural episodes, nor does it provide a methodological schema to understand what modernity in architecture is and what its features are. In varying the scope of his reflections—from the detail of the light switch to the suspended temporality of a city’s electrified streets—Isenstadt engages readers on a compelling journey at the intersection of society, culture, and technology. Rather than deploying aesthetic categories, Isenstadt focuses on new visual habits. Here again, the convergence between material, constructive depictions, and phenomenological aspects allows us to look at the five selected cases with a revived interest that reaches beyond sterile disciplinary categorizations.

The end result is a history of electric modernism: in the author’s words, “If modernity itself can be characterized by rapid, incessant change and modernism as the creative and conscious response to such change, then electric light—instantaneous, malleable, evanescent—is modernity’s medium.”

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Lighting design inspired by nature promotes well-being

Inspired by the cycles and systems of the natural world, these fixtures emulate sunlight to contribute to healthy building environments.
G2 Linear Accent Ketra Ketra’s lighting technology is delivered by a custom driver chip inside the lamp that enables it to produce consistent light that is measured and calibrated 360 times per second. The system follows natural light cycles based on geolocation to supply illumination that shifts throughout the day, emulating the color temperature and intensity of sunlight.
Good Day&Night Troffer Healthe by Lighting Science Lighting Science furnishes “human-centric” multispectrum circadian lightning to 2 foot by 2 foot and 2 foot by 4 foot troffers to allocate the right amount of illumination exactly when needed. The Good Day&Night technology fosters biological advantages prompted by natural cycles of sunlight—like productivity and focus—that stimulate a well-functioning circadian rhythm.
Downlight JA8 naturaLED Tired of drab lighting? This retrofit solution is ideal to replace 50 watt to 90 watt incandescent lamps. The recessed downlight fixtures utilize energy-efficient LED bulbs that meet Energy Star standards.
Duo Ceiling Lamp Vibia
Barcelona-based industrial designers David Ramos and Jordi Bassols conjure a sunny glow, articulated by the sculptural curvature of Duo. The flush-mounted ceiling fixture is enveloped in a matte lacquered outer shell, while the interior is swathed in warm oak veneer—a perfect combination of warm and cool materials suitable for residential and commercial spaces.
ZERO BLUE Soraa Healthy
On earth, the naturally occurring circadian light cycle produces the highest levels of blue light in the morning, and, as the day progresses, less and less—effectively sending your body the message that it is time to sleep. The aptly dubbed ZERO BLUE LED bulb emits none of the aforementioned hue to promote better sleep. Designed with a pairing of green and red phosphors, the LEDs produce a white light.
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OFFICE and Pieter Vermeersch debut spheroidic furniture collection inspired by Solo House II

Belgian artist Pieter Vermeersch and architecture studio OFFICE Kersten Geers David Severen have partnered on numerous projects. Most notably, the celebrated installation artist carried out a series of gradient wall paintings on the roof of the experimental firm’s 2017 project, Solo House II. Culminating this particular collaboration is a new capsule furniture assemblage debuting at Brussels’s Maniera Gallery, now on view through May 4. Comprised of a kinetic room divider, a graphical table, a cylindrical floor lamp, and a metal-mesh sofa, the new collectible design collection draws direct inspiration from the architecture of the iconic project. Perched on an isolated plateau in Spain’s Matarraña forest, the 360-degree, circular Solo House II follows modernists principles, such as the blending of indoor and outdoor space. Between two monolithic slab profiles that function as a base and roof, thin columns and glass walls delineate porous interiors. Geometric volumes are strategically placed on both levels to hide utilities. The new furniture collection echoes the building’s spheroid aesthetic. The semi-circular and semi-transparent Perimeter Room Divider is made up of polystyrol mirror slates, clad in a beige-pink gradient. Loosely anchored on an aluminum rail, the screen can transform from a gradient spectrum into a reflective surface. This same iridescent quality is evident in the totemic Light Post floor lamp. While circles and squares form the structure of the Solo and Round tables, Vermeersch’s painterly interventions are evident in the patina of the pieces’ Bianco Neve marble tops. The organically-shaped Divan 2p sofa and Fauteuil 1.5P lounge chair evoke the rugged nature of Solo House II's arid surroundings. Within the gallery space, the combined set-design of these similar yet distinct pieces strike an impressive pose. Like the house it references, the collection's bright color tones soften its minimalistic presence. At its core, the assemblage and exhibition reveal how art, architecture, and design can transcend and hold equal footing. Beyond traditional definitions, the exploration of archetypical shape is what matter most for both Vermeersch and OFFICE. This interdisciplinary methodology is apparent in their respective practices. Whereas the former addresses space in his art, the later often approaches architecture with an object-centric point of view. For OFFICE, furniture operates on an intermediate scale, between architecture and the human being; the body and city. The showcase also features work by major Dutch architectural photography Bas Princen, OFFICE’s longtime collaborator. The 2012 Mosques in the Nile Valley series captures the interplay of fluorescent lights on monolithic buildings at night. The photos resemble Suprematist compositions—an aesthetic also evoked in the furniture collection.
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Lambert & Fils launches its new Corridor gallery space in Montreal

