Posts tagged with "Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF)":

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Renderings unveiled of Miami's future tallest skyscraper

Tibor Hollo, developer and president of Florida East Coast Realty (FECR), recently indicated a 40-month construction timeline for One Bayfront Plaza, a 92-story tower in downtown Miami designed by New York City–based Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF). In an interview with The Next Miami, Hollo referred to the project as “the building of the future,” touting its 104,000 square feet of retail space and direct connection to the Metromover transit station across Biscayne Boulevard. The tower will stand 1,049 feet tall, curtailed only by the Federal Aviation Administration which limits the maximum buildable height in Miami’s urban area. However, despite this limitation, One Bayfront Plaza will be Miami’s tallest tower, soaring a couple hundred feet higher than the imminent Panorama Tower, which will apex at 868 feet when completed. (Miami-based Arqitectonica is also designing an 80-story tower in nearby Brickell, though no word on its exact height yet.) Apart from its superlative height, the tower also breaks formal ranks: It's shaped with sinuous contours that contrast with the rectilinear silhouettes of downtown. The tower starts as a triangle at the base and seemingly twists as it rises into the air. According to Hollo, the tower will house more than 900 living units, a 200-key hotel, and 532,000-square-feet of office space. Construction is set to begin in January 2019.
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Public art component added to San Diego's "Super Prime" Pacific Gate development by KPF

A new public art installation by Jaume Plensa, the artist behind the Crown Fountain in Chicago’s Millennium Park, has been commissioned to adorn a plaza at the foot of the Kohn Pedersen Fox Architects (KPF)-designed Pacific Gate development in San Diego. The sculpture, made with stylized characters from the Latin, Hebrew, Greek, Cyrillic, Arabic, Japanese, Chinese, and Hindi alphabets and inspired by the roots of rainforest trees, will stand about 25-feet tall. It takes the shape of a seated individual looking out over the Pacific Ocean. The sculpture was commissioned by Bosa Development, the firm behind the project, specifically to compliment the new tower. It will adorn the public plaza beneath the so-called “Super Prime,” 41-story high-end condo tower. Residences in the development are being priced between $1.1 million and $2.8 million for two-bedroom and three-bedroom units, respectively. The 215 units contained within the tower will run between 1,240-square feet and 2,608-square feet in size and will feature interior design by Hirsch Bedner Associates (HBA), a group known mostly for high-end hotel interiors. Overall designs for the tower echo the form of a sea shell, with the facade of the tower taking the shape of a pair of conjoined, nested-curve-shaped towers designed to maximize outward views from each unit. The residences are to be located above a three-story parking and retail podium that will house 16,000 square feet of retail space and 460 parking stalls. Interiors will feature automated climate, lighting, and window treatments that can be controlled via smartphone or tablet. The units will also feature custom-designed kitchens by HBA, with cabinets made from “grain-matched cathedral veneer hewn from single lengths of wood,” as well as custom kitchen hardware, also by HBA, as well as quartz countertops and appliances by Wolf, Sub-Zero, and Miele. The project’s master bathrooms will contain polished stone floors and stone mosaic walls. Vancouver, Canada—based Chris Dikeakos Architects acted as architect-of-record for the project. The Pacific Gate development is expected to finish construction toward the end of 2017.
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Richard Meier, Rafael Viñoly, and KPF will each design a tower in this Manhattan development

Located between 61st Street and 59th Street, and next to the Henry Hudson Parkway, the newly-announced multi-tower "Waterline Square" development will stand among an interesting set of neighbors. On the other side of 61st Street is One Riverside Park of "poor door" infamy; across 59th street is the IRT Powerhouse, a massive Stanford White-designed steam production facility operated by ConEd (it was originally a subway power station). And just south of the IRT building—with its massive 240-foot-tall smokestack, the last of six originals—is Bjarke Ingles Group's hyperbolic paraboloid Via 57. Waterline Square—which is being developed by the Boston-based GID Development Group, owner of two nearby residential developments—will feature three glassy towers: One Waterline Square (Richard Meier and Partners Architects), Two Waterline Square (Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF)), and Three Waterline Square (Rafael Viñoly Architects). "Together, we are transforming one of the last remaining waterfront development sites on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, into a new, vibrant neighborhood," said James Linsley, president of GID Development Group, in a press release. Waterline Square will occupy the final large empty lot on Riverside Park South, which stretches from 72nd to 59th Street. The towers' luxury condominiums will be accompanied by "100,000 square feet of best-in-class sports, leisure, and lifestyle amenities, as well as a beautifully landscaped park and open spaces spanning nearly 3 acres," according to the press release. The new park will contain "a playground, fountains, and waterfalls." Construction actually began on Waterline Square in 2018 but this appears to be the first major release of the project's details and renderings. For more details, see the development's website here.
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KPF's One Vanderbilt breaks ground, signaling new era for Midtown East

