Posts tagged with "Lighting Design":

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OFFICE and Pieter Vermeersch debut spheroidic furniture collection inspired by Solo House II

Belgian artist Pieter Vermeersch and architecture studio OFFICE Kersten Geers David Severen have partnered on numerous projects. Most notably, the celebrated installation artist carried out a series of gradient wall paintings on the roof of the experimental firm’s 2017 project, Solo House II. Culminating this particular collaboration is a new capsule furniture assemblage debuting at Brussels’s Maniera Gallery, now on view through May 4. Comprised of a kinetic room divider, a graphical table, a cylindrical floor lamp, and a metal-mesh sofa, the new collectible design collection draws direct inspiration from the architecture of the iconic project. Perched on an isolated plateau in Spain’s Matarraña forest, the 360-degree, circular Solo House II follows modernists principles, such as the blending of indoor and outdoor space. Between two monolithic slab profiles that function as a base and roof, thin columns and glass walls delineate porous interiors. Geometric volumes are strategically placed on both levels to hide utilities. The new furniture collection echoes the building’s spheroid aesthetic. The semi-circular and semi-transparent Perimeter Room Divider is made up of polystyrol mirror slates, clad in a beige-pink gradient. Loosely anchored on an aluminum rail, the screen can transform from a gradient spectrum into a reflective surface. This same iridescent quality is evident in the totemic Light Post floor lamp. While circles and squares form the structure of the Solo and Round tables, Vermeersch’s painterly interventions are evident in the patina of the pieces’ Bianco Neve marble tops. The organically-shaped Divan 2p sofa and Fauteuil 1.5P lounge chair evoke the rugged nature of Solo House II's arid surroundings. Within the gallery space, the combined set-design of these similar yet distinct pieces strike an impressive pose. Like the house it references, the collection's bright color tones soften its minimalistic presence. At its core, the assemblage and exhibition reveal how art, architecture, and design can transcend and hold equal footing. Beyond traditional definitions, the exploration of archetypical shape is what matter most for both Vermeersch and OFFICE. This interdisciplinary methodology is apparent in their respective practices. Whereas the former addresses space in his art, the later often approaches architecture with an object-centric point of view. For OFFICE, furniture operates on an intermediate scale, between architecture and the human being; the body and city. The showcase also features work by major Dutch architectural photography Bas Princen, OFFICE’s longtime collaborator. The 2012 Mosques in the Nile Valley series captures the interplay of fluorescent lights on monolithic buildings at night. The photos resemble Suprematist compositions—an aesthetic also evoked in the furniture collection.
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Lambert & Fils launches its new Corridor gallery space in Montreal

Young Montreal lighting brand Lambert & Fils has gained recognition in the past few years with a series of blockbuster lighting collections that have broken away from the norms that have stagnated the lighting industry in the past few years. Notable designs include the airport-inspired Dorval series, developed with French studio SCMP. The boutique design house has also developed a series of lauded private and retail interiors. Building on this success, Lambert & Fils has just opened a new exhibition annex adjacent to its office and workshop. Located in the heart of Montreal, Corridor promises to become a new space for cultural exchange. The gallery will feature art and design, and will explore where these often-siloed disciplines intersect. To launch the new space, Lambert & Fils tapped Swiss designer Adrien Rovero to create a special, temporary installation. The Feu de Camp mise-en-scene draws inspiration from Rovero's short time in the boy scouts but also from Montreal’s long and cold winters. The installation incorporates various geometric forms, flashlight-inspired fixtures, and simple industrial materials—green tubes, elastics, electrical wires, and semi-spherical glass diffusers—loosely in the form of a campfire as a way to bring people together during the dreary late-winter season. The installation is arranged around a central node with 12 low-lying lamps surrounding in a circle. These elements were used sparingly to compose a playful yet technically-refined setup, and Rovero also created a wall mural that illustrates this peculiar typology in his unique assemblage-inspired aesthetic. Though this inaugural installation closes tomorrow, Corridor will open the new Studio Edition exhibition—a group show featuring work by emerging Canadian designers—in the coming months.
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Lutron opens New York lighting center and showroom

