Posts tagged with "Lighting":

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Two shows explore Isamu Noguchi’s legacy of experimentation with craft

Two shows at the Noguchi Museum in New York City explore the legacy of Isamu Noguchi's Akari "light sculptures" by highlighting classics from the artist and designer's oeuvre alongside more recent work by the French design studio YMER&MALTA. The shows, which were originally scheduled to close in January, have been given an extended run and will be open through May 5, 2019. Fans of Noguchi's work will recognize his signature lamps made of bamboo, wood, and paper that expand on traditional Japanese craftwork. The show focusing on his work, Akari: Sculpture by Other Means, aims to give visitors new perspectives by installing Noguchi's creations in the kind of immersive environments that have been especially popular recently both for their experiential quality and Instagrammable potential. Akari Unfolded: A Collection by YMER&MALTA displays 26 lamps that riff on Akari and Noguchi's work, bringing his spirit of exploration in traditional craft and materials into the 21st century.
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Lutron opens New York lighting center and showroom

The Pennsylvania-based Lutron Electronics has opened a new showroom in the D&D Building on Third Avenue in Midtown Manhattan. The lighting and shading company, long known for their commitment to good design and the latest technology, now has a space where designers can experience the company’s products. It is possible to test their entire line, including the technologically advanced Ketra line and what they call “human-centric lighting.” Architects will also appreciate the Ivalo line of fixtures that are perhaps the best designed of any American product on the market. The space is located on the third floor of the D&D building at 979 Third Avenue, is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and welcomes walk-in clients.
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Bar Basso, the historic heart of Milanese design, gets new birthday lights

On the occasion of Bar Basso’s 51st birthday this October, the designers of Gabriel Scott presented a new lighting installation, the first addition to the famous Milanese watering hole’s interior since 1967. AN Interior contributor Jordan Hruska sat down with the bar's owner, Maurizio Stocchetto. AN Interior: How has the design of Bar Basso changed over the last 51 years? Maurizio Stocchetto: Bar Basso was founded in 1947, but my father, Mirko Stocchetto, took it over in 1967. He kept most of the furniture of the previous owner, including wood paneling, mirrors, chairs, and the iconic neon sign outside. AN: Explain the history of how your father created the infamous Negroni Sbagliato and his overall vision for the bar. MS: In the 1960s, cocktails in Milan were hard to come by. Oddly enough, they were popular in Venice, Cortina, and Florence—mostly in the lounges of the big hotels. My father brought an old-school experience he gained by working at hotel bars to a small street corner in Milan. One day, while making a Negroni, a cocktail traditionally made with Campari, red vermouth, and gin, he substituted sparkling wine for gin, claiming that he picked that bottle by mistake. He finished the drink anyway. I‘ve never known if it was true, but the name Sbagliato, which means “mistaken,” caught on. AN: Why do you think designers were initially attracted to Bar Basso as a place to gather in the 1980s? MS: Bar Basso attracted many creative people starting as far back as the 1960s. I think it’s because of its unpretentious atmosphere. Joe Colombo and many architects from Politecnico, the Milanese University of Architecture, were already regulars in the ’70s, but I was too young to notice them. The first designers that I personally met were James Irvine, Jasper Morrison, Marc Newson, Stefano Giovannoni, and a few others working in the [Ettore] Sottsass studio. This community started to grow spontaneously more or less at the same time as the Salone del Mobile brought more visitors to town. After our first “British Invasion,” we started to attract Scandinavian designers, design journalists, and assorted manufacturers. AN: How has your knowledge of design changed since Bar Basso has become an informal hub for designers? MS: The sheer proximity with designers has given me an awareness of how much effort lies behind any design piece, even for objects that we always take for granted. AN: Thousands of designers around the world have a very intimate connection to Bar Basso. Why did you choose Gabriel Scott to design your new lighting? MS: Gabriel Kakon and Scott Richler, owners of Gabriel Scott, contacted me last March in order to organize an exposition of their lamps during the Salone del Mobile in two of our windows. We hit it off and agreed to develop the bar’s first-ever installation to celebrate our anniversary. AN: How did they develop the lighting installation? MS: Gabriel and Scott proposed installing versions of their Myriad and Welles light fixtures with custom satin copper fixture finishes, which give off an alabaster glow that evokes the color of the Negroni Sbagliato. AN: What are the plans for Bar Basso in the next 51 years? MS: Stay alive and stay in business!
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Shedding light: These 9 outdoor fixtures illuminate the way