This week Mayor Bill de Blasio, developer SL Green, and other suited officials gathered for the ceremonial groundbreaking of One Vanderbilt Avenue, soon to be one of New York's tallest towers. The building, designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF), will rise 1,401 feet skyward when it's complete in 2020. Notably, developer SL Green, the largest commercial property owner in the city, is investing millions in transit infrastructure upgrades in and around the site, which is across the street from Grand Central Terminal. Litigation that hampered development was settled in August, allowing the project to move forward. On the public side, improvements include a transit hall at the tower's base, a 14,000-square-foot pedestrian plaza on Vanderbilt Avenue, and more points of access to and from Grand Central for straphangers, Metro-North riders, and the Long Island Railroad's planned East Side Access. Grand Central, Mayor de Blasio noted at the ceremony, is the system's second-busiest, with 154,000 people passing through daily. The tower's enhanced public offerings are no accident, but an exchange for super size. The developer and city officials want One Vanderbilt to be a model of the type of development that could happen under the proposed rezoning of Midtown East. "By committing to $220 million in public investment, One Vanderbilt will benefit not only its tenants but the city as a whole," said Carl Weisbrod, chair of the City Planning Commission, in a statement. "As we move forward with a proposal to revitalize Greater East Midtown, we believe that One Vanderbilt will signal this neighborhood's full potential. For East Midtown, the best is yet to come." Weisbrod's remarks allude to the city's plans to add more competitive Class A office space to Midtown East to make the neighborhood more attractive to tenants who flock to modern office space downtown and in New Jersey. In October, Weisbrod told DNAinfo that the rezoning will most likely be approved within 12 months. The public portions of the 58-story building will come online before the project is totally complete. As for design, the tower's taper nods to New York's classic skyscrapers, while its sharp articulations express contemporary supertall ambitions. The $3 billion "trophy tower" will contain 1.7 million square feet of Class A office space, ceilings up to 20 feet tall, and de rigueur column-free floor plates. On its subastral levels, the structure leans back from the street, allowing previously obstructed views of Grand Central's cornice on its Vanderbilt Avenue side. More images of the project are available on the building's new website.
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Top global firms battle for $1.1 billion Sydney high-rise project

A plethora of big names are gunning for a $1.1 billion tower in Sydney, Australia. From the U.S., HOK, SOM, and KPF are vying for the commission. A stellar list of firms in their own right, British firms Foster + Partners and David Chipperfield Architects are also in running, alongside Australia’s BVN and Hassell. The lucrative project is an office skyscraper backed by developer Lendlease and located on 182 George Street. Nestled within Sydney's, Circular Quay—a prime piece of real estate—the office, according to the Architect's Journal, would climb to 813 feet. Tenants look set to gain access to vistas over the waterfront that look onto the iconic Sydney Harbor Bridge and Jørn Utzon’s Sydney Opera House. If built, the tower would be the tallest in the country. A masterplan is also said to be accompanying the scheme. On their website, Lendlease said that the scheme will "promote connectivity from George Street to Pitt Street, through to Circular Quay and maximise integration with transport infrastructure." In the statement, the developer goes on to say:
The project will deliver new quality commercial premises and new urban places in an environmentally sustainable way. A vibrant public place will be created with new urban amenity, including a public bike hub and public plazas with dining options, shopping, entertainment and leisure, delivering a new destination in Circular Quay for residents, visitors and workers. This will help to affirm Sydney's position as a globally relevant, intelligent, and innovative metropolis. It is also in alignment with the City of Sydney's vision to create activated areas and new public spaces.
The development is one of many touted/in the works for the area. Danish studio 3XN Architects is currently designing Quay Quarter Tower—a 49-storey office tower in the area of which they beat Japanese firm SANAA and MVRDV for the right to design. Meanwhile, the Sydney Opera House is undergoing a massive renovation courtesy of Australian firm ARM. Unlike his compatriots, Japanese architect Kengo Kuma won the commission for two high-rise residential towers earlier on this year. That project is due to cost $742 million and will offer two towers rising to 57 and 28 storeys, set for completion in 2018.
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Settlement allows KPF's Midtown supertall to move forward