Young Montreal lighting brand Lambert & Fils has gained recognition in the past few years with a series of blockbuster lighting collections that have broken away from the norms that have stagnated the lighting industry in the past few years. Notable designs include the airport-inspired Dorval series, developed with French studio SCMP. The boutique design house has also developed a series of lauded private and retail interiors. Building on this success, Lambert & Fils has just opened a new exhibition annex adjacent to its office and workshop. Located in the heart of Montreal, Corridor promises to become a new space for cultural exchange. The gallery will feature art and design, and will explore where these often-siloed disciplines intersect. To launch the new space, Lambert & Fils tapped Swiss designer Adrien Rovero to create a special, temporary installation. The Feu de Camp mise-en-scene draws inspiration from Rovero's short time in the boy scouts but also from Montreal’s long and cold winters. The installation incorporates various geometric forms, flashlight-inspired fixtures, and simple industrial materials—green tubes, elastics, electrical wires, and semi-spherical glass diffusers—loosely in the form of a campfire as a way to bring people together during the dreary late-winter season. The installation is arranged around a central node with 12 low-lying lamps surrounding in a circle. These elements were used sparingly to compose a playful yet technically-refined setup, and Rovero also created a wall mural that illustrates this peculiar typology in his unique assemblage-inspired aesthetic. Though this inaugural installation closes tomorrow, Corridor will open the new Studio Edition exhibition—a group show featuring work by emerging Canadian designers—in the coming months.
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Italian architect Ferruccio Laviani imbues iconic Foscarini lamps with color

Released in the United States for the first time this month, the Be Colour capsule collection reworks designs from Italian lighting brand Foscarini’s catalog of decorative luminaires. The Venice-based company asked its longtime collaborator Ferruccio Laviani to reimagine some the company's most iconic pieces. The architect chose a bold color palette to enliven classics like the compact Binic table fixture, the adaptable Magneto desk lamp, the Gregg and Bahia wall sconces, and the Twiggy floor lamp—a version of which received a 2018 AN Best of Products Awards honorable mention. “We wanted to go beyond the all over effect of a single color,” Laviani explained. “Where possible, we formulated chromatic combinations that make the shape of each lamp more unexpected.” The architect separated what were originally monochromatic totems into different geometric forms using strategic color pairing. In some cases, like the Magneto desk lamp, such an intervention helps delineate function. The fixture’s fiery-red stem deliberately contrasts with its baby-blue head to show how the lamp can be adjusted. Laviani’s interest in color is nothing new. In 1991, he developed the Orbital standing lamp for Foscarini, which was a study in the relationship between form and tone. The release of the Be Colour capsule collection coincides with the opening of the Foscarini’s new Spazio Soho showroom. The recently-renovated Greene Street space in New York is now the Italian company's American flagship store.
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Two shows explore Isamu Noguchi’s legacy of experimentation with craft