Take in some of the outdoor lighting fixtures released this year at the NAHB International Builders’ Show, Chicago’s Lightfair International, and at the AIA National Convention Expo. Outfitted with new technologies and design features, the following fixtures balance both safety and ambiance in their designs.
Homann Park Louis Poulsen Glow rings on the top and bottom of this street lamp cast dynamic upward and downward illumination. The fixture is equipped with wireless connectivity that allows control of the light settings and provides WiFi for the surrounding area.
Prisma Sonneman
These sconces filter light through geometric angled cuts. The fixtures are available in tall and narrow or short and wide profiles in three finishes: white, gray, and bronze.
Ouro Exterior Luminaire Kim/Hubbell Lighting
This fixture creates scalable lighting that can be mounted in two configurations. This allows it to illuminate low-lying areas like walkways, or conversely, to light parkways and roads from higher vantage points.
Portal Illuminating Column HessAmerica Enveloped in an aluminum shell that shows no visible welds, this LED light diffuses from a “portal” opening. Lighting is evenly distributed upward and downward through lenses covering the apertures. The unit is offered in textured dark gray, graphite gray, or matte silver gray metallic finishes. O Artemide Rendered in the shape of the letter O, this fixture was designed to respond to the surrounding landscape and reduce its ecological footprint in public spaces. Available as both suspension and ground luminaires, the ring is illuminated only when triggered by sensors or preset to turn on.
Exelia LED SELUX Providing ambiance and safety, Exelia LED is designed to illuminate pedestrian walkways and other low-lying areas with four light distribution patterns. The die-cast and extruded aluminum column is coated in a Tiger Drylac–certified polyester powder-coat finish, making it resistant to impact and year-round weather patterns.
Blade Les Jardins Solar Lighting Portable and rechargeable, this teak lamp can refill outside in four-to-eight hours of sunlight, or indoors in four hours via a USB connection. It is adjustable in a range of 100 to 400 lumens for custom lighting schemes.
Scoop Bollard WAC Lighting
Illuminate public spaces and commercial areas with this charming bollard that provides up to 60,000 hours of safety lighting. It is offered with either warm or cool white LEDs with a black or bronze finish.
Glowline-Inground The Light Lab This ground luminaire offers the promise of unlimited lighting. Assembled using end-to-end positioning, this fixture’s low-profile linear acrylic LEDs can be installed recessed or flush in endless configurations: lining pathways, snaking up stairways, or articulating the curves of a sinuous facade.
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Six dazzling decorative lighting fixtures

Below, you'll find six fixtures that add atmospheric lighting and character to any space. These illuminating releases recently debuted at the Interior Design Show in Toronto, MAISON&OBJET in Paris, the Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair, and Light + Building in Frankfurt.

Tripp-Mini Pendant Pelle

This small-scale iteration of the popular 2014 triangular fixture makes it usable in new compositions and spaces; its welded metal forms illuminate a triangular outline where the joinery is left exposed.

Kuu Elina Ulvio

Kuu, the pendant named after the Finnish for moon, was designed for both direct and indirect light via its rotating inner circle. Made of plywood and acrylic, the obsidian light source is fitted with a wireless connection, allowing it to endlessly revolve within its oval enclosure.

Grid Pablo Designs

Imagined as a 3-D plane on a grid, this louvered framework emits glare-free lighting through translucent slats. The fixtures come as 18.5-by-18.5-inch squares or 18.5-by-46.3-inch rectangles and can be finished in ash wood as well as frosted and bronze acrylic.

Amisol Daniel Rybakken for Luceplan

Like the reflectors used in a photography studio, this fixture projects a powerful source of light onto a large disk that diffuses and reflects light beams. With an unfixed base, the light-capturing membrane is easily adjusted; it is available in translucent white film or with an amber metallic finish.

Blush Morten & Jonas for Northern

Norwegian design duo Morten & Jonas envisioned a pretty wall lamp shaped with subtle contours that guide ergonomic indicators, including a soft, bendable arm and rimmed rotating switch. The lamp is available in black and pink.

Mondo Floor Lamp Antonio Facco for Oblure

Made from 3-D laser-cut steel, this opal glass orb is enveloped in graphic black lines. The kinetic, sculptural metal shades rotate and overlap each other to form various patterns.