SL Green has announced that the litigation around Kohn Pedersen Fox's (KPF) One Vanderbilt was settled, paving the way for construction to continue. The suit, brought by Andrew Penson of Midtown TDR Ventures, the owner of Grand Central Terminal, against SL Green and the City of New York involved a dispute over the station's air rights. Midtown TDR Ventures challenged the Vanderbilt Corridor rezoning amendment and the One Vanderbilt special permit that allowed the supertall to move forward. Recently, though, one of Midtown TDR Ventures investors, Lehman Broothers Holdings, sold a $65 million stake in the property, which may have prompted the settlement. The settlement "[eliminates] uncertainty surrounding the building," according to a press release from the SL Green's PR agency. The 1,401-foot-tall tower, bounded by Vanderbilt and Madison avenues between East 42nd and East 43rd streets, is slated to add 1.7 million square feet of Class A commercial space to the neighborhood. KPF refers to the building as "a 21st century successor to Rockefeller Center" that dialogues with the city's iconic office towers and Grand Central, its neighbor. To no one's surprise, Marc Holliday, CEO of SL Green, praised the settlement in a press release: “This is a major milestone for the future of East Midtown, clearing the way for One Vanderbilt to deliver state-of-the-art Class A office space and a $220 million investment in Grand Central’s transit infrastructure. We’re pleased that the new ownership of Midtown TDR Ventures shares our commitment to development in East Midtown and worked with us to quickly reach this agreement. With demolition nearly complete and work already underway on public improvements, One Vanderbilt is well on the way to becoming a reality.” As plans call for the tower to be connected to Grand Central, SL Green has agreed to invest $220 million in public infrastructure improvements in and around the station.
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Red Hook housing development will feature its own sustainable, resilient microgrid

The New York City Housing Authority (NCYHA) is on the hunt for a developer to back a sustainable heat and power generation complex for Brooklyn's biggest housing complex to be. NCYHA says the developer would "finance, design, construct, and operate a campus-scale heat, hot water, and electricity generation and delivery network" that will serve the 28 buildings housing 6,000 residents in Red Hook. Officially known as the "The Red Hook Houses District Energy System," the project will comprise two energy plants located at each end of the complex that will form a micro-grid that supplies the housing network. Additionally, as part of a post-Sandy contingency plan, the micro-grid would let the NYCHA to produce its own energy and link up with the Red Hook Community Microgrid scheme. "NYCHA believes that the distributed energy component of this project has the potential to be a self-sustaining enterprise, and the RFP provides an opportunity to raise dedicated funds for that," said NYCHA spokeswoman Zodet Negron. “As part of NYCHA’s Sandy Recovery program, we are working to build back stronger and more resilient than ever before,” added NYCHA Chair and CEO Shola Olatoye. As of last week, the NYCHA has released its "Request for Proposals" which calls for a two part submission process due on July 22 and September 9. Developers will work alongside New York firm KPF, who have produced a selection of renders, for the scheme. Nilda Mesa, director of the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability also mentioned how the scheme will combat greenhouse gas emissions. “NYCHA will be harnessing the energy produced in multiple ways, and eliminating individual building systems, which is a smart way to set up a system that will be better to maintain and control." In terms of funds for the project, The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has set aside $438 million for repairs on NYCHA buildings damaged by Sandy. "FEMA funds can pay for cogeneration/microgrid components that are consistent with the restoration and resiliency of electrical and heating systems that were damaged by Sandy," a spokeswoman said.  
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75 Rockefeller Plaza to get dose of green courtesy KPF

