Posts tagged with "Koch Brothers":

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Indiana draws conservative ire for $55 million 200th birthday bash and bicentennial plaza by MKSK

Hoosiers, if you didn't get a gift for Indiana on the occasion of its 200th birthday next year, don't fret—state and local governments have pledged tens of millions in infrastructure investments and new buildings for the Bicentennial. The state's share carries a total value of more than $55 million, inviting criticism from fiscal conservatives. Americans for Prosperity, the political group bankrolled by Billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch, is among those casting doubt on claims from statehouse budget officials that a decision to sell off underutilized cellular tower capacity will offset the new spending. Projects include a long-discussed upgrade to the state archives facility totaling $25 million, and $24 million for a new inn at Potato Creek State Park near South Bend. The state has also planned to spend $1.6 million on a six-week, statewide torch relay across all 92 Indiana counties, and $2 million to build a new Bicentennial Plaza designed by landscape architects at MKSK Studios. Former Lt. Gov. Becky Skillman, who co-chairs the state's Bicentennial Commission along with former Congressman Lee Hamilton, told the Indianapolis Star the projects leading up to the actual statehood Bicentennial of December 11, 2016 are an investment in the future of the state:
We want to celebrate and make memories, of course,” Skillman said, “but more importantly we want to help prepare Indiana for the next 100 years of progress and change.
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How the Koch brothers helped stop Nashville’s plan for Bus Rapid Transit

The plan to build Nashville’s first-ever bus rapid transit (BRT) system is dead and the billionaire Koch Brothers helped kill it. The Tennessean is reporting that after months of controversy, the city has ceased all planning efforts for the Amp, a 7-mile BRT system that would have connected Nashville’s neighborhoods and given the city one of its first major pieces of smart mass-transit policy. Like many major public transit projects, the Amp had its detractors from the beginning. In Nashville, a local auto mogul, limousine company owner, and attorney joined forces to form “Stop Amp”–a group dedicated to pressuring the city into pulling the plug on the plan. That coalition was reinforced by Republican lawmakers and, yes, the Koch brothers. In March, the Tennessean reported that the state chapter of the brothers’ right-wing political advocacy group Americans For Prosperity (AFP) helped create a bill that would “make it illegal for buses to pick up or drop off passengers in the center lane of a state road.” It was a thinly veiled attempt at killing the Amp outright. AFP’s Tennessee director, Andrew Ogles, told the newspaper that the Kochs’ organization didn’t funnel money toward the cause; rather, “the [anti-Amp] bill grew out of a conversation he had had with Senator Jim Tracy, the sponsor.” A compromise bill that was pushed by the mayor softened that language and allowed the plan to move forward. But still, the plan to give Nashville its first bus rapid transit system failed. With the Amp dead, city officials say they will be looking for new “transit solutions” for Nashville.                  
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Eavesdrop> Na Na Na Na Hey Hey Hey Goodbye

Opponents of storing petcoke, a sooty byproduct, on Chicago’s Southeast Side can breathe easier now that Beemsterboer Slag Corp. has announced it’s leaving the city for greener (for now) pastures, following public pressure from the city and angry neighbors. The Koch Brothers typically set (read: buy) trends rather than follow them, so don’t expect their petcoke business KCBX to hoist anchor anytime soon, but enviros can celebrate this development, even if the city’s new regulations give companies a full two years to cover their dusty piles of petcoke.