Two shows at the Noguchi Museum in New York City explore the legacy of Isamu Noguchi's Akari "light sculptures" by highlighting classics from the artist and designer's oeuvre alongside more recent work by the French design studio YMER&MALTA. The shows, which were originally scheduled to close in January, have been given an extended run and will be open through May 5, 2019. Fans of Noguchi's work will recognize his signature lamps made of bamboo, wood, and paper that expand on traditional Japanese craftwork. The show focusing on his work, Akari: Sculpture by Other Means, aims to give visitors new perspectives by installing Noguchi's creations in the kind of immersive environments that have been especially popular recently both for their experiential quality and Instagrammable potential. Akari Unfolded: A Collection by YMER&MALTA displays 26 lamps that riff on Akari and Noguchi's work, bringing his spirit of exploration in traditional craft and materials into the 21st century.
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Lutron opens New York lighting center and showroom

The Pennsylvania-based Lutron Electronics has opened a new showroom in the D&D Building on Third Avenue in Midtown Manhattan. The lighting and shading company, long known for their commitment to good design and the latest technology, now has a space where designers can experience the company’s products. It is possible to test their entire line, including the technologically advanced Ketra line and what they call “human-centric lighting.” Architects will also appreciate the Ivalo line of fixtures that are perhaps the best designed of any American product on the market. The space is located on the third floor of the D&D building at 979 Third Avenue, is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and welcomes walk-in clients.
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Bar Basso, the historic heart of Milanese design, gets new birthday lights

On the occasion of Bar Basso’s 51st birthday this October, the designers of Gabriel Scott presented a new lighting installation, the first addition to the famous Milanese watering hole’s interior since 1967. AN Interior contributor Jordan Hruska sat down with the bar's owner, Maurizio Stocchetto. AN Interior: How has the design of Bar Basso changed over the last 51 years? Maurizio Stocchetto: Bar Basso was founded in 1947, but my father, Mirko Stocchetto, took it over in 1967. He kept most of the furniture of the previous owner, including wood paneling, mirrors, chairs, and the iconic neon sign outside. AN: Explain the history of how your father created the infamous Negroni Sbagliato and his overall vision for the bar. MS: In the 1960s, cocktails in Milan were hard to come by. Oddly enough, they were popular in Venice, Cortina, and Florence—mostly in the lounges of the big hotels. My father brought an old-school experience he gained by working at hotel bars to a small street corner in Milan. One day, while making a Negroni, a cocktail traditionally made with Campari, red vermouth, and gin, he substituted sparkling wine for gin, claiming that he picked that bottle by mistake. He finished the drink anyway. I‘ve never known if it was true, but the name Sbagliato, which means “mistaken,” caught on. AN: Why do you think designers were initially attracted to Bar Basso as a place to gather in the 1980s? MS: Bar Basso attracted many creative people starting as far back as the 1960s. I think it’s because of its unpretentious atmosphere. Joe Colombo and many architects from Politecnico, the Milanese University of Architecture, were already regulars in the ’70s, but I was too young to notice them. The first designers that I personally met were James Irvine, Jasper Morrison, Marc Newson, Stefano Giovannoni, and a few others working in the [Ettore] Sottsass studio. This community started to grow spontaneously more or less at the same time as the Salone del Mobile brought more visitors to town. After our first “British Invasion,” we started to attract Scandinavian designers, design journalists, and assorted manufacturers. AN: How has your knowledge of design changed since Bar Basso has become an informal hub for designers? MS: The sheer proximity with designers has given me an awareness of how much effort lies behind any design piece, even for objects that we always take for granted. AN: Thousands of designers around the world have a very intimate connection to Bar Basso. Why did you choose Gabriel Scott to design your new lighting? MS: Gabriel Kakon and Scott Richler, owners of Gabriel Scott, contacted me last March in order to organize an exposition of their lamps during the Salone del Mobile in two of our windows. We hit it off and agreed to develop the bar’s first-ever installation to celebrate our anniversary. AN: How did they develop the lighting installation? MS: Gabriel and Scott proposed installing versions of their Myriad and Welles light fixtures with custom satin copper fixture finishes, which give off an alabaster glow that evokes the color of the Negroni Sbagliato. AN: What are the plans for Bar Basso in the next 51 years? MS: Stay alive and stay in business!
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Shedding light: These 9 outdoor fixtures illuminate the way