With the Landmarks Preservation Commission's (LPC) blessing, a building near Rockefeller Center is set to get green. On Tuesday, the LPC approved a verdant rooftop terrace addition to 75 Rockefeller Plaza, an early modernist building designed by Robert Carson and Earl Lundin in 1941 that sits on the north end of the plaza, between West 51st and West 52nd streets. Completed six years later, the 424-foot, 33-story building was originally part of Rockefeller Center, and was declared an individual landmark in 1985 when Rockefeller Center received its designation. New York–based Kohn Pederson Fox (KPF) and preservation consultants Higgins Quasebarth & Partners are revamping an extension on the tenth floor. The move gives the building more interior space as well as outdoor areas on the ninth floor roof. The proposal also includes an extension of the 11th floor that would create a terrace on the floor above. The designs reflect the commission's goal of keeping the terrace and garden from marring the historic viewshed. In the proposal, the architects emphasized the discreet qualities of their design from street level: The only new addition to the visible landscape is a new, laminated glass guardrail that encircles the terraces' perimeters. The commission approved this plan and Herzog & de Meuron's Upper East Side megamansion for a Russian billionaire with an entrancing backyard in the same session. Although 75 Rockefeller Plaza is a private office building, workers in nearby towers will be able to get a dose of greenery-by-proxy from their cubicle windows.
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Hudson Yards Is Reshaping NYC's Skyline and Streetscape

New York City's waterfront Hudson Yards development is a big deal—literally. The largest private real estate development in the history of the United States, the project comprises 17 million square feet of commercial and residential space and 14 acres of public open space. Hudson Yards is having "a catalytic effect in terms of kicking off an entire new neighborhood," said Related Companies' Michael Samuelian. (Related and Oxford Properties Group have partnered with a number of high-profile architecture firms to design and build the project.) "We don't just focus on a building, but on the relationships between buildings—the spaces between the buildings themselves are just as important." Samuelian and KPF's William Pedersen, whose firm is designing three skyscrapers for Hudson Yards, will deliver up-to-date information on the work in progress at next month's Facades+NYC conference. Hudson Yards promises to reshape the city on multiple scales. On the larger end, "the development of Hudson Yards fills a void in Manhattan's fabric which has prevented the city from having a dialogue with the Hudson River," explained Pedersen. Related commissioned a wide slate of architects "to purposely create variety and juxtaposition, which is the dominant characteristic of Manhattan's iconic skyline," he said. As important as Hudson Yards' impact on New York City's skyline, said Samuelian, is its capacity to create a welcoming streetscape. "We put considerable effort into ensuring we have warm, appropriate materials below 150 feet," he said. "Each building changes as it comes down to grade to give civility to the skyscrapers, to make them more humane participants in the street life of the city." Pedersen concurred. "The dominant characteristic of our buildings is their gestural capacity," he said. "They do not stand in isolation but rather seek an active relationship with every aspect of the context they engage, including the pedestrian on the street." Catch up with Samuelian, Pedersen, and other AEC industry leaders reshaping New York's built environment at Facades+NYC. Register today to secure your space at the symposium and in a lab or dialog workshop of your choice.
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KPF architect Shawn Duffy examines trends in London facade design