The Pennsylvania-based Lutron Electronics has opened a new showroom in the D&D Building on Third Avenue in Midtown Manhattan. The lighting and shading company, long known for their commitment to good design and the latest technology, now has a space where designers can experience the company’s products. It is possible to test their entire line, including the technologically advanced Ketra line and what they call “human-centric lighting.” Architects will also appreciate the Ivalo line of fixtures that are perhaps the best designed of any American product on the market. The space is located on the third floor of the D&D building at 979 Third Avenue, is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and welcomes walk-in clients.
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Salesforce Tower’s massive light show to permanently illuminate San Francisco’s skyline

Salesforce Tower’s nine-story steel topper is set to light up San Francisco permanently starting tomorrow night, as video artist Jim Campbell’s enormous animations will start broadcasting from the top. The tower’s 130-foot-tall, Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects-designed crown is hollow and has been clad in perforated aluminum panels–ostensibly to lessen the bullet-shaped building’s impact on the skyline. Using imagery from cameras scattered around the city (and 11,000 LEDs inside of the crown), Campbell will translate traffic, the sky, and each night’s sunsets into a public art piece visible for 20 miles in every direction. The fleeting, ephemeral images are an ode to the city’s vibrancy and energy. During a test run last Wednesday, giant ballerinas could be seen dancing across a beige background over 1,000 feet in the air. The tower’s signature piece, Day for Night, will start by showing the colors of that night’s sunset, followed by constellations against the night sky until the sun rises again. While the top nine floors of the Salesforce Tower are unoccupied and were used to push the building into “tallest in San Francisco” territory, only the upper six floors will be used to stage Campbell’s installation. The remaining three will hold the required equipment and will be bathed in a strong light to form a base for the animation above. While the punctured panels could theoretically show any images, Campbell swears that his work won’t be used for advertisements or to mark holidays. As for the electricity use? It’s the same as “five toaster ovens,” Campbell told the San Francisco Chronicle. The developers, designers, and engineers behind Salesforce Tower will be presenting on their work at the next Facades+ conference in San Francisco, taking place on June 7.
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2016 Best of Design Award for Lighting > Indoor: Planned Parenthood Queens by Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it's grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you.

2016 Best of Design Award for Lighting > Indoor: Planned Parenthood Queens—Diane L. Max Health Center

Lighting Design: Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design Location: Queens, NY

Planned Parenthood’s new clinic in Queens transforms a former storage warehouse into a welcoming ambulatory healthcare center. Using the building’s generous new windows as inspiration, LED light coves in bold colors punctuate a sleek, white interior. These colorful elements work with signage and furnishings to support wayfinding and spatial organization and the overall design embodies a modern, forward-thinking spirit, representative of the center’s youthful clientele. A thoughtful combination of LED and fluorescent sources achieves a 5 percent energy savings beyond the stringent standards and also meets the project’s modest budget. Light, color, and architecture are woven together to create a friendly, upbeat health center that will serve as a guide for future Planned Parenthood facilities.

Architect Stephen Yablon Architecture

Signage & Environmental Graphics Calori & Vanden-Eynden Dimming Ballasts Lutron Fixed-Color LED Cove Lights iLight Technologies Adjustable Downlights Lucifer Lighting

Honorable Mention, Lighting > Indoor: Lincoln Square Synagogue

Lighting Design: Tillotson Design Associates Location: New York, NY

Small recessed LED downlights in the synagogue’s ceiling create the effect of a starry night, while LED coves with resin diffusers spill soft light onto the acoustical walls, accentuating its form and completing the imagery of a nomadic tented structure under a desert sky.

Honorable Mention, Lighting > Indoor: The Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Assumption 

Architect: MBH Architects Location: San Francisco, CA

In order to maintain the character of this important cathedral while modernizing its lighting, long-life solutions like LED and fluorescent fixtures as well as DMX lighting were seamlessly integrated. The system creates studio-quality imagery for television recordings while maintaining a warm glow.

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2016 Best of Design Award in Architectural Lighting > Outdoor: SteelStacks Campus by L’Observatoire International

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it's grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you.