Take in some of the outdoor lighting fixtures released this year at the NAHB International Builders’ Show, Chicago’s Lightfair International, and at the AIA National Convention Expo. Outfitted with new technologies and design features, the following fixtures balance both safety and ambiance in their designs.
Homann Park Louis Poulsen Glow rings on the top and bottom of this street lamp cast dynamic upward and downward illumination. The fixture is equipped with wireless connectivity that allows control of the light settings and provides WiFi for the surrounding area.
Prisma Sonneman
These sconces filter light through geometric angled cuts. The fixtures are available in tall and narrow or short and wide profiles in three finishes: white, gray, and bronze.
Ouro Exterior Luminaire Kim/Hubbell Lighting
This fixture creates scalable lighting that can be mounted in two configurations. This allows it to illuminate low-lying areas like walkways, or conversely, to light parkways and roads from higher vantage points.
Portal Illuminating Column HessAmerica Enveloped in an aluminum shell that shows no visible welds, this LED light diffuses from a “portal” opening. Lighting is evenly distributed upward and downward through lenses covering the apertures. The unit is offered in textured dark gray, graphite gray, or matte silver gray metallic finishes. O Artemide Rendered in the shape of the letter O, this fixture was designed to respond to the surrounding landscape and reduce its ecological footprint in public spaces. Available as both suspension and ground luminaires, the ring is illuminated only when triggered by sensors or preset to turn on.
Exelia LED SELUX Providing ambiance and safety, Exelia LED is designed to illuminate pedestrian walkways and other low-lying areas with four light distribution patterns. The die-cast and extruded aluminum column is coated in a Tiger Drylac–certified polyester powder-coat finish, making it resistant to impact and year-round weather patterns.
Blade Les Jardins Solar Lighting Portable and rechargeable, this teak lamp can refill outside in four-to-eight hours of sunlight, or indoors in four hours via a USB connection. It is adjustable in a range of 100 to 400 lumens for custom lighting schemes.
Scoop Bollard WAC Lighting
Illuminate public spaces and commercial areas with this charming bollard that provides up to 60,000 hours of safety lighting. It is offered with either warm or cool white LEDs with a black or bronze finish.
Glowline-Inground The Light Lab This ground luminaire offers the promise of unlimited lighting. Assembled using end-to-end positioning, this fixture’s low-profile linear acrylic LEDs can be installed recessed or flush in endless configurations: lining pathways, snaking up stairways, or articulating the curves of a sinuous facade.
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Salesforce Tower’s massive light show to permanently illuminate San Francisco’s skyline

Salesforce Tower’s nine-story steel topper is set to light up San Francisco permanently starting tomorrow night, as video artist Jim Campbell’s enormous animations will start broadcasting from the top. The tower’s 130-foot-tall, Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects-designed crown is hollow and has been clad in perforated aluminum panels–ostensibly to lessen the bullet-shaped building’s impact on the skyline. Using imagery from cameras scattered around the city (and 11,000 LEDs inside of the crown), Campbell will translate traffic, the sky, and each night’s sunsets into a public art piece visible for 20 miles in every direction. The fleeting, ephemeral images are an ode to the city’s vibrancy and energy. During a test run last Wednesday, giant ballerinas could be seen dancing across a beige background over 1,000 feet in the air. The tower’s signature piece, Day for Night, will start by showing the colors of that night’s sunset, followed by constellations against the night sky until the sun rises again. While the top nine floors of the Salesforce Tower are unoccupied and were used to push the building into “tallest in San Francisco” territory, only the upper six floors will be used to stage Campbell’s installation. The remaining three will hold the required equipment and will be bathed in a strong light to form a base for the animation above. While the punctured panels could theoretically show any images, Campbell swears that his work won’t be used for advertisements or to mark holidays. As for the electricity use? It’s the same as “five toaster ovens,” Campbell told the San Francisco Chronicle. The developers, designers, and engineers behind Salesforce Tower will be presenting on their work at the next Facades+ conference in San Francisco, taking place on June 7.