A specialist in large-scale projects with over 20 years of experience, Kohn Pedersen Fox principal Shawn Duffy is a keen observer of trends in London's commercial and residential building markets. Next month, Duffy—who served as managing principal on Aykon Nine Elms and One Nine Elms—joins BuroHappold Engineering's Jonathan Sakula in a panel on "London Calling: The Bold New Face of the UK" at the Facades+ NYC conference. With respect to commercial developments, observed Duffy, one contemporary preoccupation is how to improve the adaptability of the facade by the occupants. "Most often the outer layer of skin simply wraps a traditional sealed curtain wall with no operable panels," he said. "The control of the blinds in the ventilated cavity is done by a central computer system concerned mainly with reducing heat gain, leaving little or no individual control over daylighting and glare." Duffy anticipates an increased focus on how to enhance the comfort of individual users without sacrificing overall sustainability goals. "The challenge will be balancing the conflicting issues of natural ventilation and noise, daylighting and glare, fresh air and reduction in mechanical loads," he said. On London's residential construction scene, meanwhile, one challenge is the fact that "facades in both tower and low rise construction require solid building materials—aesthetically, so they don't look like office buildings, and in increasing percentages, technically, in order to meet the stringent facade performance requirements," explained Duffy. Because materials including brick and stone are so expensive, architects are often left few options for cladding other than metal or concrete-composite panels. The situation may soon change for the better, however. "The use of prefabricated, fully glazed facade panels is increasing," said Duffy. "The benefits of improved quality control in finishes and reduced fabrication/construction time is offsetting the increased cost of quality materials, creating better looking and performing residential facades." High performance building envelopes have the potential to help mitigate some of London's most pressing concerns, including energy waste. At present, London's commercial market  remains fixated on floor to ceiling glass. "The value of extensive glass facades to office developers and occupiers looks likely to continue as a main driver of office facade design," said Duffy. But a growing emphasis on environmental performance will eventually privilege more solid surfaces, he predicted. "We will then see more commercial buildings turning the amount and type of glazing to the orientation of the facades, the existing and future context, and the types of spaces within." Learn more about the cutting edge in facade design and fabrication in London, New York, and beyond at Facades+ NYC April 21-22. For a full agenda and to register, see the conference website.
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Kohn Pedersen Fox plays Jenga with this Madison Avenue building, pulling mass away and stacking it on top

It's addition by subtraction on Madison Avenue, where Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF) is playing real-life Jenga with a 24-story office building between East 46th and 47th streets in Midtown Manhattan. The architects are removing select floors of 380 Madison Avenue, and stacking them on top of each other to make a taller building. In all, 18 percent of the building will be removed and re-stacked, nudging the building up to 32 stories from its original 24. Amazingly, the rearranged tower, to be renamed 390 Madison Avenue, will have the same amount of square footage as its squatter self, YIMBY reports. Construction is expected to be complete by early 2017. There will be 663,419 square feet of commercial space (mostly for offices), and the first two floors will be double-height, for retailers looking for a swanky address on one of the city's most prestigious shopping streets. The current facade, 1980s dark glass, will be replaced by floor-to-ceiling clear glass panels. The video below, fashioned after an action movie trailer, shows exactly how the building gets taller and leaner. https://vimeo.com/110394303 390 Madison Avenue is not the only recent tower to get Jenga'd. Last June, Büro Ole Scheeren released plans for a residential tower in Vancouver with boxy massing. Two months later, Pritzker Prize–winning architect Eduardo Souto de Moura unveiled plans for a mixed-use tower in Washington, D.C. with a similar profile, while NBBJ's tower, announced last September, promises to topple expectations for Cleveland's skyline. Though AN did not make the comparison initially, BIG's new police station in the Bronx could fall under this emerging typology.
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David Chipperfield chosen for 2016 Rolex Mentor and Protege Arts Initiative

Swiss watchmaker Rolex is looking out for new talent. The Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative pairs accomplished artists and designers across all disciplines with emerging practitioners for a yearlong, one-on-one mentorship. At an awards ceremony on Sunday in Mexico City, David Chipperfield was chosen as the mentor in architecture. The partnership with the as-yet-unchosen protege will begin mid-2016. A noted architect of cultural and civic institutions, Chipperfield designed Mexico City's Museo Júmex (completed 2013); the Nobel Center in Stockholm (set to open in 2018); the Royal Academy of Arts master plan (expected completion: 2018); and the Turner Contemporary Gallery in Margate, England. In September of this year, David Chipperfield Architects beat out KPF and Foster + Partners to convert the Eero Saarinen–designed United States Embassy in London into a hotel. For the Rolex initiative, panels of arts professionals all over the world convene to nominate new talent in their respective fields. Mentors choose from a list of three to four finalists. Winners will be announced in June of next year. The pair is asked to spend at least six weeks together, collaborating on projects. Past mentors in architecture include Peter Zumthor (2014–2015), Kazuyo Sejima (2012–2013), and Alvaro Siza (2002–2003). In addition to Chipperfield, this year the committee selected Mia Couto (literature), Alfonso Cuarón (film), Philip Glass (music), Joan Jonas (visual arts), Robert Lepage (theatre) and Ohad Naharin (dance).