Architectural Lighting > Outdoor: SteelStacks Campus

Lighting Design: L'Observatoire International Location: Bethlehem, PA

The SteelStacks campus turns the former Bethlehem Steel Plant into a dynamic arts and cultural campus with a community center. Highlighting the history of the area, L’Observatoire International worked within the 10-acre core of the site to create multiple performance venues, plazas, and parks. The campus is crowned by the Hoover-Mason Trestle, a walkway rehabilitated from a former elevated railway, and features Levitt Pavilion, an angular open-air stage with monumental blast furnaces as a backdrop. The thoughtful attention to detail and theatrical approach to lighting—which illuminates the structure from within and behind to better highlight its volumes—emphasizes the drama of Bethlehem’s industrial heritage.

Landscape Architecture Wallace Roberts & Todd

Horticultural Design Patrick Cullina LED Lighting Philips Color Kinetics Lighting Fixtures Winona Lighting General Contractor Boyle Construction

Honorable Mention: Architectural Lighting > Outdoor: Eventide

Design Studio: Sosolimited Location: San Diego, CA

Sosolimited conceived a dynamic, nature-inspired architectural lighting system that brings the Cedar Kettner Garage to life. Beyond responding to actual lighting conditions in real time, the lighting system includes a user-friendly interface that allows staff to easily change the animations for holidays and events.

Honorable Mention: Architectural Lighting > Outdoor: Daryl Roth Theatre Facade Renovation

Lighting Design: Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design Location: New York, NY

Charged with transforming a 1907 landmark bank building into a theater with a new lighting structure, Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design sought to turn the facade into its own marquis. The versatility and precision of the lighting fixture illuminates its architectural details while lending the theater a lustrous presence.

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Product> It’s Lit: Sleek, Minimalist Lighting Design

These understated architectural lighting fixtures enhance any space both indoors and out. Minimalist design adds interest, without detracting from other elements. LED Pillar Luminaires Bega A new series of LED pendants featuring a velvet black housing finish and highly efficient LED source, the Pillar luminaires come in a choice of three interior metal paint finishes: aluminum, copper, and brass with three-ply, hand-blown opal glass that elegantly diffuses light. Slotlight LED II Zumtobel This collection of highly versatile lighting products allows a range of different lighting effects to be achieved in a space, all with a cohesive look. The design possibilities are endless, as all of the pieces can be customized in terms of length and light output. Razar LED Generation Bollard U.S. Architectural Lighting Available in single and twin head models, the Bollard design can be utilized to illuminate pathways and driveways as well as larger outdoor areas. It stands at 42 inches high in cast aluminum that is suitable for all environments. The fixture contains low drive currents and robust cooling fans that keep the surface temperature cool to the touch even after hours of operation. Stilo Targetti Perfect for highlighting walls and facades, the Stilo sconce, made of die-cast aluminum, is available in two styles. The flat configuration allows for a combination of effects including elliptical, asymmetrical, effect, and super-spot. Both styles have wattages that range from 11 watts to 33 watts. Kju Circle Selux Kju Circle comes in the option of a wall-mounted sconce or as a pendant with direct or direct-indirect lighting options. The opal covers allow for a diffused uniform illumination that can be used in corporate, hospitality, and retail scenarios. Adena Eklipse Architectural Lighting Available in two versions, single or square, the Adena fixture is ideal for highlighting products in retail and commercial spaces. The fixture length and stem height are made-to-measure, and several light shapes are offered with or without pixels.
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Philips unveils innovative lighting system at Clemson University

In the first installation of it's kind on a college campus, Philips has unveiled a large-scale lighting project that leverages a Power over Ethernet (PoE) system combined with LED lighting to improve energy efficiency. The system, installed on Clemson University's South Carolina campus, will deliver up to 70 percent in energy savings. According to Philips, "the customized system will provide flexible work spaces that encourage collaboration between faculty and students, [and] optimize space management in the facility." The Watt Family Innovation Center gathers "historical and real-time anonymous data from each lighting fixture to determine when a room is being used." Essentially the lighting is self-monitored, and uses motion-sensors to determine how much activity is happening in a room, and light the space accordingly. Additionally, the system can be controlled entirely from a single software console and allows for remote access via any authorized smartphone or tablet. Additionally, the center also features "the largest media facade installation in the U.S. using Philips iColor Flex LMX gen2, flexible strands of large high-intensity LED nodes with intelligent color light," according to Philips, which can be used to display student news, and large graphics to display school spirit. The installation includes more than 45,000 individually controllable light points.
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This Weekend> Giant rainbows and iridescent pools light up Cleveland