[SPONSORED] Maglin Add color to your Spring collection. Energize your indoor or outdoor space with a splash of color
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Specsheet > Ephemeral Outdoor Lighting

Outdoor lighting not only provides safety—it also changes the overall look of a space. These open-air fixtures create an atmospheric mise-en-scène. Solar Foscarini Designed by Jean-Marie Massaud for Foscarini, this outdoor light (pictured above) also acts as a surface to place drinks on or gather around. Made with a unique blend of durable polyethylene and porcelain stoneware, the base is fully illuminated, while the stoneware top shields light from below. Halley Vibia A radiating arch of light is illuminated by a slim array of LEDs nested in a frosted lens. The resulting effect is an elegantly diffused, chiaroscuro treatment of light and shadow. Halley is made in three variations: floor-to-floor, floor-to-wall, and floor-to-clamp. Bollards Sonneman Working as an interconnected system of lighting along paths or planted beds, these bollards create a balance of solid geometry and LED illumination. Rectilinear columns form single-sided and double-sided LED-illuminated fixtures that come with myriad options for lenses, caps, and heights. Poppy Northern Lighting Inspired by a field of tall poppies, these outdoor oil lamps by Northern Lighting were crafted in a shape that captures the flowers’ elegant stems and crowns. Poppy is available as a table lamp, a floor lamp, and a lawn light that attaches to the ground with a pin. Made in powder-coated steel, the series is a part of the Unplugged outdoor lighting collection. Oblique Artemide This outdoor collection is inspired by a plant: Like a growing bean sprout, the oblique light head rest on a vertical stem stretching out of the ground. Artemide offers floor- and wall-mounted versions. Ballad Lamp and Stand Fermob Designed by Tristan Lohner, this portable lantern comes in seven bold colors and can be mounted on a stand to become an outdoor floor lamp. With rechargeable LED technology, the light is solar powered.
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Meet the honorable mentions in our 2017 Best of Product Awards!

Last week we shared the winning designs from our largest-ever Products Awards across 15 sundry categories, including technology, textiles, HVAC, furniture, facades, and more. Scroll through the slideshow to see the the honorable mentions from each category, evaluated by our team of judges for innovation, aesthetics, performance, and value. You can find our winners and honorable mentions featured in our September issue—out September 6! The Best of Products Awards Jury: James Biber Partner, Biber Architects Olivia Martin Managing Editor, The Architect’s Newspaper William Menking Editor in Chief, The Architect’s Newspaper Patrick Parrish Owner, Patrick Parrish Gallery Tucker Viemeister Founder, Viemeister Industries Pilar Viladas Design writer and editor HONORABLE MENTIONS To view images of all honorable mentions, please click through the slideshow above. Finishes & Surfaces CONDUCT by Flavor Paper PUZZLE by Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby for Mutina for Stone Source Bath LINEA SHOWER BASE by Fiora VERGE WITH WASHBAR by Bradley Corp. Lighting SYMMETRY by Visa Lighting LIFT WITH BIOS by Pinnacle Architectural Lighting Textiles SIGNATURE & LEGACY COLLECTIONS by KnollTextiles SHADE by Chilewich Openings GPX FIREFLOOR SYSTEM by Safti First CURVED by Vitrocsa Technology & Innovation MATTERPORT PRO2 3D CAMERA by Matterport PORTABLE ULTRA SHORT THROW PROJECTOR by Sony Kitchen 4-DOOR FLEX REFRIGERATOR by Samsung VERTICAL BAR BLOCK by Henrybuilt Interior Commercial Furniture GLASSCUBE by CARVART KANSO BENCH by HBF Interior Residential Furniture STEMN SERIES by Fyrn DICHROIC TABLE by Rottet Collection Structural FIRE AND WATER BARRIER TAPE by 3M SCHLUTER-DITRA-HEAT-DUO by Schluter Systems Smart Home Systems EVOLVED MINNEAPOLIS FULL ESCUTCHEON HANDLESET by Baldwin Hardware PANOVISTA MAX by Renson Facades PHOTOVOLTAIC FACADE by Onyx Solar TRIANGULAR RAINSCREEN PANEL by Shildan HVAC EME3625DFL LOUVER by Ruskin AIRFLOW PANEL by Architectural Applications Outdoor Public GO OUTDOORTABLE by Landscape Forms ULURU by Metalco srl/id metalco, Inc. Outdoor Residential CLOUD BENCH by Bend Goods VERTICAL LOUNGER by DEESAWAT  
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Olafur Eliasson invites refugees and asylum seekers to craft lighting designs at The Moody Center for the Arts

