Posts tagged with "light":

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Datagrove weaves a tangled electronic web at ZERO1's Art + Technology Biennial

Fabrikator

Use of cell phones is strongly encouraged for tech devotees flocking to Silicon Valley's 'social media whispering wall'

As its name implies, Datagrove is literally a grove of data or a "social media 'whispering wall,'" if you will, that aggregates locally trending Twitter feeds and parrots them out of speakers and LCD displays woven into the digital branches of the installation. Nonprofit art/technology network ZERO1 commissioned the installation from San Francisco–based experimental design company Future Cities Lab for its Art + Technology Biennial in San Jose, CA, now on view through December 8, 2012. The theme of this year's Biennial is "Seeking Silicon Valley," which seems like a particularly appropriate place to plunder data normally hidden away in smartphones and amplify it for all to hear using custom sensors, text-to-speech modules, LEDs, and LCDs capable of responding directly to people in the immediate vicinity.
  • Fabricator  Future Cities Lab
  • Designer  Future Cities Lab
  • Location  San Jose, CA
  • Date of Completion  September, 2012
  • Materials  LEDs, LCD panels, IR sensors, Arduino, plywood, polypropylene, acrylic. galvanized steel
  • Process  Digital modeling (Rhino, Grasshopper, Firefly, Rhinocam), CNC milling, laser cutting, vacuum forming, heat slumping
In order to "render the invisible aspects of Silicon Valley visible," Nattaly Gattegno and Jason Kelly Johnson, the principals of Future Cities Lab, created a lattice structure interwoven with Twitter trending technology by Onehouse, IR sensors, TextSpeak's Text to Speech Module, LEDs by Super Bright LEDs, and Sparkfun's WiFly Shield and LCD panels that translate geo-located data feeds into light and sound. "As one approaches the installation a series of infrared sensors trigger the sensing pods to light up, which, through a series of embedded speakers, whisper to you the trending information like...Have you heard about...Oracle, or Have you heard about ...Olympics," said Gattegno. Before weaving everything together, Gattegno and Johnson first tested all of the materials individually while also developing "physical prototypes of the interactive sensing pods containing all the electronic components." After a series of tests they decided the best way to house the electronics was to seal them in vacuum formed 2-ply acrylic shells which they wove into a larger structure made from bent acrylic tubing and galvanized steel conduit. "The acrylic is heated and molded in a series of custom CNC milled jigs while the steel is bent over another set of custom jigs," Gattegno said. "Although made up of two material systems, the acrylic and steel interlock in a very deliberate way, structuring each other and suspending the sensing pods within them." All of the electronics, both the acrylic-shelled pods and the systems they operate with—the text-to-speech synthesizers, motion sensors, LCDs and LEDs—are part of an Arduino-based micro-controlled system produced and engineered in-house at Future Cities Lab's San Francisco workshop. The components were then secured to a base made from CNC milled plywood and polypropylene and installed onsite in the courtyard of San Jose's historic California Theater, creating a gathering place for the geographically disparate and disconnected Silicon Valley. The longer you view or interact with Datagrove, the easier it is to make sense of the data. Gradually, you discern patterns and begin to detect a natural cadence from what initially seems like a tangled web of Silicon Valley's verbal overflow.             Photographs by Peter Prato. Additional assistance from Ripon DeLeon, interns Osma Dossani and Jonathan Izen, assisted by David Spittler.
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MIT Lights It Up For Big 150

If you’re in Cambridge this weekend and you’re looking for a good time, head to MIT. That’s probably not what people usually say about a place where sleep is a treasured commodity, but the school is celebrating its 150th anniversary in a big way with a weekend of playful installations that light up the Charles River. The campus and the riverfront will be open to the public for over 20 interactive projects to mark the end of the Festival of Art+Science+Technology. The interactive projects, which showcase energy, light and media, promise to be grand in scope and creative in nature. Among them are: Light Drift, a display of ninety brightly glowing orbs in the river that change color as people sit on corresponding orbs along the shore; SOFT rockers (shown above), solar charging stations disguised as outdoor rocking lounge furniture; and Liquid Archive, a floating screen that will show the original artists’ proposals for the 1972 Charles River project. The weekend, which was curated by Professor Meejin Yoon (Principal of Howeler + Yoon Architecture and MY Studio), will feature work by MIT Department of Architecture Head, Nader Tehrani (founder and principal of Office d’A and of the newly formed NADAAA), Professor Sheila Kennedy (Principal of Kennedy Violich Architecture), and Yoon herself. Yoon originally created Light Drift for the Mural Arts Program in Philadelphia last year.
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Revealing A City′s Hidden Digital Landscapes

Ever hit a WiFi dead spot when moving about the city? A new visualization project called Immaterials: Light painting WiFi by Timo Arnall, Jørn Knutsen and Einar Sneve Martinussen reveals the hidden landscape of digital signals though long-exposure photography and a stick equiped with a WiFi sensor and LED lights. Here's more from YOUrban.no:
The city is filled with an invisible landscape of networks that is becoming an interwoven part of daily life. WiFi networks and increasingly sophisticated mobile phones are starting to influence how urban environments are experienced and understood. We want to explore and reveal what the immaterial terrain of WiFi looks like and how it relates to the city.
Looks like this project could feel right at home with the upcoming MoMA exhibition, Talk to Me, exploring the feedback of our environments. (Via information aesthetics.) Check out more photos over here.
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Bring to Light Fest Shines on Brooklyn

If New York is the city that never sleeps, how come it took us so long to get around to hosting our own Nuit Blanche (French for "Sleepless Night")? The global all-night festival of arts began in Paris, Berlin, and St. Petersburg way back in 1997, and has spread around the world in the years since. This Saturday, October 2, starting at 7:00 p.m., Brooklyn will host our city's first Nuit Blanche, rechristened "Bring to Light" by local organizers DoTank:Brooklyn and producers Furnace Media. Over 50 artists and performers will converge on Greenpoint's Oak St. between Franklin St. and the East River, taking over street corners, galleries, vacant lots, and rooftops to showcase their work. Although the range of media is broad -- some visual, some performative, some interactive -- the common threads running through them are light and sound. Among the highlights are Kant Smith's Small Explosion, a fiery cloud, a trompe-l'oeuil oil painting brought to life with rear illumination. Roselyn Anderson's Giant Puppet in His Natural Habitat is an installation comprising a giant puppet, three sculptures of illuminated meat, and a fluttering crowd of animatronic birds. And for ten percussive minutes, Tom Peyton enlists the help of a dozen drummers to turn Oak Street's scaffolding into a musical instrument. The event is free and open to the public; more info here.