Through Saturday night, a public art project by LAND studio is turning Cleveland’s downtown malls into canvases for light displays including sweeping rainbows, iridescent discs, and high-definition projections. “Light Up Cleveland!” runs August 7–9 and is sponsored by a slew of companies and nonprofits. You can see a map and full schedule of events on ahacle.com. The installations include The Global Rainbow, which is visible from miles away, Jen Lewin’s responsive Pool of variegated stepping stones, and Drawing Lines—a maze of ropes strung up across the Cleveland Public Library's Eastman Reading Garden. Artist collective Obscura Digital will project high-resolution light works on the side of the city’s Public Auditorium, using 3D video mapping for a tactile and mesmerizing effect. LEDs abound in downtown Cleveland this weekend, which project coordinators LAND studio say reflects a growing excitement about ongoing efforts to revitalize the city's urban core. “AHA! is the perfect opportunity for people from all over the region to come downtown and enjoy the beauty of our city in a way we have never seen it before,” said LAND’s Ann Zoller in a statement. Earlier this year Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced plans to mount a similar exhibition along the Chicago River. That proposal was widely criticized as “frivolous,” though city officials maintain it would boost tourism. UPDATE Tuesday Aug. 12: See below for an added gallery of photos from the event, copyright Frank Lanza via LAND Studio. Featured artists include Yvette Mattern, Obscura Digital, Jen Lewin, and Iván Juárez. LAND Studio says the event brought thousands of visitors downtown over the weekend.
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Lighting Designers Give New Life To an Abandoned Finnish Silo

Punctured and illuminated, an oil silo on the Helsinki coastline has been recast as a permanent art installation. Silo 468 was commissioned in part to commemorate the city's 2012 appointment as a World Design Capital. Madrid-based Lighting-Design Collective were brought to the Finish city for the drastic transformation project. A pattern of perforations coats the former silo. Horizontal bands of perforations wrap around the exterior, intersected by irregular vertical streaks whose path follows that of the patterns of rust that once consumed the metal exterior. By day sun pierces through to dapple the interior of the space with ever-shifting shadows. On the outside of the structure LED lights nestled in each opening produce shimmering effects that mirror the play of light on the surface of the surrounding water. Once night falls the building acts as a canvas for a dramatic light show generated by the area's prevailing winds, a move that is not without precedent in lighting design. The ebb and flow of this display is meant to recall the movements of flocks of birds that frequent the seaside location. Harnessed by custom software that responds to its environment, the organic engine driving the light shows means that no pattern will ever repeat itself. The red paint that coats the inside of the building tinges the light show in order to create a distinct viewing experience for visitors to the inside of the building. Located in Kruunuvuorenranta district, the 52 foot silo is visible from central Helsinki.
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IESNYC Student Lighting Competition