The Moody Center for the Arts at Rice University opened in Houston to much fanfare with exhibitions by practitioners including Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson and Japanese collective teamLab to kick off its first season. Green light – An artistic workshop is the brainchild of Eliasson in collaboration with the Thyssen Bornemisza Art Contemporary (TBA21) of Vienna. In its first trip to the U.S., the workshop aims to give refugees and asylum seekers a “green light” to participate in a variety of programs to elicit creativity and community. The workshop invites participants to construct modular green lamps designed by Eliasson out of recycled materials, which can stand alone as singular units or be stacked into more complex constructions. The hope for the work is to create an environment where communities can collide and create together in a playful and collaborative environment. “Green light is an act of welcoming, addressed both to those who have fled hardship and instability in their home countries and to the residents of the cities receiving them,” said Eliasson in a statement. “I hope Green light shines light on some of the challenges and responsibilities arising from the current refugee crisis in Europe and throughout the world.”

Green light – An artistic workshop The Moody Center for the Arts at Rice University 6100 Main Street, Houston Through May 6, 2017

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BIG unveils “Alphabet of Light” installation with Artemide at Salone del Mobile

In tandem with this year’s Salone del Mobile Euroluce event, Artemide partnered with Bjarke Ingels Group to create a new light series, Alphabet of Light. Inspired by neon lights, BIG worked with Artemide to create an updated, LED light that could be formed into letters or graphics—creating a new font in the process. Alphabet of Light is composed of straight and curved light modules with high-tech optoelectronics to ensure a smooth, even light.

To showcase this new product, BIG and Artemide installed the modular system in the east courtyard of the Università degli Studi di Milano using the classic typography sentence, “Quick Brown Fox Jumps Over the Lazy Dog,” which uses every letter in the alphabet. The installation is part of the event Interni Material Immaterial.

For more Salone del Mobile and Milan Design Week coverage don’t miss The Architect’s Newspaper’s Instagram with our live updates.

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Pendants to light up the holiday season!

A selection of standout lighting pieces to give a rosy glow to any space and add striking visual interest. Aplomb Foscarini Aplomb is made of hand-pressed concrete, in a delicate balance of thickness to achieve a sophisticated shape with enough texture. The lamp is available in three shape and color options. Lys Oluce Designed by Daniele Ruzza and Silvana Angeletti, this pendant contains soft LED lighting with a methacrylate disc that provides a halo of light to be cast downward. Teardrop Pendant Tracy Glover Studio These gorgeous bubble-like lamps can be hung individually or in a cluster, with either a transparent or matte glass overlay in a variety of colors to suit any space. Mono Lamp Nude A super-minimal lamp made with blown unworked glass. Available in smoke glass with a copper socket, or clear glass with a perfectly contrasted concrete socket. Casper Pendant LightArt Available in four separate sizes, Casper can be arranged in a multitude of configurations, allowing for an intense chandelier of light, or more subtle singular applications. Nama 4 Pendant Global Lighting Inspired by the 1960’s counterculture, this woven rattan pendant casts glorious shadows around the room in an unexpected black that is a sleek alternative to natural rattan.
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2016 Best of Design Award for Lighting > Indoor: Planned Parenthood Queens by Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it's grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you.

2016 Best of Design Award for Lighting > Indoor: Planned Parenthood Queens—Diane L. Max Health Center

Lighting Design: Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design Location: Queens, NY

Planned Parenthood’s new clinic in Queens transforms a former storage warehouse into a welcoming ambulatory healthcare center. Using the building’s generous new windows as inspiration, LED light coves in bold colors punctuate a sleek, white interior. These colorful elements work with signage and furnishings to support wayfinding and spatial organization and the overall design embodies a modern, forward-thinking spirit, representative of the center’s youthful clientele. A thoughtful combination of LED and fluorescent sources achieves a 5 percent energy savings beyond the stringent standards and also meets the project’s modest budget. Light, color, and architecture are woven together to create a friendly, upbeat health center that will serve as a guide for future Planned Parenthood facilities.