  The 12th annual IESNYC Student Lighting Competition, “Fraction/Refraction”, was held Wednesday night at the appropriately well-lit Helen Mills Event Space in Chelsea.  The competition was open to all interested students in New York City and included entries from designers at Pratt Institute, Parsons/New School, Fashion Institute of Technology, Fordham, and New York School of Interior Design.  Over 100 entries created a luminous one-night exhibition of over 100 light-sourced objects, each with a different take on this year’s theme of  “how light plays with textures, flows through materials and creates layers of contrast.”   There were many different takes on the theme at different scales.  Some entries were more traditional light-emitting objects, others used multiple lights and materials to create layered effects, while some obscured the line between object and environment by projecting designs onto the walls of the gallery.  Many were interactive, and there were even some  architectural models, which doubled as lamps that night.  A keynote address came from Dietrich Neumann, author of Structure of Light: Richard Kelly and the Illumination of Modern Architecture, about Kelly’s work as "the first modern lighting designer" including his close collaborations with Philip Johnson and Mies Van Der Rohe.  Kelly even convinced Mies to use the white travertine in the Seagrams Building rather than dark green marble.   Grand Prize went to Pratt's Sejung Oh, whose project titled "Dal Beat" was inspired by Oh's pondering of the moon and how its light reflected off of water.  It was an interactive piece, inviting participants to hit the moon-like drumskin, sending vibrations through water which reflected the light into radial patterns. When asked what he was going to do next, Oh responded, "Im excited to go home and sleep. I didn't sleep last night."  Well, Sejung, it paid off.  The Grand Prize is $2,000 and a trip to Paris to visit L'atelier and La Machine.   Second Place was Ivre, by Sang Yoon-Lee also of Pratt. His well-constructed wine bottle projectors got the judges' attention with interactive cork screws which allowed users to play with the focus of light on the wall via lenses in the bottles.   In Third Place was Farnaz Hamedanchian, of New York School of Interior Design.  Her peaceful composition of natural elements used refracted light to make artful shadows on the wall behind them.  The simple, organic feel of the piece set it apart from most of the other projects which used an assortment of lighting technologies and synthetic materials.   An honorable mention went to Pratt's Andrew An and his "Quasar" project.  The simple setup utilized a directed light source in its base which was refracted through a suspended glass ball, making an animated projection on the ceiling.  The piece directly referenced Achille Castiglioni's Arco Lamp, and was one of many examples of projects that served as both object and environmental element, an interesting take on the theme of refraction.  
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Remembering 911: Tending to a Tribute in Light

Perched on the rooftop of a parking garage in Lower Manhattan a few blocks from the World Trade Center site, two groups of 44 light cannons pointing skyward will soon project high-intensity beams of light into the night sky for Tribute in Light, marking the tenth anniversary of the 911 World Trade Center attacks. Last week, as a crew of 30 workers was positioning the lights and laying cable to a large generator on the sidewalk, we stopped by to learn more what's involved with the massive display. Presented every year by the Municipal Arts Society, the display will shoot skyward at dusk on Sunday, September 11 and run through the night. Tribute in Light was initially conceived by three independent groups of architects and designers who each had a similar idea at the same time. Lighting designer Paul Marantz helped the groups merge their ideas into one viable lighting display, finding common ground between the three designs. "Light cannons," spotlights about 18-inches in diameter supported in metal frames, are arranged in square rings representing the footprints of the Twin Towers and staggered for optimum light density. Michael Ahern who is producing the display said the staggered pattern gives depth to the 48 foot by 48 foot squares. Once powered up, each of the 7,000-watt xenon searchlights will merge to form a beam of light that shoots four miles into the sky and is visible for 60 miles around. Ahern said such high-intensity lighting displays are rare, but noted that iconic beam shooting from the top of The Luxor casino in Las Vegas also projects light skyward in a similar fashion. Before the lights can be turned on, technicians must align each cannon so the entire array points in exactly the same direction to avoid the scattering of light. Spotters are dispatched to New Jersey, Staten Island, Brooklyn, and Uptown Manhattan to make sure the lights come together as a single beam. This labor-intensive process can take up to eight days. Once the switch is flipped, the display takes about five minutes to reach full intensity. Ahern said standing on the roof watching the lights is "beyond awesome...looking up , it really is genuinely amazing." He compared the experience to standing in a cathedral of light. The beams emit a slight blue hue, the same color as daylight, according to Ahern. With this many lights drawing so much electricity, Tribute in Light is not cheap. Combined with a grant from the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, the Municipal Arts Society has funded the $500,000 show out of its operating budget, but now that the grant money has run out, funding for future years is in jeopardy. The MAS is now seeking to establish an endowment and to find a permanent location to keep the lights running for years to come. The group has launched a fundraising campaign with a goal of several million dollars. Donations can be made directly to MAS at their web site or by calling 212.935.2075 or an immediate $10 donation can be made by texting the word TRIBUTE to 20222.