Architect Stephen Yablon Architecture

Signage & Environmental Graphics Calori & Vanden-Eynden Dimming Ballasts Lutron Fixed-Color LED Cove Lights iLight Technologies Adjustable Downlights Lucifer Lighting

Honorable Mention, Lighting > Indoor: Lincoln Square Synagogue

Lighting Design: Tillotson Design Associates Location: New York, NY

Small recessed LED downlights in the synagogue’s ceiling create the effect of a starry night, while LED coves with resin diffusers spill soft light onto the acoustical walls, accentuating its form and completing the imagery of a nomadic tented structure under a desert sky.

Honorable Mention, Lighting > Indoor: The Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Assumption 

Architect: MBH Architects Location: San Francisco, CA

In order to maintain the character of this important cathedral while modernizing its lighting, long-life solutions like LED and fluorescent fixtures as well as DMX lighting were seamlessly integrated. The system creates studio-quality imagery for television recordings while maintaining a warm glow.

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Six teams of top global architecture firms battle to light up London’s bridges

Six finalists from the U.K., U.S., and France are competing for a $24.8 million commission which will see their designs be used to illuminate all 17 bridges that span the River Thames in central London. Battling for the dazzling commission is David Adjaye, Amanda Levete Architects (AL_A), Sam Jacob Studio, and Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands from London, along with New York firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Lyon-based practice Les Éclairagistes Associés. Initially, 105 teams had entered the Illuminated River competition run by Malcolm Reading Consultants. The winners will see their lighting proposals realized as a permanent installation that aims to "breath new life" into the Thames. Chair of the Illuminated River Foundation, Hannah Rothschild said on the competition's website:
Since the founding of London, the mighty Thames has been the city’s main artery, linking north and south, east and west, encouraging business, activity and recreation. But at night, the river becomes a ribbon of darkness, a place that few enjoy and at odds with the ambition to make London a 24 hour city. This project will bring light, energy, beauty and recreation to the river and at the flick of a switch, transform the city at night.
Despite waxing lyrical, Rothschild's words did not impress critic Oliver Wainwright of The Guardian. "[It’s] simply not true. The river already shines with a series of conflicting color schemes that speaks more of London’s chaotic character than a curated nightly show," he said. Wainwright also poured scorn on Adjaye's proposal, remarking that the 17 pavilions the architect proposes alongside each of the bridges adds "more clutter to the streetscape." The project will be privately funded. So far, though, $11.8 million is still required. It's also worth pointing out that the infamously costly (and not yet built) Garden Bridge by Thomas Heatherwick started life in a similar vein. The shortlisted six's videos can be found below meanwhile images are in the gallery above. Blurring Boundaries Adjaye Associates with Cai Guo-Qiang, Chris Ofili, Larry Bell, Jeremy Deller, Philippe Parreno, Richard Woods, Mariko Mori, Lorna Simpson, Teresita Fernández, Joana Vasconcelos, Angela Bulloch, Thukral & Tagra, Katharina Grosse, Glenn Ligon, Doug Aitken, Tomás Saraceno, onedotzero digital consultants, Plan A Consultants, DHA, Hurley Palmer Flatt, AKT II, AECOM, Arup, Sir Robert McAlpine, Tavernor Consultancy, DP9, Four Communications, Hayes Davidson digital visualizers, Bosch, and iGuzzini.
The Eternal Story of the River Thames AL_A, Asif Kapadia, Simon Stephens, SEAM Design, Arup, GROSS. MAX., Mark Filip, Soundings, and DP9.
Synchronizing the City: Its Natural and Urban Rhythms Diller Scofidio + Renfro with Oliver Beer, Arup, Copper Consultancy, L’Observatoire International, Penoyre & Prasad, Jennifer Tipton, and Transsolar.
Thames Nocturne Sam Jacob Studio and Simon Heijdens with Studio Dekka, Daisy Froud, Elliott Wood, Jackson Coles, and Professor John Tyrer.
A River Ain’t Too Much To Light Les Éclairagistes Associés (L.E.A.), ecqi ltd. and Federico Pietrella in association with GVA Lighting Europe Limited and ewo srl.
Current Leo Villareal with Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands and Future\Pace. Atelier Ten, Beckett Rankine, Bradley Hemmings, Core Five, Futurecity, Greenwich +Docklands International Festival, MBNA Thames Clippers, Montagu Evans, Pentagram, and Price & Myers.
Winners are due to be announced in early December with work on the 17 bridges being completed in phases between 2018 and 2020.